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FCEP NEWS





We'll see you BY THE SEA!

Symposium by the Sea is taking place at
The Boca Raton Resort & Club
501 E. Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL 33432
August 7-10, 2014

Symposium by the Sea 2014 Brochure

On-site registration is available!



Symposium by the Sea
Overflow Hotel Information

The Boca Raton Resort & Club is SOLD OUT for Symposium by the Sea. Haven't made your reservation yet? That's okay, because we've arranged another great option for you:

Waterstone Resort & Marina Boca Raton - a Double Tree by Hilton Hotel
999 East Camino Real
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-368-9500

RESERVE YOUR ROOM

Rate: $149 plus tax per night
Parking: $15 per day (valet only)
Group: Florida Emergency Medicine Foundation
Group Code: FEM

Reservations can be made using the customized registration link above or by calling the hotel directly and mentioning FEMF.

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Emergency Medicine Conference for the Mid-Level Provider




This conference consists of lectures and hands-on skill stations (e.g. slit lamp, wound care etc.) and is designed to enhance the mid-level provider's knowledge and skills in caring for patients in the emergency department and urgent care setting.

On-site registration is available!

Date: August 7-8, 2014

Location: Boca Raton Resort & Club
501 E Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL 33432

Cost: $350 for a two day conference
For an additional $175, registrants may participate in Symposium by the Sea, happening simultaneously. For more details about Symposium by the Sea, click here.

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Save the date!



Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


November 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care.

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Important FCEP dates

August 7-10, 2014 Symposium by the Sea
FCEP COMMITTEE MEETINGS
August 7, 2014 8-8:55 a.m. FCEP Professional Development/Membership Committee Meeting
9-9:55 a.m. FCEP Academic Affairs Committee Meeting
10-10:55 a.m. FCEP Medical Economics Committee Meeting
11-11:55 a.m. FCEP Government Affairs Committee Meeting
2-4:30 p.m. FECP Board of Directors Meeting
August 8, 2014 8-8:55 a.m. FCEP EMS/Trauma Committee Meeting
9-9:55 a.m. FCEP Pediatric EM Committee Meeting
4-5 p.m. FCEP EMRAF Committee Meeting
August 7-8, 2014 Emergency Medicine Conference for Mid-Level Provider

