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FCEP NEWS


FCEP/FEMF Capital Campaign Update

The Emergency Medicine Learning and Resource Center (EMLRC), future home of FCEP and FEMF, is well under way towards its completion. However, continued support is needed to be able to reach 2 million in 3 years, which will enable lifesaving education and advocacy for emergency physicians and all EMS personnel in the state of Florida and beyond to continue. FCEP members are strongly encouraged to become a part of the platform to build support not only to cover the cost of the new center, but to ensure that this vital work carries on. FCEP president, Dr. Ashley Booth-Norse, will be sending out a call-to-action letter within the next week. Please consider carefully how you feel called to take part in the Capital Campaign.


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FCEP COMMITTEE AND BOARD MEETINGS


MEETING LOCATION

Orlando Marriott Lake Mary
1501 International Pkwy
Lake Mary, FL 32746

Make hotel reservations by calling 1-800-380-7724 and mentioning the EMLRC 2014 Stroke Program. The cut-off date for room block reservations is Oct. 23, 2014.

MEETING SCHEDULE

COMMITTEE MEETINGS - Wednesday, Nov. 12
    9 a.m. — EMS/Trauma
    10 a.m. — Medical Economics
    11:30 a.m. — Government Affairs
    1 p.m. — Membership & Professional Development
Lunch will be served.

Note: FCEP/FEMF Education & Academic Affairs Committee meeting time to be determined.

BOARD MEETINGS - Thursday, Nov. 13
    9 a.m. — FCEP Board of Directors
    1 p.m. — FEMF Board of Directors
Lunch will be served.

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REGISTER NOW!



Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


Nov. 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care. To view the brochure for this event, click here.

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SAVE THE DATE!

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


New ACEP Fellows in Florida
FCEP wishes to congratulate soon to be honored ACEP Fellows in Florida. These individuals will be recognized at the upcoming ACEP Scientific Assembly in Chicago. On behalf of FCEP Board, thank you for your service and dedication to emergency medicine and the patients you care for.
Miles Bennett, DO
Javier Ignacio Gonzalez, M.D.
Omar Hammad, M.D.
Carolyn K. Holland, M.D., Med
Corinne S. Jackson, M.D.
Stacey L. Kaciuban, M.D.
Shaila Kirpalani, M.D.
Ben S. Lenhart, M.D.
Rajneesh Mathur, DO
David Mishkin, M.D.
Richard Petrik, M.D.
Matthew F. Ryan, M.D., Ph.D.
Rebecca Ryszkiewicz, M.D.
Michael T. Schultz, M.D.
Nathaniel Stephens, DO
Ashraf Nashaat Thabet, DO
Aaron Anthony Wohl, M.D.


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Free Standing Emergency Departments
Click here to see the list of FSEDs as of July.
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An op-ed piece by FCEP President Dr. Ashley Booth-Norse
Tampa Bay Times
Emergency care safety net frayed
Emergency departments are the health care safety net for everyone, not just the uninsured. In Florida, more than 7 million people were cared for by emergency physicians last year. Yet there are many misconceptions about the costs and efficiencies of emergency rooms. For example, according to U.S. government statistics, emergency care represents less than 2 percent of the $2.4 trillion spent on health care. In addition, there were more than 130 million visits to the nation's nearly 4,000 emergency departments in 2009. Two-thirds of these visits occurred after business hours and on weekends and holidays when doctors' offices were closed. Ninety-two percent of emergency visits were from very sick patients who needed care within two hours.

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In Miami-Dade, hope, help for offenders with mental illness
Miami Herald
For more than a decade, authorities have pushed for a trail-blazing treatment facility that could spare Miami’s mentally ill from the county jail’s notoriously nightmarish psychiatric ward. Finally, the plan might become reality. The Miami-Dade County Commission this month gave a preliminary OK to fast-track design and construction for a new Mental Health Diversion Facility, with final approval expected during the next meeting.
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Attorney General Pam Bondi: Florida's pill mill doctors are gone
Miami Herald
Attorney General Pam Bondi has launched her reelection advertising campaign with a major milestone in Florida law enforcement: The death of the state’s infamous “pill mills.” In a Sept. 8 television commercial, the incumbent touts her record of overseeing the demise of rampant prescription drug abuse enabled by Florida doctors. “With our amazing law enforcement, we closed down the pill mills,” Bondi said. “Of the top 100 oxycodone-dispensing doctors in this country, 98 of them lived in Florida. Today, there are none.” That statistic implies Bondi was tough on crime, but PolitiFact Florida wanted to know if it was accurate.
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Newly-expanded ER at Florida Hospital Kissimmee opens its doors
WFTV-TV
The newly-expanded emergency department at Florida Hospital Kissimmee opened its doors. The expansion has more than doubled the hospital bed count. Florida Hospital said the expansion will help meet a real need in the community. Florida hospital Kissimmee celebrated the grand opening of its $7 million emergency room expansion, nearly tripling its size.
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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


