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CALL FOR FCEP COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Participation on an FCEP Committee is an essential part of our program activity. Committees help us with important initiatives such as setting our legislative and regulatory priorities. They also help us to identify clinical issues affecting patients and our members.

I encourage you to consider serving on an FCEP Committee. It is a great way to learn about how others are dealing with hospital ED issues and to help FCEP remain strong in so many areas.

Committees typically meet quarterly, in conjunction with FCEP Board meetings:

DATES AND LOCATIONS:
Feb. 18, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
May 20, 2015 — FCEP Offices, Orlando
Aug. 6, 2015 — Symposium by the Sea, Amelia Island

Please use these links to connect to the Committee Interest Form and view the Committee Objectives.

Sincerely,

Ashley Booth-Norse, M.D. FACEP
President

Note to our members currently participating on committees: We ask that you please also submit a committee interest form to renew your committee membership.

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REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!


CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

EM Days 2015 Hotel Information
Hotel Duval, Tallahassee, Florida
Group rate: $215/night
Hotel Reservation Deadline: Feb. 10, 2015
Reservation Link: Book your group rate: EM Days 2015 >>

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — AROUND FLORIDA


CDC data track hospital-acquired infections in Florida, nation
Miami Herald
Seven Miami-Dade hospitals fell below national standards for combating infections acquired by patients in hospitals, and patients at one hospital — North Shore Medical Center in Miami — were more likely to develop infections than patients at any other hospital in South Florida, according to data collected by the federal government as part of a national effort to reduce such infections.
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Florida selling off shuttered mental hospital
The Associated Press via WBFS-TV
Florida has sold a closed hospital along with nearly 500 acres to a company which plans to replace it with a driver training center and a hotel. Florida is selling off a closed hospital and nearly 500 acres to a company that is promising to build a driver training center and hotel. Gov. Rick Scott and members of the Florida Cabinet voted to sell the former G. Pierce Wood Memorial Hospital to Power Auto Corporation for $2.5 million.
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Hospitals pitching for hospice deals
Health News Florida
More than a dozen groups are vying to win new hospice program contracts in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties, where state officials say they are lacking in end-of-life services, the Tampa Bay Times reports. BayCare Health System, Tampa General Hospital, Florida Hospital Tampa, Gulfside Hospice in Pasco County, and Hospice of Citrus County are among the groups that have submitted letters of intent for consideration, according to the Times.
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Legislative delegation meetings
FCEP encourages members to participate in their local legislative delegation meetings. These sessions provide a great opportunity for FCEP members to learn about their individual legislator’s priorities as well as to contribute to the discussion. FCEP would be happy to provide talking points on our 2015 legislative priorities.

Click here to see the 2014-2015 Legislative Delegation Meeting Schedule.

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5th Annual National Hospital Disaster Planning, Preparations and Response Symposium: An All-Hazards Approach
Friday, Feb. 13, 2015
Miami, Florida
This symposium is jointly sponsored by Jackson Health System and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Click here to learn more.

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EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE NEWS — NATIONAL


