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Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit    May 28, 2014


 




FSP at the Florida Legislature — March 2014

Joining our Florida Society of Pathologists Legislative Consultant, Amy Young from Ballard Partners is Nicole Balmer, M.D., FSP Executive Committee member and serving as Doctor of the Day during the Legislative Session in Tallahassee. Thanks Amy for your hard work this 2014 legislative cycle and thanks Nicole for your presence during the Session!




FSP 2014 Summer Anatomic Pathology Conference — July 12-13
FSP


     Featuring:




Geza Acs, MD, PhD
Ruffolo, Hooper & Associates,
MD, PA Tampa, FL

Teri A. Longacre, MD

Stanford University Medical Center
Anatomic Pathology Department,
Stanford, CA

Bruce R. Smoller, MD

University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences, Department of
Pathology, Little Rock, AR















Registration is now open at www.flpath.org for the 2014 Florida Society of Pathologists Summer Anatomic Pathology Conference. The summer conference is always an excellent combination of education, CMEs and family beach fun! Don't be left out this year. We have an amazing faculty as well as unique networking opportunities. Our vendors will be present showcasing the latest in products and services. Please be sure to go to www.flpath.org and register. The meeting will be held at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida. Hotel reservations can be made online by visiting https://resweb.passkey.com/go/FSP14. The FSP discounted group rate is $205 single/double.

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How DNA is 'edited' to correct genetic diseases
Science Daily
A major step forward in our understanding of how enzymes "edit" genes has been made by an international team of researchers, paving the way for correcting genetic diseases in patients. Researchers have observed the process by which a class of enzymes called CRISPR — pronounced "crisper" — bind and alter the structure of DNA. The results provide a vital piece of the puzzle if these genome editing tools are ultimately going to be used to correct genetic diseases in humans.
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Study finds massive cost savings in high-tech pathogen identification method
Infection Control Today
Researchers at UNC Health Care have found that using a new method for identifying bacteria and fungi in patient specimens led to a 92 percent cost reduction in the reagents needed to run clinical microbiology tests. During the year-long study, the new technology — called MALDI-TOF MS — was also found to take much less time. In most cases, lab technologists identified a pathogen in about an hour; test results from conventional molecular methods take at least a day and often longer.
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Blood test may spot pancreatic cancer earlier
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
Researchers report that a new blood test could help doctors find pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage, potentially improving a patient's chances of survival. A set of four "markers" — or signs — in the blood identified cases of pancreatic cancer nine out of 10 times, sorting malignancies from other diseases like chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cysts.
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Physician email notification system improves patient care
HealthData Management
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Partners Healthcare in Boston have discovered that notifying a patient's physicians of the results of tests pending at discharge can markedly improve physician awareness of patient status and improve care.
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How exactly does cancer spread? Researchers learn to trigger metastasis
Medical Daily
Cancer cells that stay in one place can often be targeted and removed. Most of the 580,000 cancer deaths in the United States happen because the cancer has spread to other parts of the body in a deadly process called metastasis. Now researchers in New York City have come closer to understanding what causes cancer migration. By using new observation techniques and by tweaking genetic commands, they essentially turned on and off a key protein in metastasis called Rac1.
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Yale Cancer Center studies find lifestyle changes improve biomarkers for breast cancer recurrence and mortality
Science Codex
A pair of Yale Cancer Center interventional studies involving breast cancer survivors found that lifestyle changes in the form of healthy eating and regular exercise can decrease biomarkers related to breast cancer recurrence and mortality.
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Oncology advances leading to better diagnosis, treatment
Rosemary Sparacio
Medical oncologists and their support staff play a vital role in the overall well-being of patients. This role includes a wide array of services from medical research to improving patient care. Because cancer is such a complex disease, the medical oncology team must include surgeons, radiation oncologists and holistic physicians to provide the best possible overall care to the cancer patient. New methods to aid cancer diagnosis and treatment are being developed at a rapid pace. Here is a look at some of the latest research in oncology.
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The real problem with medical education isn't the residency matching system
Forbes
Medical education has evolved a great deal over the past two centuries. The first major reform came in 1910 with the release of the Flexner Report, an extensive document written by Abraham Flexner concerning his recommendations for a number of reforms to the existing proprietary school model for medical education. The result of this report was a dramatic shift from an education based purely on didactic teaching and route memorization to the current four-year model. Over the past few decades, the model for medical education has been further changed by two major trends.
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