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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

New study explains evolution of duplicate genes
Medical Xpress
From time to time, living cells will accidently make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity.
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Roche will work with Oryzon on cancer-suppressing genes
Bloomberg
Roche Holding AG agreed to buy the rights from Spain's Oryzon Genomics SA to an experimental drug that's meant to switch on genes that block the growth of cancer, a new area in the crowded field of potential oncology therapies. Roche will pay Barcelona-based Oryzon $21 million up front and for meeting near-term targets, plus payments that may exceed $500 million if the drug meets other goals.
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Procrastination is in your genes
TIME
Everybody has put off today what can be done tomorrow. And that might be because procrastination is in your genes, a new study published in the journal Psychological Science suggests. But when it comes to delaying, not everyone is created equal. Some are significantly more likely to procrastinate than others, so researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder looked into whether this bad habit might have its roots in genetics by surveying 181 identical twin pairs and 166 fraternal twin pairs.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine on a wearable patch
Engineering.com
Imagine treating a debilitating illness simply by slapping on an electronic patch and forgetting that your condition even exists. While that future may seem fantastical and far-fetched, it could become a reality in the very near future. According to a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, Korean researchers have developed a prototype patch that can measure muscle movement, administer medicine and keep a log of everything it has recorded.
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Simple blood test might be enough to diagnose most forms of 'solid' cancer, with personalized medicine
Medical Daily
What if all forms of cancer could be detected by a simple blood test performed yearly in your doctor's office? Personalized medicine, which uses information from a person's genome to diagnose disease and select the most effective treatments, may soon make that possible. Researchers at Stanford's School of Medicine have developed a new personalized method for detecting disease by monitoring levels of cancerous DNA circulating in the blood.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Ears, noses grown from stem cells in lab dishes
The Associated Press via CBS News
In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells. It is among several labs around the world, including in the U.S., that are working on the futuristic idea of growing custom-made organs in the lab.
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Stem cells show promise for stroke recovery
HealthDay News via WebMD
In an early test, researchers report they've safely injected stem cells into the brains of 18 patients who had suffered strokes. And two of the patients showed significant improvement. All the patients saw some improvement in weakness or paralysis within six months of their procedures. Although three people developed complications related to the surgery, they all recovered. There were no adverse reactions to the transplanted stem cells themselves, the study authors said.
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Stem cell researchers just figured out how to create new embryos
Gizmodo
A team of researchers from the University of Virginia just made scientific history: They figured out how to turn stem cells into full blown fish embryos. In other words, scientists can now control embryonic development, a key to being able to grow organs and even entire organism from stem cells. "We have generated an animal by just instructing embryonic cells the right way," said Chris Thisse, who made the discovery with her husband Bernard. She added, "If we know how to instruct embryonic cells, we can pretty much do what we want."
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Google Glass gets wearable neuro app
Healthcare IT News
In a development that could help providers with remote patient monitoring and other telehealth applications, one developer has created a neuroimaging app designed to work with Google Glass. Created by Personal Neuro Devices, a Canadian application developer staffed with neuroscientists and biochemical engineers, the technology, called Introspect: the PND Wearable, is designed to enable Google Glass to give neuro-feedback to clinicians and caregivers.
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Even small medical advances can mean big jumps in bills
The New York Times
Catherine Hayley is saving up for an important purchase: an updated version of the tiny digital pump at her waist that delivers lifesaving insulin under her skin. Such devices, which tailor insulin dosing more precisely to the body’s needs, have transformed the lives of people with Type 1 diabetes like Hayley.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
New study explains evolution of duplicate genes
Medical Xpress
From time to time, living cells will accidently make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity.

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Obesity linked to genetics
MedicalDaily
Thinking of carbohydrates, many people immediately picture bread, potatoes and pasta, but carbs come in many healthy forms — whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.

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Gene therapy's big comeback
Forbes
Elliott Sigal earned a reputation at Bristol-Myers Squibb as one of the drug industry's best research chiefs. His bets on risky technologies like cancer immunotherapy and new types of diabetes drugs helped Bristol turn from a laggard into a growth stock.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Legal or not, marijuana cannot be ignored by healthcare providers
By Denise A. Valenti
Two states — Colorado and Washington — have approved cannabis for both recreational use and medical use, an additional 18 approve the use of cannabis for medical purposes and an another 13 states have legislation pending. Regardless of a healthcare professional's position on medicinal cannabis or interest in prescribing its use, providers are expected by patients and the public to have the background necessary to provide guidance regarding the use of cannabis. Obtaining an education about a substance that is restricted, controversial and has few human studies on its use can seem daunting.
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Number of Americans without health insurance reaches new low
Los Angeles Times
The share of Americans without health insurance has dropped to the lowest level since before President Barack Obama took office, according to a new national survey that provides more evidence the healthcare law is extending coverage to millions of the previously uninsured. Just 14.7 percent of adults lacked coverage in the second half of March, down from 18 percent in the last quarter of 2013, the survey from Gallup found.
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Exchange enrollment exceeds expectations, but too early to determine impact
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
The Obama administration's last-ditch efforts to get people to sign up for insurance through the insurance exchanges paid off as the total enrollment numbers exceeded 7 million by the March 31 open enrollment deadline. The enrollment data surprised nearly everyone. Just weeks before the deadline, the Congressional Budget Office revised its estimate of new enrollees down to 6 million. But while proponents of the Affordable Care Act had reason to celebrate, there are still many unknowns that will determine the long-term success of the law.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Hand-held treatment for overdoses is approved
The New York Times
Federal health regulators approved a drug overdose treatment device that experts say will provide a powerful lifesaving tool in the midst of a surging epidemic of prescription drug abuse. Similar to an EpiPen used to stop allergic reactions to bee stings, the easy-to-use injector — small enough to tuck into a pocket or a medicine cabinet — can be used by the relatives or friends of people who have overdosed.
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MannKind says FDA delays decision on inhaled insulin treatment
Reuters
MannKind Corp said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration extended the review date of its inhaled insulin treatment by three months, sending the company's shares down as much as 22 percent before the bell. The news comes less than a week after an advisory panel to the FDA recommended approving the treatment, Afrezza, but said longer-term studies would be required to gauge the risk of lung cancer and other potential side effects.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ancient virus DNA gives stem cells the power to transform (National Geographic)
Patients can now choose not to know their own DNA secrets (Scientific American)
Alimera makes 4th bid for eye treatment approval from FDA (Reuters)
1st stem cell study of bipolar disorder offers hope for better treatments (Fox News)
Is gender a drug safety issue in the era of personalized medicine? (PharmExec)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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