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Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

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Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

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Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

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GENOMICS

Detailed study of living cells challenges classic gene regulation model
Phys.org
In all living organisms, genes are regulated by proteins called transcription factors. The established model states that a gene is switched off as long as a repressing transcription factor is bound to the DNA. For the first time ever, researchers at Uppsala University, Sweden, have been able to study the process in living cells, showing that it may be more complex than previously thought.
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Modern genes reveal 100 major population shifts in human history
Popular Science
Violence and love, conquest and assimilation, they're all in your DNA. Literally. As human populations have moved around the world, they've left bits of their genes to mark their passage. We've reported on this before, as scientists have used genes to trace immigrations in the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent. Now, an ambitious new project has attempted to use genetics to identify many of the major movements of humans over the last 4,000 years. No problem, right?
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Is genetic testing humans playing God?
CNN
"It's a miracle," she told me. "We can now have a baby that won't have Huntington's disease. I thought I'd never be able to have any kids — because of the disease." Her father had died from this disorder, which results from a gene mutation. She feared that she might have the mutation, too. But she was too scared to undergo testing for it. She also worried that if she had it, she might pass it on to her children.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Study highlights the importance of personalized medicine for treating cancer
News-Medical.net
If a driver is traveling to New York City, I-95 might be their route of choice. But they could also take I-78, I-87 or any number of alternate routes. Most cancers begin similarly, with many possible routes to the same disease. A new study found evidence that assessing the route to cancer on a case-by-case basis might make more sense than basing a patient's cancer treatment on commonly disrupted genes and pathways.
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Personalized medicine a cost-effective way to tailor drug therapy after stents
Health Canal
Genetic testing can help doctors choose the most effective and economical drugs to prevent blood clots in the half a million patients in the U.S. who receive coronary stents each year, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco researcher. The work, reported in the February 18, 2014 Annals of Internal Medicine, demonstrates that genetically guided personalized medicine, often perceived as pricier than traditional approaches, can both lower costs and increase the quality of healthcare.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


US issues patent for a fraudulent human embryonic stem cell method
Forbes
At first I thought the Patent Office was having a little fun. Was it an April Fools Day joke? No, it's only February — and the U.S. Patent Office never kids around. What did they do? They issued a patent to Korean scientist Woo-Suk Hwang for a method to create human embryonic stem cells by cloning. The problem is, Hwang's "invention" was one of the most famous frauds of the past decade.
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'Largest ever' trial of adult stem cells in heart attack patients begins
Medical New Today
The largest ever trial of adult stem cell therapy in heart attack patients has begun at The London Chest Hospital in the U.K. Heart disease is the world's leading cause of death. Globally, more than 17 million people died from heart disease last year. In the U.S., over 1 million people suffer a heart attack each year, and about half of them die.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


10 ways mobile technology will save your life in the future
CNN
The medical and healthcare sectors are in the midst of rapid change, and it can be difficult to see which new technologies will have a long-lasting impact. Ideally, the future of healthcare will balance innovative medical technologies with the human touch. Here, I've outlined the trends most likely to change our lives, now or in the near future.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Detailed study of living cells challenges classic gene regulation model
Phys.org
In all living organisms, genes are regulated by proteins called transcription factors.

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Human genes reflect impact of historical events
The Associated Press via ABC News
Tell-tale relics of Europe's colonial period, the Mongol empire and the Arab slave trade can be found in the genes of modern humans, scientists said.

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Scientists: Your diet may not fit your genes
Fox News
You are what you eat, and what you eat could be making you age prematurely; in fact, it may even be killing you. And it's not all about 64-ounce cups of sugary soda pop.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


How to bring the price of healthcare into the open
The Wall Street Journal
It's a simple idea, but a radical one. Let people know in advance how much healthcare will cost them — and whether they can find a better deal somewhere else. With outrage growing over incomprehensible medical bills and patients facing a higher share of the costs, momentum is building for efforts to do just that. Price transparency, as it is known, is common in most industries but rare in healthcare, where "charges," "prices," "rates" and "payments" all have different meanings and bear little relation to actual costs.
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Private exchange sees surge in healthcare enrollment
USA Today
The number of customers on the nation's largest private health insurance exchange increased by 50 percent in the final three months of 2013, a direct result of demand created by the Affordable Care Act, the company's CEO said. Gary Lauer, CEO of eHealth Insurance, said individual memberships rose 50 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 compared with the same period in 2012, from 113,600 applications in the last three months of 2012 to 169,800 in 2013.
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Choosing health coverage as deadline nears
The New York Times
If you don't have health insurance, there is still time to enroll through the public marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act. But don't delay too long: The deadline for obtaining coverage for this year is March 31. With six weeks left in the open enrollment period, the numbers of people signing up for coverage are growing.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA gives Bristol-Myers' hepatitis drug 'breakthrough' designation
FoxBusiness
Bristol-Myers Squibb's investigational treatment for hepatitis C infection was awarded "breakthrough therapy designation" by U.S. drug regulators. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only approved four breakthrough therapies since the FDA's Safety and Innovation Act was signed into law in July 2012.
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FDA considers 3-person embryo fertilization
TIME
The FDA is considering an experimental fertilization technique that makes it possible to create a baby from the DNA of three people, with the goal to bypass genetic disorders from the mother. The FDA will weigh both sides of the case for a procedure that could prevent mothers from passing along genetic diseases, but also open the door to the possibility of designer babies, experts and critics argue.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    In search of lost genes (Phys.org)
3 next-generation trends in medical tech you need to know (The Motley Fool)
Scientists: Your diet may not fit your genes (5) (')
Researchers scrutinize findings on stem cells (The Boston Globe)
States meld Medicare and Medicaid (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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