This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    August 13, 2014
Home   About   Membership   Advocacy   CME & Conferences   EMpulse Magazine   Job Bank   Contact  

 


FCEP NEWS



Symposium by the Sea 2014

Symposium by the Sea 2014 concluded this past Sunday in Boca Raton, Florida. As the annual meeting of the Florida College of Emergency Physicians, Symposium by the Sea consisted of board and committee meetings, an amalgam of exciting educational programs and competitions, and several fun social events - all taking place at the beautiful Boca Raton Resort and Club. For some conference highlights, read more here.


SimWars Competition

Past President Michael Lozano, Jr. and
New President Ashley Booth-Norse

Poster Abstracts Winner

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article



2014 Emergency Medicine "Life After Residency" Workshop

Tuesday, Sept. 30 - Wednesday, Oct. 1

Embassy Suites Orlando- Downtown
191 East Pine Street
Orlando, Florida 32801
Located next to Lake Eola and a short walk to Orlando nightlife.

Make your reservations early!
Call 1-800-809-9708 and ask for the "Florida Emergency Medicine Foundation" group rate. The room rate is $139.00 plus tax.
Hotel reservation DEADLINE: Sept. 1

The "Life After Residency" event is sponsored through the Florida College of Emergency Physicians (FCEP) and is offered to all residency programs. For more information, including the workshop topics that will be covered, CLICK HERE.

Confirm your participation in the 2014 Emergency Medicine Life After Residency workshop by contacting your residency program coordinator.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article



Save the date!



Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


November 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS


The question doctors can't ask
The Atlantic
In a 2-1 vote, a U.S. Court of Appeals upheld a law called the Florida Privacy of Firearm Owners Act, ruling that doctors asking patients about firearms violates patients' right to privacy. “The act simply codifies that good medical care does not require inquiry or record-keeping regarding firearms when unnecessary to a patient’s care,” Judge Gerald Tjoflat wrote in the court's majority opinion. Legislation Restricting Physician Counseling on Firearm Safety; Blue = Introduced, Yellow = Adopted (American Academy of Pediatrics) The American Medical Association calls gun violence a horrific epidemic. In 2011, the group issued a call for doctors to counsel patients on gun safety.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


With health law, emergency rooms still packed
The Inquirer via Philly.com
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Some health insurers raise 2015 Florida exchange rates
The Associated Press via WTVT-TV
Eight insurance companies are raising the price of health plans and three are lowering them in Florida through the Affordable Care Act exchange, state insurance officials said Monday. But whether you'll pay more or less depends on a complex formula including where you live and how many companies are competing in that market. Fourteen companies, including three new insurers, are planning to sell to Floridians through healthcare.gov in 2015.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Emergency room closures can be deadly for area's residents
Los Angeles Times
It stands to reason that when a hospital emergency room closes, people in the surrounding neighborhood suffer. But how much? A new study quantifies the impact in California, finding that patients affected by ER closures were 5 percent more likely to die after being admitted to a hospital than were patients who didn’t lose an ER in their neighborhood.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Accuracy + No Drops + No Calibration = ER Friendly
Icare tonometry provides accuracy, speed and care patients need when it matters the most. For more information or demo, call 813.505.3495, email focirth@aol.com MORE
Wellsoft EDIS...
is best for clinicians. Speed, ease of use & full integration with your HIS, Wellsoft improves workflow, decreases liability, optimizes revenue. MORE


Drug-related suicide attempts rise sharply
CBS News
There has been a significant rise in drug-related suicide attempts in the past few years, with the most alarming increase among middle-aged people, two new reports find. Hospital emergency department visits involving drug-related suicide attempts in people ages 45 to 64 doubled between 2005 and 2011 — rising from 28,802 cases in 2005 to 58,775 in 2011. Overall, there was a 51 percent increase in suicide-related visits to emergency departments among people age 12 and older — from 151,477 visits in 2005 to 228,277 visits in 2011, according to the reports by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Active shooters and other violence: How hospitals should prepare
Healthcare Dive
According to security consultants, a case involving a doctor with a weapon is highly unusual. But hospital staffers, especially those working in ERs or mental-health units, must be ready to react; they have been cited by OSHA as being among the types of workers at higher risk for workplace violence. Shootings at U.S. hospitals may occur several times annually—and typically involve mercy killings, disgruntled family members shooting doctors over perceived care shortcomings, or prisoners disarming police escorts in the ER; but there are many smaller incidents and threats: some reported and some not.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Ebola declared international public health emergency
Bloomberg
The worst Ebola outbreak on record is a public health emergency that threatens nations outside the four in West Africa where the virus is spreading, the World Health Organization said The Geneva-based United Nations health agency stopped short of recommending a general travel and trade ban, saying only that infected people shouldn't cross borders except as part of an official medical evacuation. Affected countries should work with airlines to ensure proper care for crews based there and enable quick identification of passengers who may have had contact with infected people, the WHO said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New Medicaid program seeks to foster innovation
By Marisa Frisch
On July 14, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced the Medicaid Innovation Accelerator Program (IAP), a group of technical assistance tools. The aim of this program is to improve the health of Medicaid beneficiaries, thereby supporting the Triple Aim, and reducing overall costs for the Medicaid program.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