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS


Initiative to combat trafficking in ER by training doctors and nurses to spot victims
The Associated Press via The Ledger
Emergency room doctors and nurses are often the only contact victims of human trafficking have with the outside world, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said while launching an initiative aimed to train emergency workers how to identify signs of trafficking. Under the plan, emergency room workers will be trained to ask certain questions of people who show signs of being trafficked. Those questions run the line of "Who is that person with you?" to "Do you ever feel pressured to do something you didn't want to do?" to "Has anyone approached you asking you to get involved in prostitution?"
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Gov. Scott: Fee reductions for healthcare professionals
Governor Rick Scott's Press Office
The Board of Medicine will reduce the physician license renewal fee for the next biennium from $360 to $250. Physicians renewing their license in 2015 or 2016 will pay this lower fee, which has the potential to produce up to $6 million in savings that can be reinvested into Florida’s economy by these medical professionals.
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We're getting closer to vaccines and drugs for Ebola
TIME
National Institutes of Health immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci told CBS This Morning that his research team is working on a vaccine to prevent Ebola, which is completely effective in monkeys, and will be tested in humans in September. And he’s not the only one developing a treatment for the deadly disease. The question is: Should experimental treatments be rushed into practice, given the breadth of this outbreak?
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Virtual therapy sessions make mental-healthcare more widely available
The Boston Globe
Facing a new diagnosis of cancer, Josh Stoffregen needed his therapist more than ever. But with daily chemo and a depleted immune system, leaving his home in the winter to see his psychologist in her Manhattan office was a risky venture. So his doctor, Chloe Carmichael, offered him an unexpected option: What about Skype?
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As Sunshine Act deadlines approach physicians and hospitals should prepare for transparency in their financial relationships with industry
JD Supra Business Advisor
On Sept. 30, 2014, in accordance with the Federal Sunshine Act (the Sunshine Act), the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will publically disclose payments and "other transfers of value" by pharmaceutical, device, biotech, and medical supply companies to physicians and teaching hospitals. Disclosure will cover payments for a wide array of purposes including consulting, speaking engagements, advisory board service, travel and clinical research as well as physician ownership and investment interests in manufacturers and group purchasing organizations. With the date for Sunshine Act disclosure rapidly approaching, teaching hospitals and physicians must grapple with review of the information reported about them and prepare for unprecedented public transparency in their financial relationships with life science companies and manufacturers.
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Radiology utilization in emergency departments declines
Diagnostic Imaging
After a steady increase for 14 years, imaging in the emergency department (ED) has declined since 2007, according to an article published in the American Journal of Roentgenology. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, undertook a retrospective study to assess radiology trends for emergency departments from 1993 to 2012.
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Hospital, insurer earnings show mixed messages about health spending
Kaiser Health News
Analysts who fear health spending is accelerating got plenty of evidence in Wall Street's second-quarter results to support their thesis. But so did folks who hope spending is still under control. Now everybody's trying to sort out the mixed message. The answer matters because deficit debates and affordability concerns revolve around forecasts that health spending will speed up as the economy revives. If it doesn't, the future looks better for consumers, employers and taxpayers.
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HIV diagnoses in US declined significantly in past decade
Healio
The national HIV diagnosis rate in the United States decreased more than 30 percent during the past decade, according to new research published in JAMA. However, increases in diagnoses were observed in certain age groups of men who have sex with men, particularly young men. “Accurate HIV diagnosis data recently became available for all states, allowing for the first time an examination of long-term national trends,” researchers wrote.
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Modeling tool sheds insight on physician workforce needs
FierceHealthIT
n an effort to predict where the physician shortage will hit the hardest, researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill have developed a web-based model to determine how many physicians each region, state and the nation needs. The FutureDocs Forecasting Tool focuses on the idea of plasticity — that physician specialists have overlapping areas of expertise, the announcement explains.
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Emergency room docs struggle with two-midnight rule, observation status
FierceHealthcare
As hospitals across the nation face the complications involved with the two-midnight rule, emergency physicians may experience the most conflicts as they strive to balance patient needs with the federal government requirements for short inpatient stays. Emergency and internal medicine physicians often struggle to get the right designation and status for the patient, Catherine Polera, M.D., (pictured) chief clinical officer of the division of emergency medicine at Sheridan Healthcare, a national hospital-based, multispecialty practice management company, told FierceHealthcare in an exclusive interview.
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Associations between in-hospital bed occupancy and unplanned 72-h revisits to the emergency department: A register study
International Journal of Emergency Medicine
The lack of associations between in-hospital occupancy and unplanned 72-h revisits does not support the hypothesis that ED patients are inappropriately discharged when in-hospital beds are scarce. The results are reassuring as they indicate that physicians are able to make good decisions, also while resources are constrained.
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Influenza: Complications in 1 in 3 previously healthy kids
Medscape (free login required)
As many as 1 in 3 children seeking treatment in the emergency department for influenza-like illnesses (ILI) at the peak of influenza season are at high risk of suffering severe complications, such as pneumonia, according to a prospective cohort study. The risks are even higher for children with neurologic or neuromuscular conditions. The data support more frequent use of antiviral therapy for both at-risk and previously healthy children, the authors say.
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Florida Medical Association endorses Medicaid expansion
Miami Herald
For the first time, members of the Florida Medical Association have approved a resolution endorsing Medicaid expansion, a politically contentious issue that the group’s leaders have generally avoided over the last two legislative sessions. By unanimous voice vote at the FMA’s annual conference in Orlando, several hundred members approved a resolution written by South Florida obstetrician/gynecologist Aaron Elkin calling for FMA to publicly support expanding Medicaid eligibility as long as the program “safeguarded patient access to care while increasing Medicaid payment rates to Medicare levels for all physicians.”
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Emergency department visits, hospitalizations due to insulin
The Hospitalist
Using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance Project and the National Health Interview Survey, the authors estimated the rates and characteristics of ED visits and hospitalizations for insulin-related hypoglycemia. The authors estimated that about 100,000 ED visits occur nationally and that almost one-third of those visits result in hospitalization. Compared to younger patients treated with insulin, patients 80 years or older were more likely to present to the ED and much more likely to be subsequently hospitalized for insulin-related hypoglycemia.
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Innovative 'genotype first' approach uncovers protective factor for heart disease
Health Canal
Extensive sequencing of DNA from thousands of individuals in Finland has unearthed scores of mutations that destroy gene function and are found at unusually high frequencies. Among these are two mutations in a gene called LPA that may reduce a person’s risk of heart disease. These findings are an exciting proof-of-concept for a new “genotype first” approach to identifying rare genetic variants associated with, or protecting from, disease followed by extensive medical review of carriers.
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Being data driven in the ED
Healthcare Informatics
The University of California (UC) San Diego Health System, a two hospital health system, serves a population of three million people in metropolitan San Diego. More than 70,000 patients pass through its emergency department (ED) per year. In case you weren’t aware, that’s a lot of people. On any given day, UC San Diego hospitals may see 200 people come through its ED. According to Theodore Chan, M.D., UCSD Chair of Emergency Medicine, approximately 20 percent of patients seen in the ED are admitted.
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Access to specialty care out of reach for many
The Associated Press via Modern Healthcare
A finger on Myrtis Henderson's left hand is stuck in a bent position, a cyst on the tendon freezing any motion. Henderson is a long-time patient of Dr. Jeannette South-Paul at the Matilda Theiss Family Health Center in Pittsburgh's Hill District. South-Paul has helped her keep control of her diabetes, but the finger is another matter. "The only thing that is going to help that is a surgical procedure," South-Paul told Henderson, an unemployed pre-school teacher, at a recent appointment. "And until you have insurance, I can't help you."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Do hospital-run urgent care centers reduce ER use? (By Alan Kelsky)
Ketamine, the emergency room wonder drug (Science 2.0)
Medical director recognized for efforts
Pioneer in forming statewide EMS education
(Broward Sheriff's Office)
Dextromethorphan abuse: A common choice for addicts of all ages (By Cynthia Sheppard Solomon)
3 questions can screen for suicide risk in ED patients (Clinical Psychiatry News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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