What makes hospital patients turn violent?
Reuters
It's common for patients to come into a hospital with injuries, but too often they’re the ones inflicting injury on nurses, technicians and security guards, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed incident reports of patient violence to identify the situations most likely to lead to a physical conflict, in the hope of training hospital staff to avert the attacks.
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The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022
By Dorothy L. Tengler
On Monday, Oct. 6, 2009, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 800 points, closing below 10,000 for the first time since 2004. America was in recession. Since then, the nation's labor market has at least partially recovered. So far in 2014, the United States has added nearly 1.6 million jobs. And through 2022, employment is expected to grow by more than 15 million jobs, or by 11 percent.
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CDC urges all adults to get flu vaccination
News-medical
Influenza vaccination coverage estimates show an encouraging upward trend overall, but coverage among healthy 18 to 64 year-olds has yet to top 40 percent, according to new data announced at a news conference held recently by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Studies show adults may not seek vaccination because they think influenza poses no risk to them, but public health officials point out that flu hit the 18- to 64-year-old age group hard last season, with the highest flu-related hospitalization rates in this age group since the 2009 pandemic.
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3 considerations for hospitals dealing with infectious disease
Becker's Infection Control & Clinical Quality
When highly contagious diseases emerge, spread and present in hospital settings, the first hurdle hospitals need to overcome is the ability to treat the disease from a clinical standpoint. Can the facility handle treating a patient with Ebola, for example, or do clinicians know what to do for a patient with MERS? After clearing that obstacle, however, hospitals need to be concerned with the business aspect of treating patients with a high-profile infectious disease.
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New test detects concussion impairments easily overlooked
Chicago Tribune
Researchers at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a simple new test that can detect symptoms of a concussion current tests often miss. The new test concerns the vestibular ocular system, which is responsible for integrating vision, balance and movement. The test allows clinicians to be 90 percent accurate in identifying patients with a concussion. The test can be added to current assessment methods such as physical examination, symptom evaluation and computerized neurocognitive testing.
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Wearable artificial kidney hopes to transform treatment
KING-TV
VideoBrief A medical breakthrough aims to transform the lives of millions of people living with kidney disease. The clinical trial and research on the Wearable Artificial Kidney (WAK) is happening at Seattle's University of Washington Kidney Institute Research. The inventors and UW Kidney researchers just got the green light from the Food and Drug Administration to launch the first clinical trial in Seattle. The miniaturized, battery-powered dialysis machine straps on like a tool belt, filtering the blood of people whose kidneys aren't functioning properly. Patients would no longer have to be tethered to a huge dialysis machine three times a week for hours at a time.
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Study suggests common painkillers tied to blood clot risk
HealthDay News
People who use painkillers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — which include aspirin, naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) — may be at increased risk for potentially deadly blood clots, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed the results of six studies involving more than 21,000 cases of a type of blood clot called a venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots include deep vein thrombosis (a clot in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (a clot in the lungs). But the study only showed an association between use of the painkillers and higher clotting risk; it did not prove cause-and-effect.
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Study: 1 in 10 antibiotics prescriptions fail
Medical News Today
The results of a 20-year study published in the BMJ finds that 1 in 10 of all antibiotic prescriptions fail to treat the infection. This marks an increase in the number of antibiotic failures, which is continuing to rise. Over the past 20 years, there has been such a sharp increase in strains of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics that the World Health Organization have declared the issue a global public health crisis. Despite this, primary care clinicians rarely report problems of antibiotic resistance in their own practices.
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Fast-paced battle to save lives draws many to emergency nursing
The Houston Chornicle
Deena Brecher, MSN, RN, APN, a graduate of UT-Health School of Nursing and president of the 40,000-member Emergency Nurses Association, said there's been much interest in emergency nursing. "We go to the national student nurses meeting each year and the emergency nursing session has been standing room only for many years," she said. Still, as the nation continues to struggle with shortages of nurses across the spectrum, more emergency nurses are needed.
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Brain chemical may help control Tourette 'tics'
HealthDay News
A particular brain chemical may help people with Tourette syndrome suppress the disorder's characteristic "tics," scientists report. They hope their discovery paves the way to new therapies for the developmental neurological disorder. Researchers took brain scans of 15 teenagers with Tourette and a group of teens without the disorder. The investigators found that the Tourette group had higher levels of a brain chemical called GABA in one area of the brain — the supplementary motor area (SMA), which is involved in planning and performing movement.
