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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Study gives hope of altering genes to repel HIV
The New York Times
The idea of genetically altering people's cells to make them resist the virus that causes AIDS may seem like a pipe dream, but a new report suggests it can be done. The research involves the first use in humans of "gene editing," a treatment that zeros in on a particular gene and disables it. In 12 people infected with HIV, scientists used the technique to get rid of a protein on the patients' immune cells that the virus must latch onto to invade the cells.
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Are you musical or tone deaf? Genes may be key
HealthDay News
Inheriting certain inner-ear genes may make for top-notch musical chops. A study by Finnish scientists suggests that the genes that influence the structure of auditory pathways — the structures that form the inner ear — may play a significant role in musical ability. "It's very interesting that they identified genetic regions that may be associated with brain mechanisms involved in the abilities to perceive, appreciate and perhaps even perform music," said Robert Bilder, director of the Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, at the University of California, Los Angeles.
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Researchers identify candidate genes associated with free radicals
Medical Xpress
Researchers led by a University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences faculty member have identified candidate genes associated with disease-causing free radicals. By identifying the specific genes that influence the cell's ability to fight free radicals — the reactive molecules strongly linked with a variety of chronic diseases — researchers say the findings can be a starting point for future studies aimed at the origin of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, for example.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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Newly discovered gene may shed light on certain brain disorders
HealthDay News via Heatlh.com
Scientists who discovered a gene that links the thickness of the brain's gray matter to intelligence say their finding might help improve understanding of brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. The team looked at the cerebral cortex, which is the outside layer of the human brain.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine a cost-effective way to tailor drug therapy after stents
Health Canal
Genetic testing can help doctors choose the most effective and economical drugs to prevent blood clots in the half a million patients in the U.S. who receive coronary stents each year, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco researcher. The work, reported in the Feb. 18, 2014 Annals of Internal Medicine, demonstrates that genetically guided personalized medicine, often perceived as pricier than traditional approaches, can both lower costs and increase the quality of healthcare.
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Another kind of personalized medicine: Custom-made surgical robots built for 1 patient
MedCity News
Veronica Combs writes: In addition to the standard visual craziness at SXSW — bizarro mascots and Grumpy Cat on the Game of Thrones set — I saw a very welcome visual statement: three women speaking about robots in the OR. Katherine Kuchenbecker, Allison Okamura and Catherine Mohr talked about robots in the OR, how they are used now and how they are being adapted and revised and improved. Mohr is the senior director of medical research for Intuitive Surgical.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Protein synthesis studied in stem cells for the first time
Medical News Today
A new breakthrough in stem cell research has occurred, thanks to scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. The researchers claim that protein synthesis — an essential biological process &mdahs; can be studied in adult stem cells. This is something that scientists have been previously unable to accomplish.
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Scientist who created STAP stem cells says studies should be withdrawn
Los Angeles Times
A number of scientists have been grumbling for weeks about a pair of breakthrough stem cell studies that seemed too good to be true. Now one of the senior researchers who worked on the papers agrees that they may be right. The studies, which were published in January by the journal Nature, described a surprisingly simple method of transforming mature cells into pluripotent stem cells capable of regenerating any type of tissue in the body.
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Japanese scientist wants own 'breakthrough' stem cell study retracted
Reuters via CBS News
A Japanese scientist called on Monday for his own headline-grabbing study on stem cells to be withdrawn from publication, saying its findings had now been thrown into too much doubt. The research — hailed when it came out in January as a breakthrough that could herald a new era of medical biology — was covered widely in Japan and across the world after it was published in the highly reputable science journal Nature.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


The future of healthcare is social, and techie
USA Today
Your favorite social apps will soon enhance more than just your lifestyle. If you think it's cool sharing a dish at your favorite restaurant with your friends via Facebook or Twitter, imagine using social media to quit smoking, lose weight or avoid a debilitating knee injury or heart attack.
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Technology companies eye health market
The Financial Times
When Google announced a venture last year to engage in "moon shot" thinking on health, wellbeing and ageing, it was mocked by critics as being another sign of the Internet group's overweening ambition. Not only did the company want to own all our data and dominate our online lives, it wanted to extend the relationship in perpetuity by solving death.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study gives hope of altering genes to repel HIV
The New York Times
The idea of genetically altering people's cells to make them resist the virus that causes AIDS may seem like a pipe dream, but a new report suggests it can be done.

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Viruses in 700-year-old human feces have antibiotic resistance genes
Medical News Today
Though digging through a latrine from the 14th century is not the most glamorous of tasks, scientists have found viruses that contain genes for antibiotic resistance in fossilized human feces from ancient Belgium.

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Rare mutation kills off gene responsible for diabetes
The New York Times
A new study based on genetic testing of 150,000 people has found a rare mutation that protects even fat people from getting Type 2 diabetes.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Rating sites becoming an important tool for patients
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Despite physicians' dislike of online rating sites, a survey finds patients are increasingly relying on them when shopping for a new doctor. A survey conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School found that when choosing a doctor, physician rating sites weren't ranked as high as other factors such as word of mouth from family and friends or whether a physician accepts the patient's insurance. But there is evidence the rating sites have become an important tool. And use of them is likely to continue growing.
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Pressure on governors to expand Medicaid under Obamacare
Forbes
As millions of newly eligible Americans sign up for Medicaid health insurance for the poor under the Affordable Care Act, pressure builds on states and their Republican governors that have balked at going along with the health law's expansion of the program. Under the law, states have a choice about whether to participate in the expansion of Medicaid benefits. There are 26 states and the District of Columbia that have expanded Medicaid in 2014.
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New health insurance marketplaces signing up few uninsured Americans
The Washington Post
The new health insurance marketplaces appear to be making little headway in signing up Americans who lack insurance, the Affordable Care Act's central goal, according to a pair of new surveys. Only 1 in 10 uninsured people who qualify for private plans through the new marketplaces enrolled as of last month, one of the surveys shows. The other found that about half of uninsured adults have looked for information on the online exchanges or planned to look.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves treatment for pediatric enzyme disorder
The News Journal
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Vimizim, the first FDA-approved treatment for a rare pediatric enzyme disorder called Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA, also known as Morquio A syndrome. The drug, marketed by California-based Novato, was granted priority review by the FDA.
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Chelsea wins US approval for fainting medicine Northera
Bloomberg
Chelsea Therapeutics International Ltd. won U.S. approval for its drug to prevent sudden drops in blood pressure, the company's first product to reach the market. The medicine, called Northera, was cleared for sale to prevent patients with nervous system disorders from the blood pressure crash that can lead to dizziness and fainting, the Food and Drug Administration said in a statement.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Sequencing genes can pinpoint rare illnesses — Might it also help with other problems? (New Scientist via The Washington Post)
Telemedicine: The future of medicine (Rosemary Sparacio)
Rare mutation kills off gene responsible for diabetes (6) (')
Alzheimer's in a dish: Stem cells from patients offer model and drug-discovery platform for early-onset form of disease (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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