Does flu vaccine reduce kids' ED visits?
MedPage Today
The CDC recently announced it expects a more severe flu season this year, but a study in the January issue of Pediatrics was unable to find a correlation between influenza vaccination rates for children under 5 years old and a decline in children hospitalized for influenza-related illness. Significant increases in emergency department (ED) visits and decreases in hospitalizations over time were not clearly related to vaccination trends, researchers wrote.
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Ebola and the year of horrors and heroes
By Joan Spitrey
This week, Time magazine announced its Person of the Year: the Ebola fighters. The runners-up included notable people such as Vladimir Putin and the Ferguson protestors. All of those considered where notable newsmakers this year, but nothing captivated the news — especially within healthcare — than Ebola and the brave souls fighting this enormous fight. This past year a small, microscopic virus showed the world its strength. It spotlighted our deficits in disease control and prevention. In this age of modern medicine, this virus continues to ravage West Africa with little hope insight.
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Using internet searches to forecast emergency room visits
Design & Trend
In order to provide adequate service, hospitals need to anticipate how many patients will visit at any given time. While seasonal flu viruses are somewhat predictable, on most occasions the flow of patients is less certain. In a new study, Swedish researchers were able to use Internet searches to accurately predict the approximate number of emergency room visits, reports Science Daily.
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Progesterone offers no significant benefit in traumatic brain injury clinical trial
Medical Xpress
Treatment of acute traumatic brain injury with the hormone progesterone provides no significant benefit to patients when compared with placebo, a NIH-funded phase III clinical trial has concluded. The results are scheduled for publication Dec. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, named ProTECT III, involved 49 trauma centers across the United States between July 2009 and November 2013. The study was originally planned to include 1,140 patients, but was stopped after 882 patients because safety monitors determined that additional enrollment would be futile.
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Why this health insurer wants instant alerts from the ER
Fast Company
When one of the more than 8,000 clients signed up with Brooklyn Health Home — an organization that connects consenting Medicaid patients with HIV, diabetes, serious mental illness and other conditions to medical care — goes to the emergency room, something unusual happens: A dashboard ping is instantly sent to the patient’s primary physician, letting the doctor know their patient has been hospitalized. Now an insurance company called Oscar has begun receiving the alerts as well; it’s one of the first systems in the United States that lets an insurer instantly know when a patient has been hospitalized.
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ONC data shows money is a major motivator for EHR adoption
By Scott E. Rupp
According to a data brief released recently by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, and as reported by Healthcare IT News, financial incentives and potential penalties are key motivators for physicians adopting electronic health records since 2009. The brief, based on data from the 2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, details why physicians have chosen to adopt — or not adopt — EHRs.
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'Slow medicine' concept continues to simmer
FiercePracticeManagement
The idea of spending more quiet time conversing with patients versus darting through checklists seems to be catching on. In fact, an entire movement known as "slow medicine" has gained physician devotees from various career stages, NPR reported. "The concept is bubbling up in response to industrialized, hypertechnological and often unnecessary medical care that drives up costs and leaves both doctors and patients frazzled," John Henning Schumann, M.D., a primary care doctor in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he teaches at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine, wrote in the post.
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10 top patient safety issues for 2015
Becker's Infection Control & Clinical Quality
Hospitals are charged with the dual task of keeping patients well while also keeping patients safe. The two are inextricably linked, as patient safety concerns often tie directly into patient health concerns — hand hygiene, transitions of care and medication errors are a few such concerns that come to mind. Retrospectively, 2014 provided some lessons in patient safety issues. Looking prospectively, these concerns, and many others, will flow into the next calendar year. Some of the patient safety issues are long established, and will remain in the forefront of healthcare's mind for years to come. Here, in no particular order, are 10 important patient safety issues for providers to consider in the upcoming year.
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Huge increase in emergency room visits due to atrial fibrillation
Healthcare Professionals Network
Researchers have reported a sharp increase in emergency room visits and hospitalizations triggered by atrial fibrillation (AF). The study team, which presented its findings at the Scientific Sessions of the 2014 Meeting of the American Heart Association, pulled data about emergency department usage nationally and analyzed information about patients who received a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011.
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In healthcare, managing access rights is a necessary mandate
By Dean Wiech
Access to critical data is paramount criteria for business success. Physicians and nurses need access to patients' records to insure proper delivery of care, and encumbering employees and internal stakeholders by placing too many restrictions or complicated access methodologies upon internal systems can have catastrophic consequences. However, too little control or restrictions to information in internal systems can lead to violations for healthcare organizations. It can also create a potential breach opportunity, potentially leading to costly legal actions or fines.
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Special training prepares nurses for growing senior population
New America Media
Gina Wirick, a nurse for 25 years, had just completed intensive training to become a geriatric resource nurse, or GRN. The designation is a component of an international initiative called NICHE, or Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders. Wirick is one of 11 Dupont Hospital nurses who are now GRNs, and Dupont is one of only six Indiana hospitals to date to attain a NICHE designation by implementing research-supported NICHE practices. The NICHE mission is to provide “principles and tools to stimulate a change in the culture of health-care facilities to achieve patient-centered care for older adults.”
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Researchers discover gene that reduces the risk of stroke
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Strokes — sudden disabling attacks caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain — remain one of the biggest causes of death in the western world. Strokes kill almost 130,000 Americans each year — that's 1 out of every 19 deaths. Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke, and about 610,000 of these are first or new strokes.
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Urgent care or ER? New poll says some patients aren't choosing properly
Forbes
With the holidays just weeks away–with increases in falls from ladders, decorating injuries, and food-borne illnesses–emergency physicians have raised concern that people may not be clear about when to seek medical care in emergency departments (ED). Seventy-one percent of emergency physicians responding to a recent poll said they treat patients every day who end up in the ED after first going to an urgent care center which was not safely or medically able to care for them.
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'Unprecedented' strides in hospital patient safety
CNBC
An "unprecedented decline" in the harm suffered by patients during hospital treatment has lead to about 50,000 fewer fatalities and about $12 billion in savings since 2010, the government announced. The steep decrease in so-called "hospital-acquired conditions" — such as infections, adverse drug effects and bedsores — was partly due to Obamacare provisions, officials suggested.
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Diagnosing appendicitis: Evidence-based review of the diagnostic approach in 2014
The Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
While CT is the most accurate mode of imaging in suspected appendicitis, the accompanying radiation is a concern. Ultrasound may help in the diagnosis while decreasing the need for CT in certain circumstances. The Alvarado Score has good diagnostic utility at specific cutoff points. Laboratory markers have very limited diagnostic utility on their own but show promise when used in combination. Further studies are warranted for laboratory markers in combination and to validate potential novel markers.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Push for bill to advance telemedicine in Florida grows (FierceHealthcare)
CDC health advisory regarding the potential for circulation of drifted influenza A (H3N2) viruses (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Are freestanding ERs about access or profit? (FierceHealthcare)
Out of the frying pan, into the fire: A case of heat shock and its fatal complications (Pediatric Emergency Care)
ED antipsych meds: To inhale or not to inhale? (MedPage Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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