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The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

 




 Genomics

Breast cancer genetic testing gets covered by healthcare reform
MyHealthNewsDaily
Genetic testing for breast cancer will be covered under the Affordable Care Act, potentially saving women who need the test thousands of dollars. Myriad Genetics, the company that makes the test for the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, said that the U.S. government considers these tests to be preventive services. This means that private insurance plans are required to cover the cost of the tests, including co-pays, deductibles and coinsurance, provided that the plans do not have a "grandfathered" status.
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Pricing out prescription genomic medicine
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Genomic research is widely expected to transform patient care, but progress has been slower than was first expected. For critics, delays represent broken promises and suggest that genomic research funding might be better spent elsewhere. For proponents, the pace simply underscores the complexity of the relationship between genetics and disease and argues, if anything, for more funding.
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Obesity gene tied to melanoma
Newsmax Health
For the first time, scientists have tied the gene most strongly linked to obesity and overeating to an increased risk of malignant melanoma — the most deadly form of skin cancer. Investigators with Cancer Research U.K. scientists at the University of Leeds have determined people with particular variations in a stretch of DNA within the so-called FTO gene are at greater risk of developing melanoma.
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 Biotech/Diagnostics/Personalized Medicine


New implantable sensor holds promise for advancing personalized medicine
The Medical News
Rebecca Wachs has invented a new implantable sensor with the ability to wirelessly transmit data from the site of a knee replacement, spinal fusion, or other orthopedic surgery. Simple, robust, and inexpensive to make, her sensor holds the promise of advancing personalized medicine by giving doctors an unprecedented wealth of information about how an individual patient is healing.
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IT changes doctor-patient relationship for better
InformationWeek
While today's buzzword in health IT might be population health management, Eric Topol, MD, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, believes that medicine needs to be practiced at a more personalized level.
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 Regenerative Medicine


Researchers use stem cells to regenerate muscles in diseased mice
Minnesota Public Radio
University of Minnesota researchers, using stem cell technology, have sparked muscle regeneration in laboratory mice with a fast-moving form of muscular dystrophy, a disease that severely weakens muscles. They hope their breakthrough in mice will one day lead to more effective treatments for humans who have the disease known as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    BPA exposure linked to genetic changes that alter brain development (CBS News)
Humana reveals to investors how it pays physicians (American Medical News)
Biotech CEOs: Personalized medicine has promise but not enough funding (MedCity News)
'Holy grail' of stem cell research discovered (Zee News)
FDA approves drug for painful sex in women (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 Emerging Medical Technologies


Bendable needles developed to deliver stem cells into brains
Scientific American
As the surgical team prepared its instruments, a severed human head lay on the plastic tray, its face covered by a blue cloth. It had thawed over the past 24 hours, and a pinky-sized burr hole had been cut near the top of its skull. Scalp covered with salt-and-pepper stubble wrinkled above and below a pink strip of smooth bone.
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Moving toward earlier, better diagnosis of breast cancer
Medgadget
Breast cancer is diagnosed in over 200,000 women annually in the United States, according to the CDC. The importance of detecting breast cancer early can’t be overstated: 1 out of 8 invasive breast cancers are found in women younger than 45, while about two or three invasive breast cancers are found in women age 55 or older. Atossa Genetics, based out of Seattle, is attempting to address this trend.
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 Managed Healthcare News


Mental health minimum benefits bolstered
American Medical News
Doctors navigating their way through the Affordable Care Act's final minimum coverage requirements for 2014 face a complex environment in which more people are obtaining access to mental healthcare and other services, but doing so through benefits that can vary significantly by insurer and by state.
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 FDA: New Treatments and Technology


FDA panel votes to remove long-used osteoporosis drug over cancer risk
The Associated Press via Fox News
A panel of federal health experts says a long-established bone strengthening drug should no longer be used by women because there is little evidence it works and it may actually increase the risk of cancer. The Food and Drug Administration panel voted 12-9 that the risks of the inhalable osteoporosis drug outweigh its benefits when used to treat brittle bones.
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FDA reviewing hemophilia B drug
The Associated Press via Bloomberg Businessweek
Biogen Idec Inc. said the Food and Drug Administration is now reviewing its application for a new hemophilia treatment. The company's drug rFIXFc is designed to treat hemophilia B, and Biogen said it lasts longer than current drugs. That would allow patients to endure fewer treatments. Biogen said the FDA will conduct a 10-month review, which means a decision would be due by early January.
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FAST FACTS
"Signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease usually begin in childhood, and are caused by the sickling of red blood cells, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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