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CALL FOR FCEP COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Participation on an FCEP Committee is an essential part of our program activity. Committees help us with important initiatives such as setting our legislative and regulatory priorities. They also help us to identify clinical issues affecting patients and our members.

I encourage you to consider serving on an FCEP Committee. It is a great way to learn about how others are dealing with hospital ED issues and to help FCEP remain strong in so many areas.

Committees typically meet quarterly, in conjunction with FCEP Board meetings:

DATES AND LOCATIONS:
Feb. 18, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
May 20, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
Aug. 6, 2015 — Symposium by the Sea, Amelia Island

Please use these links to connect to the Committee Interest Form and view the Committee Objectives.

Sincerely,

Ashley Booth-Norse, M.D. FACEP
President

Note to our members currently participating on committees: We ask that you please also submit a committee interest form to renew your committee membership.

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SAVE THE DATE!


EM Days 2015 Hotel Information
Hotel Duval, Tallahassee, Florida
Group rate: $215/night
Hotel Reservation Deadline: Feb. 10, 2015
Reservation Link: Book your group rate: EM Days 2015 >>

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


PAC Election Results
Click here for the list of candidates that FCEP supported through the political action committees, Physicians for Emergency Care and Emergency Care for Florida.
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Orlando effort would replace ER visits with housing for homeless
Orlando Sentinel
When outreach workers begin placing chronically homeless people in free apartments next year, it won't be hard to figure out who makes the list. The plan to bring enough permanent supportive housing to Orlando to cut the area's chronically homeless population in half will target the relatively small group of people on the streets who have frequent flier status at the area's hospital emergency rooms.
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Some new frustrations in Florida as health exchange opens
The New York Times
The health insurance marketplace opened for business on Saturday and performed much better than last year, but some consumers reported long, frustrating delays in trying to buy insurance and gain access to their own accounts at HealthCare.gov. Thousands of people attended hundreds of enrollment events around the country at public libraries, churches, shopping malls, community colleges, clinics, hospitals and other sites.
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Florida gets D grade for preterm births
Miami Herald
The day after her baby shower in the Dominican Republic, Carla Curiel experienced a pair of painful contractions. She was about to give birth to twins — less than six months into her pregnancy. Curiel had emergency surgery to close her cervix and then traveled by air ambulance to Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Her babies were born seven weeks later, weighing less than three pounds each.
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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


