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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Human genes reflect impact of historical events
The Associated Press via ABC News
Tell-tale relics of Europe's colonial period, the Mongol empire and the Arab slave trade can be found in the genes of modern humans, scientists said. Researchers from Britain and Germany used almost 1,500 DNA samples from 95 different populations across the world to produce a map showing genetic links stretching back 4,000 years.
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In search of lost genes
Phys.org
It is well known that genes are passed from one generation to the next. In addition, new genes arise regularly, although the number of genes in a particular organism does not seem to increase. The paradox has been solved by recent research at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, which shows that newly created genes are frequently lost. The spontaneous appearance and disappearance of genes enables organisms to adapt rapidly to their environment and helps drive evolution.
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Scientists: Your diet may not fit your genes
Fox News
You are what you eat, and what you eat could be making you age prematurely; in fact, it may even be killing you. And it's not all about 64-ounce cups of sugary soda pop. It may just be that those skinny jeans don't fit your genes. Your diet can trigger genetic effects that cause you to age more rapidly, according to a recently completed study at the University of Southern California Davis.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


In life science innovation, tumor storage center wants to put patients in control of their treatment
MedCity News
An innovative life science startup has positioned itself squarely at the intersection of the "free the data" movement and personalized medicine. It encourages cancer patients to store their tumors when they have surgery, with the idea that they can use them to determine their best cancer treatment options. The hope is to give patients more choices and control over their treatment.
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The re-imagination of healthcare
Forbes
Today the healthcare industry is facing a tsunami of inexorable market forces that are leading to major global disruptions, transformations and collapses of traditional systems. A large part of this is emanating from the convergence of technology into biology, resulting in cross pollination of disciplines, countries, policies and regulations.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Researchers scrutinize findings on stem cells
The Boston Globe
A prestigious Japanese research institution is investigating scientific papers that last month reported the controversial discovery that stem cells could be created simply by bathing mature cells in a weak acid. Dr. Charles Vacanti, a Brigham and Women's Hospital anesthesiologist who is the senior author on one of the papers reporting the discovery and a co-author on another, said that one of his Japanese co-authors from the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology notified him of a problem in the paper for which he was a co-author.
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Acid-bath stem cell study under investigation
Nature via Scientific American
A leading Japanese research institute has opened an investigation into a groundbreaking stem cell study after concerns were raised about its credibility. The RIKEN center in Kobe announced that it is looking into alleged irregularities in the work of biologist Haruko Obokata, who works at the institution. S
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Apple technology could be coming to cars, medical devices
CBS News
Apple Inc. is looking at cars and medical devices to diversify its sources of revenue as growth from iPhones and iPads slow, according to a San Francisco Chronicle report. Apple's head of mergers and acquisitions, Adrian Perica, met with Tesla Motors Inc. founder Elon Musk at the company's headquarters last year around the same time analysts suggested that Apple acquire the Model S electric car maker, the newspaper reported.
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3 next-generation trends in medical tech you need to know
The Motley Fool
Top medical device stocks steamed through 2013 and the market rally with flying colors, but it is innovation that will power the success of this industry in the future for investors. As established tech products such as defibrillators and pacemakers see sales fall off or struggle to gain growth, new technologies have ignited a spark in up-and-coming companies.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Human genes reflect impact of historical events
The Associated Press via ABC News
Tell-tale relics of Europe's colonial period, the Mongol empire and the Arab slave trade can be found in the genes of modern humans, scientists said.

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Ethics questions arise as genetic testing of embryos increases
The New York Times
Her first thought after she heard the news, after she screamed and made her mother and boyfriend leave the room, was that she would never have children.

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Ancient human secrets revealed by new DNA analysis
Healthline
Two new studies in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are shaking up commonly held views about where we come from, while also pointing us down the path to future medical research.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


States meld Medicare and Medicaid
USA Today
They are a diverse group of low-income people who are disabled or elderly. Many have multiple chronic illnesses, or are battling depression or substance abuse. Most will need long-term care at some point in their lives. In the nearly 50 years since Medicaid and Medicare were enacted, the two healthcare programs — one for the poor and the other for the elderly and disabled — have remained separate, with different rules, duplicative benefits and conflicting financial incentives.
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1/5 of new enrollees under healthcare law fail to pay 1st premium
The New York Times
One in five people who signed up for health insurance under the new healthcare law failed to pay their premiums on time and therefore did not receive coverage in January, insurance companies and industry experts say. Paying the first month's premium is the final step in completing an enrollment. Under federal rules, people must pay the initial premium to have coverage take effect.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


More specialists question safety of testosterone therapy for older men
HealthDay News
Following the recent announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about the potential hazards of using testosterone supplements in older men, another group of experts is raising concerns about the popular treatments. In a statement, specialists in hormonal therapy at the Endocrine Society said the risks and benefits of testosterone supplements for older men with age-related declines in testosterone levels must be investigated more carefully.
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FDA: Female sex drive drug needs more research
CNN
A leading drug candidate for low sexual desire in women hasn't gotten approved for use in the United States, but the company backing it isn't giving up. Sprout Pharmaceuticals announced Tuesday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave the company "clear guidance" on "the path forward" for its drug to treat low libido in women, called flibanserin.
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FDA rejects wider use of Xarelto drug
Reuters
U.S. health regulators have again declined to approve proposed wider uses of Bayer AG and Johnson & Johnson's lucrative blood clot preventer Xarelto, the drugmakers said. The companies had sought approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the blockbuster pill for prevention of new heart attacks and strokes, and death, in patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also to prevent clogging of heart stents.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Expanded DNA testing might allow personalized breast cancer treatment (HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report)
Scientists spot 7 new regions of DNA tied to Type 2 diabetes (HealthDay News)
Searching for the best physician in the world (By Clint Hubler)
Stem cells cultivated without using human or animal cells (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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