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 Genomics

BPA exposure linked to genetic changes that alter brain development
CBS News
BPA is back in the news, now that a new study has linked the controversial chemical to potentially dangerous effects on a child's developing nervous system. "Our study found that BPA may impair the development of the central nervous system, and raises the question as to whether exposure could predispose animals and humans to neurodevelopmental disorders," the study author said.
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Genes may predict response to sole sickle cell drug
Health Canal
Hydoxyurea is an almost ideal drug for many children with sickle cell anemia. It reduces the severe pain and long-term organ damage caused by sickled blood cells; it can improve lifespan; and it is cheap and fairly safe. And it's the only FDA-approved medication for sickle cell anemia. By analyzing a patient's genes, physicians may be able to predict who will respond to a sickle cell drug.
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Surgical site infections appear to have significant genetic connections
The Medical News
An estimated 300,000 U.S. patients get surgical site infections every year, and while the causes are varied, a new University of Utah study suggests that some who get an infection can blame it partly on their genes.
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 Biotech/Diagnostics/Personalized Medicine


Biotech CEOs: Personalized medicine has promise but not enough funding
MedCity News
Leaders of several Richmond-area biotechnology-related companies said that they foresee personalized medicine as a major force driving the industry's growth, but access to capital for small firms with good ideas remain a challenge.
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Concentra offers medical practice expertise, operational and peer support, and long-term stability to enable your professional and financial success. Our providers work consistent schedules that encourage healthy work-life balance, and experience the satisfaction of working in an environment designed to reduce administrative burden while allowing more time for patient care.


Geneticists question balance of media coverage on personalized medicine
Dark Daily
There is a vigorous debate unfolding about the ability of personal genome sequencing to reliably predict disease. That is not news to pathologists and clinical laboratory managers. What is a novel twist in the arguments by both sides is whether media coverage has the potential to undermine public support for genomics and personalized medicine.
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 Regenerative Medicine


'Holy grail' of stem cell research discovered
Zee News
Scientists have developed sugar-coated scaffolding to improve stem cell technology to cure some of the world's incurable diseases and conditions. Stem cells have the unique ability to turn into any type of human cell, opening up all sorts of therapeutic possibilities for diseases from Alzheimer's to diabetes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    DNA test for rare disorders becomes more routine (The New York Times)
Medicine for the rich about to get cheap enough for regular people (Wired)
Genetic signs of alcoholism in women studied for first time (HealthCanal)
Blame common colds on your chromosome 'caps?' (HealthDay News)
Almost one-third of chemotherapy used 'off-label' (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 Emerging Medical Technologies


Scientists use 3-D printing to help grow an ear
Newser via USA Today
Scientists at Cornell have put 3-D printing to an incredible medical use: They've made an ear remarkably similar to a natural one. Using 3-D images of a human ear, they printed a mold to be injected with gel containing collagen from rats' tails. Next, they added cartilage from cows' ears. "It takes half a day to design the mold, a day or so to print it, 30 minutes to inject the gel and we can remove the ear 15 minutes later," says a researcher.
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 Managed Healthcare News


Humana reveals to investors how it pays physicians
American Medical News
As part of what Humana CEO Michael McCallister described as his company's plans to push an integrated care delivery model "as far and as fast as we can take it," the insurer said it wanted to satisfy investors by showing its progress in some way.
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Group: Coordinated care could save California $110 billion
Los Angeles Times
California could cut $110 billion in healthcare spending over the next decade, saving the average household $800 a year, by quickly moving away from conventional fee-for-service medicine and embracing more coordinated care, a new report says.
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 FDA: New Treatments and Technology


FDA approves drug for painful sex in women
Reuters
Health regulators said they have approved a drug made by Japan's Shionogi & Co to treat women experiencing pain during sexual intercourse. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug, Osphena, for a type of pain known as dyspareunia, which is a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy due to menopause.
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FDA expands approval of cancer drug
The Associated Press via USA Today
The Food and Drug Administration expanded approval of a Bayer cancer pill to treat tumors of the intestinal tract that don't respond to other treatments. The drug is called Stivarga and regulators approved it to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors that cannot be surgically removed and no longer respond to other FDA-approved drugs.
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FDA halts trials of Amgen drug in children, cites death
Retuers
The Food and Drug Administration said it has stopped all pediatric clinical trials of Amgen Inc.'s Sensipar after the death of a 14-year-old patient taking part in a study of the drug. Sensipar, which is approved for adults, is used to lower dangerously high calcium levels in the blood.
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Cancer drugs proving worth earlier in testing
Reuters
It typically has taken a decade and $1 billion to bring a new treatment to market. But in the last two years a handful of cancer drugs — including Onyx Pharmaceutical's Kyprolis for multiple myeloma, Roche's Zelboraf for melanoma, and Pfizer's Xalkori — were approved in about half that time because of improved genetic screening, more definitive Phase I trials and the dire need for new, effective treatments.
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FAST FACTS
"Signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease usually begin in childhood, and are caused by the sickling of red blood cells, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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