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Report: Hospitals will save $5.7 billion on uncompensated care
FierceHealthcare
Hospitals' uncompensated care costs will fall nearly $6 billion in the wake of the Affordable Care Act, according to a report from the Department of Health and Human Services. Hospitals will save $5.7 billion in uncompensated care costs, according to the report, with 74 percent of those savings, or about $4.2 billion, going to states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA. Hospitals in non-expansion states will save as much as $1.5 billion.
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New prescription drug abuse resource available
National Council on Patient Information and Education
The National Council on Patient Information and Education announces a new online guide designed to help communities prevent prescription drug abuse. The guide organizes resources into four categories: prescription drug abuse awareness, prevention, treatment, and recovery. It provides links to information appropriate for individuals, healthcare professionals, and communities in need.
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Memory complaints could be early indicator of future dementia risk
Medical News Today
Memory slips are regarded by most as a sign of the onset of old age. However, new research has found that those who report memory issues may have an increased chance of developing dementia later on, even if they do not have any outward clinical signs of the disease. "Our study adds strong evidence to the idea that memory complaints are common among older adults and are sometimes indicators of future memory and thinking problems. [Clinicians] should not minimize these complaints and should take them seriously," says study author Richard Kryscio, from the University of Kentucky in Lexington.
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Kidney diseased not always a barrier to tPA
MedPage Today
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with intravenous thrombolytic therapy during ischemic stroke had a higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage and serious systemic hemorrhage, but the risk did not appear to be related to their renal disease, researchers reported. In a study of more than 44,000 patients that examined the safety of IV tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy in stroke patients, the presence of CKD (versus no CKD) was not associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.0, 95 percent CI 0.91-1.10, P=0.9510) or serious systemic hemorrhage (adjusted OR 0.97, 95 percent CI 0.80-1.18, P=0.7924), after adjusting for age and comorbidities linked to negative outcomes, according to researchers.
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Use of cardiac telemetry can be reduced
MedPage Today
A Delaware healthcare system was able to reduce its use of cardiac telemetry by 70 percent without affecting patient safety by integrating American Heart Association guidelines into their electronic ordering system (EOS), saving the provider millions of dollars. Non-intensive-care use of cardiac telemetry to detect arrhythmia is among the most overused diagnostic tests in cardiovascular medicine, as evidenced by its appearance in March of 2013 on the Society of Hospital Medicine's "Choose Wisely" list of top five tests and practices that are widely performed but have questionable value to patients.
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How engaging patients can improve care and health outcomes
Health Affairs
Patients and caregivers are gaining momentum as powerful new resources in efforts to improve the healthcare system. They are increasingly becoming active partners in their own care, as well as seeking to make the healthcare delivery system more responsive to their needs and easier to navigate. And they are increasingly engaging as collaborators in planning and conducting research, and disseminating its results, with the goal of producing evidence that can help patients and those who care for them make better-informed decisions about the clinical choices they face.
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Enterovirus-D68 is now coast to coast
Medscape (free login required)
The once rare type of enterovirus that has landed hundreds if not thousands of children in the hospital with acute respiratory problems has spread coast to coast to 22 states, up from 6 just a week ago, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For all its explosive growth, enterovirus-D68 has not resulted in any deaths.
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Colectomy for chronic constipation: A rising trend causes alarm
General Surgery News
Colectomy as a treatment for chronic constipation is on the rise, but the surgery puts patients at risk for potentially serious perioperative complications with little evidence for long-term benefit, new research shows. Anwar Dudekula, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who helped conduct the study, said treatment guidelines include the use of surgical approaches, with subtotal colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis in patients with slow-transit constipation. However, he questioned whether surgical modalities are worth the associated risks, and suggested that the recommendations warranted reconsideration in light of the new findings.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    HCA to close Florida hospital as inpatient volumes dwindle (Modern Healthcare)
Variation in hospitalizations from ER costs billions (Medical News Today)
Andrew Sauer an emergency room doctor and medical malpractice attorney (The Florida Times-Union)
Malnourishment among elders undetected in ER (The Boston Globe)
ER waiting times vary significantly, studies find (HealthDay News via The Philadelphia Inquirer)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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