This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    August 27, 2014
Home   About   Membership   Advocacy   CME & Conferences   EMpulse Magazine   Job Bank   Contact  

 


FCEP NEWS



2014 Emergency Medicine "Life After Residency" Workshop

Tuesday, Sept. 30 - Wednesday, Oct. 1

Embassy Suites Orlando- Downtown
191 East Pine Street
Orlando, Florida 32801
Located next to Lake Eola and a short walk to Orlando nightlife.

Make your reservations early!
Call 1-800-809-9708 and ask for the "Florida Emergency Medicine Foundation" group rate. The room rate is $139.00 plus tax.
Hotel reservation DEADLINE: Sept. 1

The "Life After Residency" event is sponsored through the Florida College of Emergency Physicians (FCEP) and is offered to all residency programs. For more information, including the workshop topics that will be covered, CLICK HERE.

Confirm your participation in the 2014 Emergency Medicine Life After Residency workshop by contacting your residency program coordinator.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article



REGISTER NOW!



Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


November 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS


Medicare Speaks 2014, in Panama City on Nov. 5-6, 2014

Learn what’s trending now in Medicare.

First Coast Service Options (First Coast), the Medicare administrative contract (MAC) for Florida, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands, invites you to join our signature education event: Medicare Speaks 2014.

This event is for Part A and B Medicare providers and their billing and compliance representatives. You will benefit from data-driven content based on the latest Medicare changes that you need to know to bill Medicare the right way, the first time.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Former ACEP Member Killed in Car Crash
WESH-TV
A doctor who saved many patients in the Central Florida Regional Hospital Emergency Room died in an early morning crash Aug. 23. Dr. David Briones was on his way home from his night shift when a vehicle going the wrong way on SR 417 collided with his car. Briones, and the 30-year old driver of the other car, Noel Torres Alvarado, died at the scene. The Florida Highway Patrol says the two drivers were the only occupants of their vehicles.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


2 US hospitals report patients undergoing Ebola tests
Bloomberg
Blood samples from two patients at separate U.S. hospitals are being tested for Ebola as countries in West Africa struggle to contain the worst-ever outbreak of the disease. Health officials from both states said neither person is likely to have the disease. Officials at the hospitals, in New Mexico and California, said yesterday that as a precaution they are sending the samples to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to rule out the presence of the virus.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Accuracy + No Drops + No Calibration = ER Friendly
Icare tonometry provides accuracy, speed and care patients need when it matters the most. For more information or demo, call 813.505.3495, email focirth@aol.com MORE
Wellsoft EDIS...
is best for clinicians. Speed, ease of use & full integration with your HIS, Wellsoft improves workflow, decreases liability, optimizes revenue. MORE


Futile treatment makes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds
News-Medical
Providing futile treatment in the intensive care unit sets off a chain reaction that causes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds, according to a study by researchers from UCLA and RAND Health. The study is the first to show that when unbeneficial medical care is provided, others who might be able to benefit from treatment are harmed, said study lead author Dr. Thanh Huynh, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


