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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit    December 31, 2014
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As 2014 comes to a close, FCEP would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of EMnews a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 7, 2015.


1. 5 good things the Affordable Care Act imposed on healthcare
By Mike Wokasch
From Jan. 1: The U.S. healthcare market is well entrenched with operational complexity, an inefficient cost structure and serious quality issues. The diversity of treatment, along with huge, inexplicable variability in costs and how care is paid for make the Affordable Care Act even more challenging to implement. Whether or not you are a fan of "Obamacare," this government-driven initiative has already facilitated five major changes to healthcare.
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2. Why are healthcare workers getting infected with Ebola? We were not prepared
By Joan Spitrey
From Oct. 22: With the current infections of two direct caregivers, questions have surfaced regarding the preparedness of our hospitals and healthcare staff in the United States. As of this article, there have been no reports of the mode of transmission and/or contamination of the two healthcare workers. When Pham was diagnosed, the CDC was quick to blame the nurse for not following protocols. That was followed by the statement that the protocols were being evaluated. This raised the question that if the protocol was sufficient and the nurse was "to blame for her infection," why the sudden need to change the protocols?
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3. New app helping med students diagnose quickly in ER
By Stephanie McKenzie
From Oct. 15: There is a new app that is making emergency medicine a lot easier for residents and interns on the floor. The Basics of Emergency Medicine app by the Emergency Medicine Residents' Association is currently only available on iPhones, but it is already proving to be an invaluable tool to emergency medicine interns and residents across the country. The Basics of EM app is meant to give residents and interns access to a quick, easy clinical guide to dealing with up to 20 of the most common complaints seen in the ER. Young medical students are already finding it to be their "go-to" tool for nearly everything they do at work.
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4. Apps that find the least busy ER are on the wrong track
By Alan Kelsky
From Aug. 27: Emergency departments would do well to tell their potential patient population that smartphone apps featuring which neighborhood ER is the least busy are generally a waste of money. For patients with the sniffles, this might be useful information — although it is a waste of money and the ER's time for such a minor ailment. Go to an urgent care center. Public service announcements that all ERs sponsor should carry this message.
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5. Medical school education challenges
By Rosemary Sparacio
From Jan. 8: It is no secret that the cost of medical school education has skyrocketed, and enrolling in a medical school in the U.S. is difficult. Along with that, or perhaps as a reaction to that, students turn to schools out of the country and look for other ways to pay for this education. In August, the U.S. government proposed tying students' financial aid to its ratings of colleges using graduation rates, postgraduation employment and income, and affordability as parameters for the ratings. This has proven disastrous for medical schools in the past.
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6. Prevention is key: Workplace violence in the hospital
By Keith Carlson
From Nov. 12: With the recent news of several nurses in a Minnesota hospital being injured by a patient wielding a metal bar, the issue of healthcare workers facing violence in the workplace is again receiving media scrutiny. Those employed in emergency departments understand they are particularly subject to the emotional volatility of patients who may face long waits in particularly busy facilities. However, the recent events in Minnesota demonstrate that a normal medical-surgical unit is not immune from such violence.
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7. Different routes of central venous catheterization and their relative risks
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
From Oct. 29: Central venous catheterization or central line placement is a technique where a tube is inserted beneath the patient's skin in order to create a simple, pain-free way of providing medications and nutrients to the patient. Central venous access catheters have been widely used in hospital settings, and more than 3.4 million of them are placed for patients per year. Some of the benefits of this technique as compared to peripheral access include: greater longevity without infection, avoidance of phlebitis, line security and a potential route for nutritional support as well as fluid administration.
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8. The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022
By Dorothy L. Tengler
From Oct. 1: On Monday, Oct. 6, 2009, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 800 points, closing below 10,000 for the first time since 2004. America was in recession. Since then, the nation's labor market has at least partially recovered. So far in 2014, the United States has added nearly 1.6 million jobs. And through 2022, employment is expected to grow by more than 15 million jobs, or by 11 percent.
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9. Advances in point-of-care ultrasound in emergency medicine
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
From July 23: Since the introduction of the bedside ultrasound to emergency medicine more than 20 years ago, many new applications have evolved for it. Meanwhile, the scope of bedside ultrasound continues to grow tremendously. As a result of continuous progress in this field, point-of-care ultrasound scanning is now a focused ultrasound scan that is mainly performed by nonimaging clinicians in the physical examination of the patients. Recent studies have investigated the possibility of performing a wide array of diagnostic, procedural and therapeutic applications for bedside ultrasound.
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10. Why telemedicine is the future of healthcare
By Jessica Taylor
From May 28: Telemedicine is the hottest trend in the healthcare industry, and it is becoming more and more important to healthcare providers and patients around the world. The trend is already backed by many hospitals and major health insurers, and the U.S. government recently endorsed telemedicine through Medicare and Medicaid.
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FCEP EMnews

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169  
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