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Please click here to view Eisai's 2012 Oncology Digest. The PDF contains two articles and the final oncology digest.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

 




GENOMICS

Selling your most personal item: You
Wired
If you thought personalized advertising based on your Facebook status updates, Gmail content or online browsing behavior was creepy, just you wait. The era of genetic-based advertising is coming, and it could be just as profitable.
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Gene therapy cures leukemia in 8 days
New Scientist
Within just eight days of starting a novel gene therapy, David Aponte's "incurable" leukemia had vanished. For four other patients, the same happened within eight weeks, although one later died from a blood clot unrelated to the treatment, and another after relapsing.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
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IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


Obesity tied to DNA regulation
MedPage Today
Body mass index and other environmental factors likely have an impact on the way genes are expressed, researchers reported. In a genome-wide study, about 20 regions across 11 autosomes had at least one significant association between BMI and DNA methylation, researchers said.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Researchers moving closer to personalized medicine for children with cancer
The Medical News
Pediatric researchers, investigating the biology of brain tumors in children, are finding that crucial differences in how the same gene is mutated may call for different treatments. A new study offers glimpses into how scientists will be using the ongoing flood of gene-sequencing data to customize treatments based on very specific mutations in a child's tumor.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Discover the Concentra Difference.

Concentra offers medical practice expertise, operational and peer support, and long-term stability to enable your professional and financial success. Our providers work consistent schedules that encourage healthy work-life balance, and experience the satisfaction of working in an environment designed to reduce administrative burden while allowing more time for patient care.
 


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Scientists re-program cells as nerve cells
United Press International
Swedish scientists working in the field of cell therapy say they've found it's possible to re-program other cells to become nerve cells, directly in the brain. Two years ago researchers at Lund University re-programmed human skin cells into dopamine-producing nerve cells, without having to go through the stem cell stage.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Genetics may be tied to breast cancer risk in unexpected ways (HealthDay News)
Super protein that can cut DNA, revolutionize genetic engineering (Gizmodo)
College student's healing gel could potentially eliminate use of bandages (Medical Daily)
Personalized brain transplants: Skin cells to brain cells achieved in primates (Medgadget)
FDA probes new pancreas risks with diabetes drugs (The Associated Press via USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Cancer cells disguised as stem cells gain extra resistance
Medical Xpress
Why are certain cancer cells so resistant? The answer may be that they have either retained or acquired attributes normally found in stem cells. Stem cells are very resilient and have an exceptional capacity to protect themselves. If cancer cells are able to take on such attributes, it is no wonder that it may be difficult to get the better of them.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Are doctors' hands clean? This wristband knows
MIT Technology Review
A startup called IntelligentM wants to make hospitals healthier by encouraging workers to clean their hands properly. Its solution is a bracelet that vibrates when the wearer has scrubbed sufficiently, giving employees a way to check their habits and letting employers know who is and isn't doing things right.
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Scientists develop 'under the skin' blood-testing chip
The Wall Street Journal
A tiny prototype lab-on-a-chip inserted under a patient’s skin can test for up to five substances in the blood simultaneously and give instant results via a cellphone. The half-inch-long device transmits data via Bluetooth and its Swiss developers hope it will be available to patients within four years.
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Doctor-owned device suppliers deemed inherently suspect
Bloomberg
Doctor-owned businesses that act as middlemen between medical device makers and hospitals are "inherently suspect" and some of their practices may violate U.S. anti-kickback laws, a government inspector general said.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Large companies increasingly offering workers only high-deductible health plans
Kaiser Health News
Historically, one of the perks of working at a big company has been generous health benefits with modest out-of-pocket costs. But increasingly, large companies are offering their employees only one option: a plan with a relatively high deductible linked to a savings account for medical expenses.
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9 in 10 health plans still tied to FFS model
HealthLeaders Media
The Catalyst for Payment Reform, an independent, nonprofit group working on behalf of large healthcare purchasers, Tuesday released its first annual National Scorecard on Payment Reform, which showed that 89.1 percent of these payments are still based on the traditional fee-for-service model and not tied to improving quality outcomes or reducing waste.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Analysis: Allergy drops a good alternative to shots
USA Today
Under-the-tongue drops instead of allergy shots may be a good option for some patients who suffer from allergies and allergic asthma, according to a new analysis. Researchers looked at studies in which researchers put small amounts of an inhaled allergen, such as mold and pollen, in liquid drops under the tongue. The review found that such drop therapy is a safe and effective alternative to a weekly allergy shot for boosting immunity.
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FAST FACTS
"An estimated more than 22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer will occur in the United States in 2013, according to the National Cancer Institute."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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