Surprise results in medical tests draw new focus
The Wall Street Journal
The patient comes in for a checkup on the lungs, and a scan reveals a clogged artery. A test for a teen’s concussion finds a brain tumor. An X-ray of an ER patient’s broken ribs shows a mass on the kidneys. They are all known as “incidental findings” because they are abnormalities discovered unintentionally and not related to the medical condition that prompted the test. They occur in as many as a third of imaging tests, studies show. But they often aren’t followed up on, or even noted in a patient’s record.
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New EHR vendors and technology needed for continued innovation
By Scott E. Rupp
In the span of the last five years, use and implementation of electronic health records in the U.S. has dramatically accelerated because of federal mandates and financial incentives directly related the meaningful use program. Because of these efforts, as well as time and resources invested by healthcare providers, electronic health records are more popular than at any point in the past and are now "the heart of health IT," according to research firm Frost & Sullivan.
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Inoculate your emergency department staff against ICD-10 stress syndrome
ICD10 Monitor
According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were 129.8 million visits to emergency departments across America last year. Almost 38 million were injury-related and 13.3 percent of those seeking treatment were admitted. To put that into perspective, during that same reporting period, the total population of the U.S. was roughly 308 million, meaning that the equivalent of 41 percent of the population visited the emergency room.
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Recommendations for prevention and control of influenza in children, 2014-2015
American Academy of Pediatrics
The purpose of this statement is to update recommendations for routine use of seasonal influenza vaccine and antiviral medications for the prevention and treatment of influenza in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends annual seasonal influenza immunization for all people 6 months and older, including all children and adolescents.
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When patients don't follow up
The New York Times
Patients frequently miss appointments and tests that their healthcare providers schedule. No-show rates range from 5 to 55 percent. In some instances, like when a patient skips a cardiac stress test, for example, then has a heart attack, the hospital might classify what occurred as a "systems error." Ideally, such cases lead to new policies that prevent similar events. But what about less drastic cases, in which follow-up is necessary but not an emergency? Should patients be held responsible for not showing up? Or does the medical profession have an ethical and legal duty to try to track down the individuals?
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Slideshow: Healthcare leaders explore emergency department solutions
Health Leaders Media
The emergency department is one of the most vital components of a healthcare organization. The ED presents a number of challenges, as healthcare leaders must find ways to produce optimal outcomes and improve patient satisfaction, while reducing wait times. Four senior healthcare executives discuss the ways they are trying to improve their EDs, while combating these issues.
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Blood test could reduce antibiotic use
Drug Discovery & Development
A new blood biomarker test that indicates whether bacteria is the cause of a patient’s lung infection is now being studied at UPMC Presbyterian, launching a national multicenter trial. The information could help doctors decide when to prescribe antibiotics and possibly reduce overuse of the drugs, which can lead to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.
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Hand-hygiene compliance drops at the end of shifts
FierceHealthcare
Hospital workers are less likely to wash their hands toward the end of their shifts, according to new research that suggests the lack of compliance is due to fatigue from the demands of the job. Researchers, led by Hengchen Dai, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, analyzed three years of hand-washing data from more than 4,000 caregivers in 35 hospitals across the U.S. They discovered hand-washing compliance rates dropped an average of 8.7 percentage points from the beginning to the end of a typical 12-hour shift, according to the study, published by the American Psychological Association.
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Disparities in cervical cancer show education is still needed
By Jessica Taylor
The Affordable Care Act requires health insurers to provide all cancer screenings for free, with no charge to the patient. If this is the case, why are a majority of women still not getting screened for cervical cancer? The American Cancer Society estimates that 12,360 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed and 4,020 women will die from cervical cancer this year. A recent study from the Centers for Disease and Control Prevention showed that more than half of women diagnosed with cervical cancer had never or rarely been screened.
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Worst Ebola outbreak on record tests global response
Reuters
Global health authorities are struggling to contain the world's worst Ebola epidemic since the disease was identified in 1976. The virus has killed at least 5,160 people.
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ER strategy: Streamlining care for patients with less serious illnesses
FierceHealthcare
Medesto, California-based Memorial Medical Center invested $3.7 million to expand its emergency department to increase space for true emergency patients, while streamlining care for those with less serious illnesses, The Modesto Bee reported. The design includes additional seating in the lobby aimed to reduce patient wait times, while private triage areas allow nurses to speak with patients and physician assistants who can order blood test or X-rays, according to the article.
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Researcher develops an injectable antidote for carbon monoxide poisoning
Medical Xpress
When Joseph Roderique was a first-year student in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, he had an idea for an injectable antidote for carbon monoxide poisoning. It was a big idea, one that could have dramatic and wide-ranging results if he could make it work. One day, Roderique decided to find a lab where he could pursue his brainchild. Starting on the 10th floor of Sanger Hall, he began to knock on the doors of lab directors and pitch them his idea and preliminary research.
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Nurses play vital role in care of terminally ill patients
Medical Xpress
A University of Queensland study has found nurses play a crucial role in decisions surrounding treatment of terminally ill patients. UQ School of Social Science Associate Professor Alex Broom said dying patients who were told further treatment would be futile often turned to nurses for emotional support. "The transition to end-of-life care has traditionally been the doctor's decision," Dr. Broom said.
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Prescription narcotics are potent painkillers, but they can be deadly
The Washington Post
America is in pain — and being killed by its painkillers. It starts with drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin — prescription narcotics that can make days bearable if you are recovering from surgery or suffering from cancer. But they can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects.
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How health law's Medicaid enrollees strain the system
The Wall Street Journal
New Mexico’s decision to expand Medicaid has been a lifesaver for Kevin Gibson but a conundrum for his nurse practitioner. The 46-year-old Mr. Gibson this year got coverage under the plan, went for a checkup and learned he had prostate cancer. Before 2014, Medicaid rules wouldn’t have considered him needy enough for eligibility. But the expansion, tied to the federal health overhaul, made him eligible, and last month Medicaid paid for robotic surgery to treat his cancer.
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Chest pain and anxiety in an adolescent: An unusual etiology
Pediatric Emergency Care
Chest pain in children is commonly caused by benign etiologies but may be caused by conditions that carry significant morbidity if not treated. Emergency medicine physicians must identify the patients that require further evaluation and treatment. We describe a case of a 13-year-old boy with 10 months of progressive chest pain that had been attributed to anxiety and was ultimately diagnosed as an esophageal duplication cyst requiring surgical repair.
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FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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