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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

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Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

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GENOMICS

Ethics questions arise as genetic testing of embryos increases
The New York Times
Her first thought after she heard the news, after she screamed and made her mother and boyfriend leave the room, was that she would never have children. Amanda Baxley's doctor had just told her, over a speakerphone in her psychiatrist's office, that she had the gene for Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease, or GSS, which would inevitably lead to her slow and terrible death.
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Ancient human secrets revealed by new DNA analysis
Healthline
Two new studies in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are shaking up commonly held views about where we come from, while also pointing us down the path to future medical research. The first, by scientists in the U.S. and Germany, charts a new model for the early spread of western Eurasian people into southern Africa. This means that genetic mixing occurred long before the period of European colonialism.
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Scientists spot 7 new regions of DNA tied to Type 2 diabetes
HealthDay News
The discovery of seven new regions of DNA linked to Type 2 diabetes could lead to new ways of thinking about diabetes and new treatments for the disease, researchers suggest. The findings were among the results of the largest study to date on the genetics of diabetes, which compiled genetic information on people from four different ethnic groups, the study authors said.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

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Engineering the human genome 1 letter at a time
RedOrbit
Sometimes biology is cruel. Sometimes simply a one-letter change in the human genetic code is the difference between health and a deadly disease. But even though doctors and scientists have long studied disorders caused by these tiny changes, replicating them to study in human stem cells has proven challenging.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Expanded DNA testing might allow personalized breast cancer treatment
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Testing the entire genetic makeup — or all the DNA — of tumor cells from women with advanced breast cancer may help identify patients who could be helped by specific treatments, according to new research. The approach is considered the wave of the future by both the French researchers who conducted the study and U.S. experts.
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'Viewpoint' addresses IOM report on genome-based therapeutics and companion diagnostics
Medical Xpress
The promise of personalized medicine, says University of Vermont molecular pathologist Debra Leonard, M.D., Ph.D., is the ability to tailor therapy based on markers in the patient's genome and, in the case of cancer, in the cancer's genome. Making this determination depends on not one, but several genetic tests, but the system guiding the development of those tests is complex, and plagued with challenges.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells cultivated without using human or animal cells
Medical News Today
Previously, stem cells have been cultivated using animal proteins or by growing them from other human cells. Both methods come with associated problems. But, according to a study published in the journal Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers have now identified a new method for cultivating stem cells.
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Scientists debate, try stem cell acid test
The Boston Globe
Already, scientists in laboratories across the world have begun dipping mature cells in acid, hoping to see whether this simple intervention really can trigger a transformation into stem cells, as reported by a team of Boston and Japanese researchers in January. At the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, a number of scientists have embarked on the experiment, which they're informally calling "stem cell ceviche," comparing it to the Latin American method of cooking seafood in lime and lemon juice.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Majority of physicians use mobile devices, but not mobile EHRs
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Among physicians, mobile devices have become as ubiquitous as lab coats and stethoscopes. Mobile connectivity is becoming increasingly important as physicians find new ways to incorporate the use of mobile devices into their daily lives. One area of medicine that mobile technology hasn't completely infiltrated, however, is electronic health record systems. A recent survey found 78 percent of physicians use smartphones in their professional lives and 51 percent use tablets. But only 8 percent access their EHRs with a smartphone and 17 percent access them with a tablet.
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FDA approves pill-sized camera to let doctors see your insides
Mashable via San Jose Mercury News
A bite-sized camera has been approved for use by the FDA as an alternative for patients who are unable to have a complete colonoscopy. The pill-shaped capsule has a camera on both ends. It navigates through your intestines over an eight-hour period, taking high-speed images that are sent to a device worn by a patient that are later examined by a doctor.
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New wireless transceiver technology for medical devices
Phys.org
Fujitsu Laboratories and imec Holst Centre announced that they have developed a wireless transceiver circuit for use in body area networks for medical applications that adheres to the 400 MHz-band international standard. While the subject of high expectations for medical applications, wireless monitoring of brainwaves or other vital signs has in the past required over a dozen milliwatts of electric power.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Ethics questions arise as genetic testing of embryos increases
The New York Times
Her first thought after she heard the news, after she screamed and made her mother and boyfriend leave the room, was that she would never have children.

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Which parts of us are Neanderthal? Our genes point to skin and hair
NBC News
A double-barreled comparison of ancient Neanderthal DNA with hundreds of modern-day genomes suggests that many of us have Neanderthal skin and hair traits — but other parts of the Neanderthal genome appear to have been bred out of us along the way.

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What search for 'Adam's genes' tells us about ourselves
Fox News
FoxNews.com's Jeremy Kaplan reported, that "a pair of scientific studies using the latest genetic evidence are seeking to identify the very first man to walk the Earth, the so-called 'Adam.'"

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Searching for the best physician in the world
By Clint Hubler
Often as I review physician CVs, I see accomplishments and rankings such as "top doctor in the U.S." or "best doctor in state." In conversations I also hear about prestigious awards and recognition. These types of things fall under the general category of "what people say about themselves." In my work as a physician representative, I'm always asking myself, "What makes a physician great?" I listen to what people say about themselves, but that's not my primary focus. I'm looking for something else. How do I find out if a physician is great?
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Millions trapped in health law coverage gap
The Wall Street Journal
Ernest Maiden was dumbfounded to learn that he falls through the cracks of the healthcare law because in a typical week he earns about $200 from the Happiness and Hair Beauty and Barber Salon. Like millions of other Americans caught in a mismatch of state and federal rules, the 57-year-old hair stylist doesn't make enough money to qualify for federal subsidies to buy health insurance.
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Hill plan would reward Medicare doctors for quality
Kaiser Health News
After negotiating for months over how to overhaul Medicare's troubled payment system for physicians, the bipartisan leadership of three Senate and House committees has reached a deal on the policy. Their next task could be even harder — finding a way to finance repeal of the "doc fix," the shorthand for the 1997 formula used to set physician payments, the sustainable growth rate.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA reconsiders heart safety of common pain pills
The Associated Press via The Boston Globe
Federal health experts are taking a second look at the heart safety of pain medications used by millions of Americans to treat arthritis and other everyday aches and pains. The Food and Drug Administration holds a two-day meeting to examine the latest research on anti-inflammatory medicines called NSAIDS, which serve as the backbone of U.S. pain treatment.
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FDA investigates the safety of testosterone drugs for 'low T'
Healthline
Drug companies market testosterone pills and creams to ease symptoms such as low libido, a decrease in life satisfaction, or "a recent deterioration in your ability to play sports." But emerging research is showing that testosterone treatments may create problems of their own, including an increased risk of heart attacks.
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FDA approves 2 separate generic drug treatments for HIV-1 infection
Healio
The FDA granted tentative approval of a generic formulation of atazanavir sulfate capsules and approved a generic fixed-dose formulation of lamivudine and zidovudine tablets, both indicated for use combined with other antiviral agents for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, according to a news release.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A height gene? Smarts gene? Don't bet on it (The Wall Street Journal)
Extraordinary stem cell method tested in human tissue (NewScientist)
Doctor's new 'concierge medicine' practice allows for more personalized care (Journal and Courier)
Ignorance led to invention of stem cell technique (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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