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FCEP NEWS


FCEP/FEMF Capital Campaign: New Building Photos



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FCEP COMMITTEE AND BOARD MEETINGS


MEETING LOCATION

Orlando Marriott Lake Mary
1501 International Pkwy
Lake Mary, FL 32746

Make hotel reservations by calling 1-800-380-7724.

MEETING SCHEDULE

COMMITTEE MEETINGS - Wednesday, Nov. 12
    9 a.m. — EMS/Trauma
    10 a.m. — Medical Economics
    11:30 a.m. — Government Affairs
    1 p.m. — Membership & Professional Development
    2 p.m. — EMRAF
    3 p.m. — FCEP/FEMF Education and Academic Affairs
Lunch will be served.

BOARD MEETINGS - Thursday, Nov. 13
    9 a.m. — FCEP Board of Directors
    1 p.m. — FEMF Board of Directors
Lunch will be served.

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Why should you attend this program?
Listen to what program chair, Dr. Jay Falk has to say ...



REGISTER NOW!

Emergency Care of Stroke Patients 2014:
Defining the State of the Art and the Science


Nov. 13-14, 2014
Orlando, FL

All providers involved with acute care as well as hospital managers and administrators will benefit from this dynamic program that provides a comprehensive overview of best practices in acute stroke care. To view the brochure for this event, click here.

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CALL FOR FCEP COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Participation on an FCEP Committee is an essential part of our program activity. Committees help us with important initiatives such as setting our legislative and regulatory priorities. They also help us to identify clinical issues affecting patients and our members.

I encourage you to consider serving on an FCEP Committee. It is a great way to learn about how others are dealing with hospital ED issues and to help FCEP remain strong in so many areas.

Committees typically meet quarterly, in conjunction with FCEP Board meetings:

DATES AND LOCATIONS:
Nov. 12, 2014 — Orlando Marriott Lake Mary
Feb. 18, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
May 20, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
Aug. 6, 2015 — Symposium by the Sea, Amelia Island

Please use these links to connect to the Committee Interest Form and view the Committee Objectives.

Sincerely,

Ashley Booth-Norse, M.D. FACEP
President

Note to our members currently participating on committees: We ask that you please also submit a committee interest form to renew your committee membership.

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SAVE THE DATE!


EM Days 2015 Hotel Information
Hotel Duval, Tallahassee, Florida
Group rate: $215/night
Hotel Reservation Deadline: Feb. 10, 2015
Reservation Link: Book your group rate: EM Days 2015 >>

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


PAC Election Results
Click here for the list of candidates that FCEP supported through the political action committees, Physicians for Emergency Care and Emergency Care for Florida.
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Florida gears up for Obamacare, round 2
Insurance News Net
The rollout of the Affordable Care Act last year avoided disaster only thanks to a late surge of signups that saw more than 980,000 Florida residents obtain health coverage, the most of the 36 states using the federally run exchange. A glitchy healthcare.gov website prevented consumers around the nation from signing up early and nearly derailed President Barack Obama's signature piece of legislation.
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Hospital volunteers raise millions for medical needs
Miami Herald
In South Florida, volunteer fundraising for hospitals is a serious, multimillion-dollar endeavor. Take the Pap Corps, a 21,000-member organization, which in May handed the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center a check for $4.5million to fund research and hire faculty. The volunteer-based Guardian Angels is expected to raise more than $3million this year as part of Jackson Health Foundation; the money will help renovate Holtz Children’s Hospital’s hemotology/oncology unit.
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Medical marijuana proposal falls short
WUSF-TV
Little more than three months ago, Floridians appeared poised to overwhelmingly pass a constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana. But, after a barrage of negative ads by opponents, the idea came crashing down. As of 11 p.m., 57.5 percent of voters backed the proposed amendment — known as Amendment 2 — that would have allowed patients to receive the substance. But constitutional amendments require approval from 60 percent of voters to pass.
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Woman 'spontaneously' revives after 45 minutes without a pulse
The Washington Post
They are calling it "a miracle." Doctors at Boca Raton Regional Hospital in Florida have no way to explain how 40-year-old Ruby Graupera-Cassimiro survived after spending 45 minutes without a pulse and enduring three hours of attempts to bring her back from near-death on Sept. 23. Graupera-Cassimiro, now a mother of two, had just come out of a cesarean section procedure to deliver her new daughter. Then suddenly, she went from chattering with her family to struggling for her life, according to the Sun Sentinel.
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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