3 privacy and security challenges in Meaningful Use Stage 2
Government Health IT
Since the inception of meaningful use within the HITECH Act through April 2014, approximately 80 percent of all eligible hospitals received an incentive payment for demonstrating Meaningful Use requirements through the use of an EHR. The program isn’t without challenges, however. Meeting MU Stage 2 standards has proven difficult due to the number of processes, departments and IT systems impacted. While still an achievable goal, MU attestation is now a far more difficult one.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


When medicine, technology and social need meet
mHealthNews
Medical innovation is leaning, if not teetering, on the brink of a culture of “cool,” and mHealth is no exception. Yet investment in brilliantly practical, infinitely useful and often simple innovations that hold the potential to improve global healthcare has been no match for many of these wow-factor technologies. Brain cells from urine. Artificial lung tissue grown with magnetic levitation. 3-D printed organs, implants and bone. Headline-hoggers like these have flash and build excitement around the potential to address every possible health condition.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New test predicts individual's risk of a second kidney stone
Health eCareers
A new tool that takes multiple factors into account can accurately predict how likely a patient who experienced a painful kidney stone will develop another one in the future. The tool, which is described in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, could help patients and their doctors determine whether preventive measures are needed. Kidney stones are common and affect approximately 6 percent to 9 percent of the population.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Medicaid expansion gives boost to hospital chains
FierceHealthFinance
Medicaid expansion as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has not only helped millions of Americans improve their health, it also helped for-profit hospitals improve their bottom lines, Reuters reported. Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), the for-profit hospital chain, was able to post better-than-expected earnings for the second quarter ending June 30 due to the increase in the number of patients it treated insured by Medicaid, according to Reuters. Revenue for the quarter increased 9.2 percent, to $9.23 billion, according to HCA, but more telling was the chain's provision for doubtful accounts, which dropped by a third.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Characteristics of United States emergency departments that routinely perform alcohol risk screening and counseling for patients presenting with drinking-related complaints
The Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
To increase routine alcohol screening and counseling for patients presenting with alcohol-related complaints, ED directors' perceived barriers related to an ED's capacity to perform screening, such as limited financial and staff resources, should be addressed, as should directors' concerns regarding the implementation of preventive health services in EDs. Uniform reimbursement methods should be used to increase ED compensation for performing this important and effective service.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Emergency department visits, hospitalizations due to insulin
The Hospitalist
The authors estimated that about 100,000 ED visits occur nationally and that almost one-third of those visits result in hospitalization. Compared to younger patients treated with insulin, patients 80 years or older were more likely to present to the ED and much more likely to be subsequently hospitalized for insulin-related hypoglycemia.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Emergency department closures can affect death rates, finds UCSF research
News-Medical
In the first analysis of its kind, UC San Francisco research shows that emergency department closures can have a ripple effect on patient outcomes at nearby hospitals. In a study of more than 16 million emergency admissions to California hospitals between 1999 and 2010, researchers found that patients who were admitted to facilities located in the vicinity of an emergency department (ED) that had recently closed experienced 5 percent higher odds of dying than patients admitted to hospitals that were not near a recently closed ED.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Virtual therapy sessions make mental-healthcare more widely available (The Boston Globe)
Being data driven in the ED (Healthcare Informatics)
Initiative to combat trafficking in ER by training doctors and nurses to spot victims (The Associated Press via The Ledger)
As Sunshine Act deadlines approach physicians and hospitals should prepare for transparency in their financial relationships with industry (JD Supra Business Advisor)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
Contribute news


Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the FCEP EMnews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

Aug. 6, 2014
July 23, 2014
July 16, 2014
July 9, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063