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FCEP NEWS


FCEP/FEMF Capital Campaign Update

The Emergency Medicine Learning and Resource Center (EMLRC), future home of FCEP and FEMF, is well under way towards its completion. However, continued support is needed to be able to reach 2 million in 3 years, which will enable lifesaving education and advocacy for emergency physicians and all EMS personnel in the state of Florida and beyond to continue. FCEP members are strongly encouraged to become a part of the platform to build support not only to cover the cost of the new center, but to ensure that this vital work carries on. FCEP president, Dr. Ashley Booth-Norse, will be sending out a call-to-action letter within the next week. Please consider carefully how you feel called to take part in the Capital Campaign.


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FCEP COMMITTEE AND BOARD MEETINGS


MEETING LOCATION

Orlando Marriott Lake Mary
1501 International Pkwy
Lake Mary, FL 32746

Make hotel reservations by calling 1-800-380-7724 and mentioning the EMLRC 2014 Stroke Program. The cut-off date for room block reservations is Oct. 23, 2014.

MEETING SCHEDULE

COMMITTEE MEETINGS - Wednesday, Nov. 12
    9 a.m. — EMS/Trauma
    10 a.m. — Medical Economics
    11:30 a.m. — Government Affairs
    1 p.m. — Membership & Professional Development
Lunch will be served.

Note: FCEP/FEMF Education & Academic Affairs Committee meeting time to be determined.

BOARD MEETINGS - Thursday, Nov. 13
    9 a.m. — FCEP Board of Directors
    1 p.m. — FEMF Board of Directors
Lunch will be served.

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Why should you attend this program?
Listen to what program chair, Dr. Jay Falk has to say ...



REGISTER NOW!

Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


Nov. 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care. To view the brochure for this event, click here.

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SAVE THE DATE!

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


Be sure to Vote ... Election Day is rapidly approaching
FCEP would like to share a list of candidates we are supporting through our Political Action Committees, Physicians for Emergency Care (PEC) and Emergency Care for Florida (ECF).

To see the list of State Senator General Election 2014, click here.
To see the list of State Representative General Election 2014, click here.

If you would like to contribute to our PAC’s here is the link to the FCEP website/PC, click here.

