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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

'Jumping genes' linked to schizophrenia
LiveScience
Some so-called jumping genes that copy and paste themselves throughout the genome may be linked to schizophrenia, new research suggests. The new study, published in the journal Neuron, suggests these jumping genes may alter how neurons (or nerve cells in the brain) form during development, thereby increasing the risk of schizophrenia, study co-author Dr. Tadafumi Kato, a neurobiologist at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, wrote in an email.
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Turning off 'aging genes'
ScienceDaily
Restricting calorie consumption is one of the few proven ways to combat aging. Though the underlying mechanism is unknown, calorie restriction has been shown to prolong lifespan in yeast, worms, flies, monkeys and, in some studies, humans. Now Keren Yizhak, a doctoral student in Prof. Eytan Ruppin's laboratory at Tel Aviv University's Blavatnik School of Computer Science, and her colleagues have developed a computer algorithm that predicts which genes can be "turned off" to create the same anti-aging effect as calorie restriction.
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Want to get published?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

Get CEUs and Safety Training for your Nurses and Case Managers! Group rates available! CareerSmart offers online CEUs and safety training applicable for Nurses, Case Managers and other healthcare professionals. They are designed to help staff prevent work-related injuries and maintain compliance with mandated continuing education requirements.
 


Humans may have fewer genes than worms
Popular Science
Once upon a time in the 1960s, scientists thought the human genome might contain as many as 2 million genes, units of DNA that code for proteins. But ever since then, the estimated number has been steadily shrinking. A new study suggests that the human genome could contain as few as 19,000 protein-coding genes, fewer than nematode worms.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine takes another step forward
OncLive
Andrew L. Pecora writes: Like you, I get up every day and look at the stack of journals I know I need to read but cannot imagine when I will find the time. That is, until a new piece of information relevant to clinical care surfaces through one of the many channels to which practicing oncologists are linked. The good old days of waiting to receive your ASH and ASCO abstract book to keep current would appear to be over because of the rapid evolution of clinically meaningful genomic information. So-called "personalized medicine" that needs to account for iterative refining of diagnostic/prognostic information has emerged as a driving force in oncology care decision making.
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DNA sequencer raises doctors' hopes for personalized medicine
Los Angeles Times
Among the many stents, surgical clamps, pumps and other medical devices that have recently come before the Food and Drug Administration for clearance, none has excited the widespread hopes of physicians and researchers like a machine called the Illumina MiSeqDx. This compact DNA sequencer has the potential to change the way doctors care for patients by making personalized medicine a reality, experts say.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Scientists discover new way of overcoming human stem cell rejection
Fox News
Human embryonic stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of cell types, making them a valuable source of transplantable tissue for the treatment of numerous diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and diabetes. But there's one major issue: Embryonic stem cells are often rejected by the human immune system.
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Gene patent case fuels US court test of stem cell right
Bloomberg
As scientists get closer to using embryonic stem cells in new treatments for blindness, spinal cord injuries and heart disease, a U.S. legal debate could determine who profits from that research. Consumer Watchdog, a nonprofit advocacy group, wants an appeals court to invalidate a University of Wisconsin-Madison's patent for stem cells derived from human embryos, saying it's too similar to earlier research.
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J&J gambles $12.5M in rare big pharma bet on a stem cell therapy
FierceBiotech
A little biotech named Capricor Therapeutics is set to begin a Phase II study of its new stem cell therapy with about $20 million in support from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. And this morning Johnson & Johnson is stepping up with a $12.5 million upfront to buy itself an option and a front-row seat on the program — marking a rare big pharma gamble on a field that is trying hard to mount a comeback.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Newest-generation Bluetooth medical devices can disrupt healthcare
SearchHealthIT
At its last Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple released several new enhancements to its iOS mobile device operating system. The new release included new feature called iBeacon, an indoor positioning system that will have significant uses in many industries, such as retail and healthcare. iBeacon runs on low-powered, low-cost transmitters that alert iOS 7 devices to their presence. These devices communicate using Bluetooth 4.0, also known as Bluetooth Low Energy.
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8 tech predictions for medical practices in 2014
Diagnostic Imaging
Several trusty tech-savvy physicians and health information technology experts tell us what's to come in 2014. So now, brace yourselves for the technology forecast.
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Technology, economy reshape dental, medical, legal offices
The Washington Post
Though the term "underwater" may have a negative connotation in today's economy, there's no place Ashburn-based dentist Haress Rahim would rather be. Rahim, who has a penchant for scuba diving and the color blue, chose an oceanic theme when he opened a practice in 2010. The theme extends from the decor to the design of his logo, website and marketing material — even the name of the practice: Bloo Dental.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
'Jumping genes' linked to schizophrenia
LiveScience
Some so-called jumping genes that copy and paste themselves throughout the genome may be linked to schizophrenia, new research suggests.

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5 good things the Affordable Care Act imposed on healthcare
By Mike Wokasch
The U.S. healthcare market is well entrenched with operational complexity, an inefficient cost structure and serious quality issues.

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Food for thought: How are you perceived professionally?
By Karen Childress
How you are perceived as a physician makes a difference. Fair or not, we’re all judged based on how we present ourselves. Being perceived professionally goes way beyond the wardrobe we choose, however.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Food for thought: Exercise your optimism muscle
By Karen Childress
If you routinely hear phrases like "Why are you so negative?" coming from people who know you well — your spouse, practice partner, office manager or even your children — it may be time to work on building up your optimism muscle. Deep-seated optimism goes beyond simply the ability to maintain a sunny, hopeful outlook on life. You can learn to be more optimistic and doing so, according to numerous studies, can result in improved health, better relationships with others and even greater longevity.
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Healthcare? There's an app for that
Bloomberg
Chrysalis Ventures and David Jones discuss technology and healthcare on Bloomberg Television's "In The Loop."
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Sanofi MS drug added with genzyme fails to win FDA approval
Bloomberg Businessweek
Sanofi failed to win U.S. regulatory approval for its multiple sclerosis drug Lemtrada, denting the company's ambitions of capturing a larger share of the $20 billion market for the disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Sanofi's Genzyme unit didn't submit evidence from "adequate and well-controlled studies" showing that the benefits of Lemtrada outweigh its side effects, the Paris-based company said in a statement.
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FDA warns dietary supplements do not cure concussions
Medical Daily
Concussions have become a hot-button issue raising fear over its possible detrimental health outcomes. Profiting on public concern, dietary supplement firms have marketed a series of products that claim to prevent, treat or cure concussions and other traumatic brain injuries, despite the lack of scientific evidence.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A closer look at keratoconus (By Dorothy L. Tengler)
Amazing new technological advances in healthcare (By Rosemary Sparacio)
6 technology trends that will change your family's health forever (Fox News)
The 6 biggest innovations in healthcare technology in 2013 (MedCity News)
Promising stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury and stroke (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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