Prevention is key: Workplace violence in the hospital
By Keith Carlson
With the recent news of several nurses in a Minnesota hospital being injured by a patient wielding a metal bar, the issue of healthcare workers facing violence in the workplace is again receiving media scrutiny. Those employed in emergency departments understand they are particularly subject to the emotional volatility of patients who may face long waits in particularly busy facilities. However, the recent events in Minnesota demonstrate that a normal medical-surgical unit is not immune from such violence.
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Study: Newer pneumonia vaccine for kids beats older version
HealthDay News
A new pneumococcal vaccine is almost 30 percent more effective than its previous version in preventing hospitalizations of young children for pneumonia, a new study shows. The vaccine — called PCV13 — protects against 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria, which is the leading cause of pneumonia in children younger than 5. Introduced in 2010, the new vaccine improved upon a seven-strain version that had been used since 2000. The introduction of that vaccine led to a more than 40 percent decline in childhood hospitalizations for pneumonia, according to background information in the study.
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How technology can help contain an outbreak
By Jared Hill
Hollywood has trained most of us to envision what happens during an epidemic. We see the first case of a disease, which seems innocuous to the people in the film. Then it spreads with increasing velocity, until it almost outpaces or completely overwhelms the systems in place to prevent it. In real life, however, disease control experts have fended off quite a few potentially disastrous contagious diseases — often with cutting-edge technology at their disposal.
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High blood pressure ER visits are on the rise
TWC News
Around 67 million American adults have high blood pressure &mdash that’s 1 of every 3 adults. And only about half have their condition under control. "It can cause stroke. It can predispose people to heart attacks and heart failure. It is a very common cause of kidney failure, leading people to needing life-long dialysis or a kidney transplant, so obviously, I would say this is amongst the most important medical conditions we need to treat," said Dr. Apurv Khanna, the Upstate Medical University Complex Hypertension Program Director.
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Telepsychiatry brings help to remote patients
InformationWeek
Telehealth technology is expanding access to affordable mental health services. In many regions, qualified professionals are scarce, insurance coverage varies, wait times are long, and appointments are frequently scheduled during work or school hours. Only about 20 percent of adults with mental health disorders see mental health specialists. Others go untreated or see general practitioners for help.
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Revolutionary new antibiotic alternative could save the world from superbug 'apocalypse'
Newsweek
Scientists have developed a new alternative to antibiotics that could revolutionise the way we treat superbugs and avoid a scenario where common medical procedures become life-threatening due to bacteria becoming immune to conventional drugs. Mark Offerhaus, the CEO of the Dutch Biotech company Micreos, which developed the drug, has said that the advance signals "a new era in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria."
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NICU evacuation: Disaster planning critical
Medscape (free login required)
The evacuation of 21 critically ill infants down nine flights of stairs at New York University Langone Medical Center the night of Oct. 29, 2012, is a lasting image of the effect of Hurricane Sandy. An article published online November 10 in Pediatrics reviews the challenges and "lessons learned" from the experience, providing strategies to prepare for the next natural disaster. Because data on evacuating neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are sparse, Michael Espiritu, M.D., and other neonatologists and pediatricians from New York University reconstructed and evaluated exactly what transpired as Sandy struck. They had experienced a small taste of the possible scenario from Hurricane Irene, which had come through 14 months earlier.
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Flu season may bring rise in ER visits over Ebola fears
The Boston Globe
As the flu season gets underway over the next few weeks, public health officials have been preparing for a unique set of challenges. Some people are still looking for a last-minute flu shot due to delays in immunization shipments from two manufacturers, and those experiencing fever, aches, and fatigue from the flu may be more likely to head to the emergency room this year due to concerns about the Ebola virus, which causes similar symptoms.
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Report: Bed position matters for stroke patients, but clear guidelines aren't available
HealthDay News