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Representative Pigman Addresses EM Residents on Advocacy; Touts Simulation Training
By Kevin Fritz
Florida House Representative Cary Pigman, an emergency medicine physician in Avon Park, treated residents preparing post-residency life to a special presentation Oct. 1 at the Embassy Suites Orlando. Addressing the importance of advocacy in the field of emergency medicine at the annual “Life After Residency” workshop presented by the Florida College of Emergency Physicians, Pigman noted that at least one person in the room packed with residents would one day run for office.
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Detailed Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Checklist for Ebola Preparedness
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), in addition to other federal, state, and local partners, aim to increase understanding of Ebola and encourage U.S.-based EMS agencies and systems to prepare for managing patients with Ebola and other infectious diseases. Every EMS agency and system, including those that provide non-emergency and/or inter-facility transport, should ensure that their personnel can detect a person under investigation (PUI) for Ebola, protect themselves so they can safely care for the patient, and respond in a coordinated fashion.
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Evaluating patients for possible Ebola virus disease: Recommendations for healthcare personnel and health officials
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The purpose of this HAN Advisory is to remind healthcare personnel and health officials to: (1) increase their vigilance in inquiring about a history of travel to West Africa in the 21 days before illness onset for any patient presenting with fever or other symptoms consistent with Ebola; (2) isolate patients who report a travel history to an Ebola-affected country and who are exhibiting Ebola symptoms in a private room with a private bathroom and implement standard, contact, and droplet precautions (gowns, facemask, eye protection and gloves); and (3) immediately notify the local/state health department.
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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30. The CDC and other key government officials have converged on the Dallas metropolitan area as contacts are identified and educated on signs and symptoms of the disease. As the story unfolded, hospital officials confirmed that the patient had told a hospital nurse of his recent travel from Liberia before being released from the hospital. It appears a few lessons can be learned from this situation. Unfortunately, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost — human lives.
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Limb frailty in children is studied for link to virus
The New York Times
Driven by a handful of reports of poliolike symptoms in children, federal health officials have asked the nation’s physicians to report cases of children with limb weakness or paralysis along with specific spinal-cord abnormalities on a magnetic resonance imaging test. As a respiratory illness known as enterovirus 68 is sickening thousands of children from coast to coast, officials are trying to figure out if the weakness could be linked to the virus.
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Study: When EDs close, mortality risks climb at nearby hospitals
By Karen Zabel
Researchers at University of California San Francisco recently released data demonstrating that when an emergency department closes, the effects can be far-reaching. The study examined 16 million emergency admissions in California between 1999 and 2010. According to the results, patients who were admitted to a hospital in an area where an ED had recently closed had a 5 percent higher chance of dying compared to patients admitted to hospitals that were not located near recently closed EDs.
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Head injuries linked to more trouble for teens
CBS News
Teenagers who have experienced a traumatic brain injury are much more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behaviors, Canadian researchers report. Both boys and girls were more likely to smoke, use drugs, drink alcohol and get poor grades after they endured a blow to the head that knocked them out for longer than five minutes or landed them in the hospital for a day or more, the study found.
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Mental health drugs: High risk for adverse events
Healthcare Professionals Network
Prescription medications for mental health diagnoses (e.g. antidepressants, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers) consume approximately 25 percent of commercial health insurers’ pharmacy budgets and almost 35 percent of public payers’ pharmacy spending. In 2011, an estimated 26.8 million U.S. adults — more than 11 percent — took prescription medications for mental illness. A new study in the September 2014 issue of JAMA Psychiatry reports American emergency departments (ED) see patients who take these medications often. What are they seeing? Adverse drug events (ADE).
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Appropriate use criteria established for pediatric ECHO
HealthDay News
Appropriate use criteria have been developed for the initial use of transthoracic echocardiography in outpatient pediatric cardiology. The guidelines were published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. In an effort to help clinicians in the care of children with possible heart disease, Robert Campbell, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues established and evaluated appropriate use criteria for the initial use of outpatient pediatric echocardiography.
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New strategies may boost patient compliance
MedPage Today
Healthcare providers are missing lots of opportunities to improve medication adherence, several speakers said at a conference on patient engagement sponsored by MedCity Media. Nick Katopodis, an executive at StoneArch, a Minneapolis-based medical marketing firm, said at a panel discussion that one missed opportunity he often sees is that providers fail to point out to patients that their medication adherence affects not only them but also their caregivers. "Sometimes the patient is more concerned about you as a caregiver," Katopodis said.
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Mental Illness Awareness Week puts spotlight on treatment
By Jessica Taylor
A judge in Alexandria, Virginia, recently found a cab driver not guilty of shooting a police officer in the head during an attack last year. The judge stated that the cab driver, Kashif Bashir, did not understand what he was doing when he shot the officer in the head. Bashir had long suffered from paranoid schizophrenia, and the court determined he was insane at the time of the shooting. This illness and many others are being put into spotlight during Mental Illness Awareness Week. The first full week of October was established by Congress in 1990 as MIAW in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness' efforts to raise mental illness awareness.
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Comprehensive study: Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in US
ScienceDaily
Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years.
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High blood sugar may worsen spinal cord injury
HealthNewsDigest
Scientists have discovered yet another reason to curb sugar consumption: high levels of it in the blood may make recovery after spinal cord injury harder. Controlling blood sugar levels in patients with spinal cord injury could potentially help doctors prevent additional neurological deterioration. In mice models of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and in a retrospective analysis of human patients, researchers found a link between hyperglycemia and poorer outcomes after spinal cord injury.
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An ingestible pill with needles could be the new form of injection
Medical News Today
Imagine swallowing a pill with tiny needles instead of getting an injection. Then again, just imagine swallowing a pill with tiny needles. It may sound painful, but according to the researchers who developed the novel capsule — which could replace painful injections — there are no harmful side effects. The researchers, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital, have published the results of a study that tested the microneedle pill in the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of pigs.
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ED visits for drug-related suicide attempts on rise
Psychiatric News
Two new reports from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) suggest that suicide attempts are increasing — particularly among certain age groups — and that a substantial number of these events are associated with prescription and over-the-counter drugs. SAMHSA’s Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), a public surveillance system that monitors drug-related emergency department (ED) hospital visits, conducted a comparative analysis on the number of visits to an ED for drug-related suicide attempts from 2005 to 2011.
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Hospital infections with C. difficile level off
HealthLeaders Media
The incidence of the potentially deadly bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile doubled in hospitals between 2001 and 2010, researchers report, and leveled off between 2008 and 2010. C. difficile is a hospital-acquired infection linked to 14,000 deaths a year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the main cause is the overuse of antibiotics. Using hospital discharge data on about 2.2 million people, average age 75, the scientists found that about a third had a principal diagnosis of C. difficile infection. Two thirds had other primary diagnoses. Incidence increased to 8.2 per thousand in 2008, the peak year, from 4.5 per thousand in 2001. It then decreased slightly though 2010.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What makes hospital patients turn violent? (Reuters)
Attorney General Pam Bondi: Florida's pill mill doctors are gone (Miami Herald)
Newly-expanded ER at Florida Hospital Kissimmee opens its doors (WFTV-TV)
An op-ed piece by FCEP President Dr. Ashley Booth-Norse (Tampa Bay Times)
The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022 (By Dorothy L. Tengler)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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