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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Sleep during the day may throw genes into disarray
HealthDay News via WebMD
Sleeping during the day — a necessity for jet-lagged travelers and those who work overnight shifts — disrupts the rhythms of about one-third of your genes, a new study suggests. What's more, shifted sleep appears to disrupt gene activity even more than not getting enough sleep, according to the research.
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Searching genes to avoid medical side effects
The Wall Street Journal
Scientists searching for a way to avoid prescribing medications to patients that may cause dangerous physical or behavioral responses are turning increasingly to those patients' DNA. The concept of personalized medicine, tailoring treatment to patients based on their genetic makeup or other individual characteristics, is more often associated with determining which patients may respond best to which drug.
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With genetic testing, patients can see the future
Star Tribune
Denis Keegan was out of answers. The 30-year-old was suffering from kidney disease, but his doctors were struggling to pinpoint the cause. That's when Keegan turned to genetic testing. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester extracted his DNA from a blood sample and examined his genome.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

Get CEUs and Safety Training for your Nurses and Case Managers! Group rates available! CareerSmart offers online CEUs and safety training applicable for Nurses, Case Managers and other healthcare professionals. They are designed to help staff prevent work-related injuries and maintain compliance with mandated continuing education requirements.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine in colorectal cancer
OncLive
Personalized medicine in colorectal cancer has lagged behind the breakthroughs experienced in other disease types, such as criztonib and erlotinib in lung cancer, suggest moderator John L. Marshall, M.D. As the field continues to evolve, next-generation sequencing will likely play a larger role to identify patients for clinical trials, Fadi Braiteh, M.D., CPI, believes.
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Device tests blood to watch drugs in real-time
Futurity
A new device, which can monitor the levels of specific drugs as they flow through the bloodstream, may soon take the guesswork out of drug dosing and allow physicians to tailor prescriptions to their patients' specific biology. Doctors and pharmaceutical companies can generally determine reasonable drug doses for most patients through batteries of tests and trials.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Estrogen promotes blood-forming stem cell function
Medical Xpress
Scientists have known for years that stem cells in male and female sexual organs are regulated differently by their respective hormones. In a surprising discovery, researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern and Baylor College of Medicine have found that stem cells in the blood-forming system — which is similar in both sexes — also are regulated differently by hormones, with estrogen proving to be an especially prolific promoter of stem cell self-renewal.
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Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal
Reuters
Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. said results from its early/mid-stage clinical trial indicated its placenta-derived stem cells for the treatment of muscle injury were safe and provided evidence the cells might be effective in treating orthopedic injuries. "Patients treated with PLX-PAD had a greater improved change of maximal voluntary muscle contraction force than the placebo group," Israel-based Pluristem said in a statement.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Holographic diagnostics
Phys.Org
"Smart" holograms, which are currently being tested to monitor diabetes, and could be used to monitor a wide range of medical and environmental conditions in future, have been developed by researchers. Responsive holograms that change color in the presence of certain compounds are being developed into portable medical tests and devices, which could be used to monitor conditions such as diabetes, cardiac function, infections, electrolyte or hormone imbalance easily and inexpensively.
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Google's Smart Contacts: Not the only groundbreaking medical tech
PC Magazine
Google has merged its "don't be evil" motto with the medical profession's "do no harm" dictum by creating glucose-monitoring contact lenses that are already in clinical trials. While Microsoft has also been tinkering with the concept, a functional lens would be a breakthrough in technology and medicine, two fields that have closer and closer ties.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Sleep during the day may throw genes into disarray
HealthDay News via WebMD
Sleeping during the day — a necessity for jet-lagged travelers and those who work overnight shifts — disrupts the rhythms of about one-third of your genes, a new study suggests.

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Express yourself: Novel approach to study how genetic differences affect gene expression
ScienceDaily
Each individual carries a unique version of the human genome. Genetic differences can influence traits such as height, weight and vulnerability to disease, but precisely what these genetic variants are and how they exercise their impact is mostly unknown.

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23andMe genetic test reveals disturbing artificial insemination switch
LiveScience via Fox News
A young women conceived with help from a fertility clinic in Utah in the early 1990s is actually the biological daughter of the former clinic receptionist, genetic testing reveals.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


How to navigate the politics of medicine
By Karen Childress
There are plenty of doctors who willingly take on leadership roles that land them squarely in the middle of all kinds of interesting and challenging encounters within an organization. Thank goodness for them, because someone needs to be on the front line advocating for patients and members of the medical staff. Your hospital's medical staff bylaws may require a certain level of committee participation on your part. If this is the case, pick and choose so that you can contribute in areas that are a good fit with your strengths and interests.
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Co-ops the underdog in health insurance marketplace
USA Today
Consumer-run health insurance cooperatives, which were included in the Affordable Care Act to stimulate competition and lower prices, have been stymied by the insurance industry and a lack of publicity, industry and healthcare experts say. The consumer-operated and run insurance companies, called co-ops, are often funded by government loans.
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New contractor for insurance exchange website faces quite a challenge
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After its three-year contract to build the federal health insurance exchange website culminated in a launch full of glitches and bad press, CGI Federal did not receive a contract renewal. Instead, the federal government is putting its faith — and more than $45 million — in Arlington, Va.-based Accenture Federal Services to oversee the HealthCare.gov website. After the myriad problems that plagued the site at the time of its launch, experts say Accenture has its work cut out for it over the next year.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


The FDA nixes a pathbreaking drug for MS
The Wall Street Journal
Alemtuzumab is used today as an intravenous treatment for a form of leukemia. But 20 years of research centered at Cambridge University also has shown that the action of this drug—depleting immune cells that become misdirected and attack one's own body — is effective in treating multiple sclerosis.
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FDA panel recommends approval of Northera for hypotension treatment
Healio
The FDA's Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted 16-1 to recommend approval of droxidopa for the treatment of hypotension in patients with primary autonomic failure. The panel made its recommendation despite reservations from FDA staff, who expressed concerns about safety and efficacy data as well as the design of studies conducted by the sponsor, Chelsea Therapeutics, to make the case for droxidopa, which would be marketed under the name Northera if approved.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Turning off 'aging genes' (')
New stem cell study explains how breast cancer spreads (News-Medical.net)
Scientists discover genetic signature mechanism in immune system as driving force for childhood leukaemia (News-Medical.net)
DNA sequencer raises doctors' hopes for personalized medicine (MCT Wire via Grand Haven Tribune)
With genetic data, Pennsylvania medical center joins effort to forge 'personalized' approaches (NewsWorks)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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