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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

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Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

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GENOMICS

What search for 'Adam's genes' tells us about ourselves
Fox News
FoxNews.com's Jeremy Kaplan reported, that "a pair of scientific studies using the latest genetic evidence are seeking to identify the very first man to walk the Earth, the so-called 'Adam.'" The search for "Adam's genes" tells a compelling story — a story of more than unlocking the genetic code of the first human, but also a story of the human desire to see meaning and purpose in all that we do, whether we consider ourselves religious or not.
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Which parts of us are Neanderthal? Our genes point to skin and hair
NBC News
A double-barreled comparison of ancient Neanderthal DNA with hundreds of modern-day genomes suggests that many of us have Neanderthal skin and hair traits — but other parts of the Neanderthal genome appear to have been bred out of us along the way. The findings, reported by two separate teams of researchers in the journals Science and Nature, follow up on previous studies showing that Neanderthals interbred with humans outside Africa.
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A height gene? Smarts gene? Don't bet on it
The Wall Street Journal
Robert Sapolsky writes: As I skimmed my emails one morning — mostly Viagra ads and news of the three lotteries that I had won during the night — one stopped me in my tracks. "Is overeating in your genes? Take an online test." I was curious — not about whether my genes prompted me to pig out, but about how the company's test was supposed to determine that.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine extends into wellness
Bloomberg BNA
The promise of personalized medicine has prompted life sciences companies and medical researchers to continue to pursue the next logical step — into wellness. Personalized medicine is usually defined as determining the right drug for the right person at the right time through genomic analysis. Some in the life sciences profession say that the effort can and should go beyond diagnostic testing.
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Doctor's new 'concierge medicine' practice allows for more personalized care
Journal and Courier
When Mike Heide of Lafayette called his doctor for medical advice last year, he expected to leave a voicemail. "But he answered the phone,” said 54-year-old Heide. It was about two weeks before Christmas. His son-in-law, Ben Forth, developed a rash while in town visiting with Heide's daughter, Krystin Forth. Heide wondered whether Ben needed to go to urgent care.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cell breakthrough may be simple, fast, cheap
CNN
We run too hard, we fall down, we're sick — all of this puts stress on the cells in our bodies. But in what's being called a breakthrough in regenerative medicine, researchers have found a way to make stem cells by purposely putting mature cells under stress. Two new studies published in the journal Nature describe a method of taking mature cells from mice and turning them into embryonic-like stem cells, which can be coaxed into becoming any other kind of cell possible.
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Extraordinary stem cell method tested in human tissue
NewScientist
Talk about speedy work. Hot on the heels of the news that simply dipping adult mouse cells in acid could turn them into cells with the potential to turn into any cell in the body, it appears that the same thing may have been done using human cells. The picture above, given to New Scientist by Charles Vacanti at Harvard Medical School, is said to be images of the first human "STAP cell" experiments.
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Ignorance led to invention of stem cell technique
The Boston Globe
Dr. Charles Vacanti is an unlikely protagonist for one of the most startling scientific discoveries in years. The genial 63-year-old anesthesiologist who left stem cell scientists shaking their heads in wonder and puzzlement, with the discovery that a simple acid bath could be used to generate powerful stem cells, doesn't even have a Ph.D.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Startups see healthy future for Google Glass in medicine
San Francisco Chronicle
Among the tech elite, Google Glass is a sleek symbol of minimalist, futuristic cool. But several startups see deeper potential in Glass: the ability to heal wounds and save lives. Pristine in Austin, Texas makes the app EyeSight, which enables physicians and nurses to transmit live video and audio of wound patients from Glass to authorized computers, smartphones and tablets.
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Apple executives met with FDA to discuss mobile medical applications
The New York Times
Apple has signaled strong interest in health-monitoring technology, which could wind up in a widely anticipated smartwatch. A group of senior Apple executives met with directors at the United States Food and Drug Administration in December to discuss mobile medical applications, according to the FDA's public calendars that list participants of meetings.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
What search for 'Adam's genes' tells us about ourselves
Fox News
FoxNews.com's Jeremy Kaplan reported, that "a pair of scientific studies using the latest genetic evidence are seeking to identify the very first man to walk the Earth, the so-called 'Adam.'"

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DNA study: Light skin genes evolved more recently than previously thought
The Huffington Post
An ancient European hunter-gatherer man had dark skin and blue eyes, a new genetic analysis has revealed. The analysis of the man, who lived in modern-day Spain only about 7,000 years ago, shows light-skin genes in Europeans evolved much more recently than previously thought.

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Study: Jet lag, late nights and naps disrupt gene function
Forbes
Business travelers, shift workers, college students and overworked tech workers, beware. Unusual sleep patterns, particularly sleeping during the day and staying up late at night, wreak havoc with the activity of your genes, new research shows.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Attracting young adults to insurance exchanges proves difficult
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After a slow and rocky start, the state and federal health insurance exchanges seem to finally be taking off. By the end of December, enrollment surpassed the 3 million mark for state and federal marketplaces combined. But young adults — who many claim are key to the success of the Affordable Care Act — haven't been as eager as their older counterparts to enroll. Adults between the ages of 18 and 34 make up 40 percent of the potential market for exchange plans. But a recent report by the Department of Health and Human Services shows they only accounted for a quarter of total enrollees.
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10 places where health insurance costs the most
NPR
If you are buying health coverage in the Colorado ski resort towns, the Connecticut suburbs of New York City or a bunch of otherwise low-cost rural regions of Georgia, Mississippi and Nevada, you have the misfortune of living in the most expensive insurance marketplaces under the new health law. The 10 most expensive regions also include all of Alaska and Vermont and large parts of Wisconsin and Wyoming.
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Study: EHR beliefs tied to gender, personality
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
It's an established fact that for technology implementation to be successful, there needs to be some flexibility in order to meet the individual needs of those learning the new systems. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a survey of 126 third-year medical schools to determine which personal characteristics related to their perceptions of electronic health record systems. Among their findings was that men were more likely than women to report that EHRs were easy to use. But some officials caution that it would be bad to place people in groups based on gender, culture or personality.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Hepatitis C treatment shifts as new drugs emerge
USA Today
John Billeris has tried and failed four grueling rounds of treatment for his chronic hepatitis C infection over the past 15 years. He is not convinced that his fifth try — with what he jokingly calls "magic medicine" — will be the charm. But he says the three-drug regimen he started on Christmas is definitely easier to take.
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FDA will review safety of testosterone therapy
HealthDay News via U.S News & World Report
Spurred by a recent report that popular testosterone treatments might raise men's heart risk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it now plans a review of the therapies' safety. "FDA is investigating the risk of stroke, heart attack and death in men taking FDA-approved testosterone products," the agency said in a statement released.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    De novo gene mutations linked to schizophrenia (Medscape)
Sony forms genome analysis company in move towards personalized medicine (The Verge)
Apple hires medical tech experts to work on iWatch (ITProPortal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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