Hospital bed positioning can be critical in the first 24 hours after a person suffers an ischemic stroke, according to a new report. Researchers summarized the latest research on ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, which occurs when a clot blocks blood flow to the brain. Sitting upright can harm ischemic stroke patients because it decreases blood flow to the brain when it needs more blood, the researchers explained. This would suggest that it's best to keep these patients lying as flat as possible, but strokes can also cause brain swelling that can damage the brain. Keeping patients sitting upright helps improve blood drainage and reduces swelling, the authors noted.
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New plan to send more patients with atrial fibrillation home
Medscape (free login required)
A new clinical tool could help physicians decide which patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation can safely be sent home from the emergency department, according to a new study. Symptomatic atrial fibrillation accounts for nearly 1 percent of visits to the emergency department. Physicians admit nearly 70 percent of these patients, although the risk for stroke or death within 30 days is low — from 1 percent to 3 percent, said Tyler Barrett, M.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.
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Longer hospital stay equals lower mortality, fewer readmissions
FieceHealthcare
One extra day in the hospital cuts costs and significantly reduces the chance of the need to readmit Medicare patients within 30 days, a new study from Columbia Business School found. That extra day slashed the risk of death for patients treated for pneumonia by 22 percent. Mortality for heart attack patients was cut by 7 percent, as were readmission rates, according to an announcement detailing the findings. Overall, the number of heart attack and pneumonia patient lives saved with one more day of hospitalization versus outpatient treatment increased five- to six-fold, the school said. The cost savings came into play when comparing the cost of the extra day of hospitalization with the cost of outpatient care required with an earlier discharge.
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How advancements in ultrasound revolutionized healthcare
MedGadget
VideoBrief New advancements in technology, from CT and MRI scanners to balloon catheters and replacement heart valves, have repeatedly revolutionized clinical care. Usually this is due to brand new capabilities that were simply impossible before the new technology came on the scene. But in certain cases, existing technology that has been around for decades all of a sudden becomes smart and convenient enough to do amazing things that were previously not expected. Such is the case with ultrasound. Here's a talk from this year's TEDMED by Resa Lewiss, Director of Point-of-Care Ultrasound and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, talking about what this has meant for doctors and patients and for treatment of a variety of disease.
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Icatibant spares invasive airway maneuver for angioedema
Medscape (free login required)
Subcutaneous icatibant (Firazyr, Shire) in the emergency department can eliminate the need for invasive airway management in patients with life-threatening angioedema due to cardiac medications, according to a new study. In all seven patients who received the drug, angioedema visibly decreased within an hour of administration, reported lead investigator Mark DeBard, M.D., from the Ohio State University Wexler Medical Center in Columbus.
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Slideshow: Healthcare leaders explore emergency department solutions
Health Leaders Media
The emergency department is one of the most vital components of a healthcare organization. The ED presents a number of challenges, as healthcare leaders must find ways to produce optimal outcomes and improve patient satisfaction, while reducing wait times. Four senior healthcare executives discuss the ways they are trying to improve their EDs, while combating these issues.
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Comfort-focused ER to streamline care, improve patient experience
FierceHealthcare
A new 42,000 square-foot emergency room (ER) at Florida Hospital Tampa's campus will take a new approach to emergency care, according to a report from the Tampa Tribune. ER patients' first stop is a triage room, where physicians examine them, stabilize them and order tests, before moving them to one of 48 private rooms, which include accommodations for family members, the newspaper reported.
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Laundry detergent pods pose poisoning risk to kids, study says
The New York Times
Laundry detergent "pods" seriously sickened more than 700 U.S. children and killed at least one in a recent two-year period, a new report reveals. Poison control centers across the country logged more than 17,000 calls about children exposed to the convenient laundry aids during that same period, researchers also found.
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FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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