When patients read what their doctors write
NPR
The woman was sitting on a gurney in the emergency room, and I was facing her, typing. I had just written about her abdominal pain when she posed a question I'd never been asked before: "May I take a look at what you're writing?" At the time, I was a fourth-year medical resident in Boston. In our ER, doctors routinely typed visit notes, placed orders and checked past records while we were in patients' rooms. To maintain at least some eye contact, we faced our patients, with the computer between us.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Patients with 2 or more ED visits in 1 year account for disproportionate costs
News-Medical
Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments (EDs) in Florida and California during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care. A study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators also finds that patients with frequent ED visits for the syndrome accounted for more than half of all such ED visits and hospitalizations, contributing to significant healthcare costs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Bronchiolitis, deception in research and clinical decision making
JAMA
Bronchiolitis is a viral lower respiratory tract infection characterized by increased respiratory effort and wheeze in young infants. Optimal clinical management has been difficult to define because bronchiolitis is a heterogeneous clinical condition and definitive research is lacking. During the past 3 decades, racemic epinephrine, bronchodilators, oral corticosteroids, inhaled corticosteroids, normal saline and hypertonic normal saline have been suggested as potential therapeutic options for bronchiolitis, but a single best practice has not emerged.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apps that find the least busy ER are on the wrong track
By Alan Kelsky
Emergency departments would do well to tell their potential patient population that smartphone apps featuring which neighborhood ER is the least busy are generally a waste of money. For patients with the sniffles, this might be useful information — although it is a waste of money and the ER's time for such a minor ailment. Go to an urgent care center. Public service announcements that all ERs sponsor should carry this message.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Are clinicians ready for ICD-10 documentation requirements?
EHRIntelligence
Over the past two years, hospitals have invested in modifying applications and workflows to fit the demands of ICD-10. And many have ramped up training on the detailed documentation that the new coding system requires. But a February survey by the Medical Group Management Association indicated that only 10 percent of physician practices were prepared for the change, and a lack of familiarity with the new documentation demands was part of the issue. Documentation remains an Achilles heel for many hospital ICD-10 conversion plans.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why emergency room visits by asthmatic kids peaks in September
Global News
During the third week of September, just as kids get back into the routine of school, the number of children with asthma who are taken to hospital emergency rooms spikes, according to the Lung Association. Roughly 16 percent of Canadian children under the age of 12 have asthma, a common condition which can make breathing incredibly difficult when it flares up. Asthma symptoms can often be triggered by allergens – like mold, dust, pets or ragweed – and irritants like cold air, smoke or air pollution.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Informatics shows pain leads to repeated emergency department visits
Anesthesiology News
The primary culprit in postoperative visits to the emergency department is pain, according to a recent analysis by North Carolina researchers who used medical informatics to identify and improve shortcomings in patient care. “There’s a lot in the news lately about improving health care outcomes,” said Dinesh J. Kurian, M.D., a resident at Duke University Medical Center, in Durham, North Carolina “At our institution, we’ve noticed that some of our patients are high emergency department utilizers — people who keep coming back over and over without ever seeming to get their problems solved.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stem cell treatment presents challenges in neurology
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
In most neurologic conditions, injury to neural cells is followed by an immune response to the damage and consequential neurodegeneration. However, due to different genetic backgrounds, the disease manifestation could be different in each individual. Therefore, it would be ideal to design individualized therapy for each patient suffering the relevant signs and symptoms. Repairing the central nervous system (CNS) and the reconstruction of the damaged neural network require the removal of etiological factors in the first place, followed by inflammatory response modulation, protection of neural cells from degeneration, and rebuilding the network connections.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


More hospitals use the healing powers of public art
The Wall Street Journal
Researchers are learning more about the precise ways paintings and other works of art help patients and families in the healing process. With studies showing a direct link between the content of images and the brain's reaction to pain, stress, and anxiety, hospitals are considering and choosing artworks based on the evidence and giving it a higher priority than merely decoration for sterile rooms and corridors.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AHA clarifies when non-MDs may supervise cardiac stress tests
Medscape (free login required)
Nonphysicians with appropriate training and sufficient experience may safely conduct and oversee cardiac stress tests without a physician being present in the room, but a physician must be there when a high-risk patient is being tested. This recommendation is spelled out in a new AHA scientific statement on the supervision of clinical exercise testing by nonphysicians — which includes clinical exercise physiologists, registered nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and physical therapists.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Common coding mistakes hospitalists should avoid
The Hospitalist
Medical decision-making (MDM) mistakes are common. The author lists the coding and documentation mistakes hospitalists make most often, along with some tips on how to avoid them.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New hydrogel drug delivery helps prevents transplant rejection
By Lynn Hetzler
Clinicians currently use systemic immunosuppression in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA). While VCA can be a superior method of restoring the function and aesthetics of transplants, it can also cause significant side effects and negatively affect the quality of life for transplant patients. Scientists have now developed a means to administer immunosuppressant drugs locally. Furthermore, the researchers found a way to package the immunosuppressant drugs to release medication only when prompted by inflammation.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The question doctors can't ask (The Atlantic)
Some health insurers raise 2015 Florida exchange rates (The Associated Press via WTVT-TV)
New test predicts individual's risk of a second kidney stone (Health eCareers)
Emergency department visits, hospitalizations due to insulin (The Hospitalist)
With health law, emergency rooms still packed (The Inquirer via Philly.com)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
Contribute news


Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the FCEP EMnews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

Aug. 20, 2014
Aug. 6, 2014
July 31, 2014
July 23, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063