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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Researchers create road map for gene expression
R&D Magazine
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a road map that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.
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Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer
Bioscience Technology
Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. Our understanding of the biological processes that cause cancer is limited. UV light and smoking are two well-understood cancer-causing processes.
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Study: Gene panels may be useful, cheaper alternative to whole-genome sequencing
Medical Xpress
As many as 10 percent of women with a personal or family history of breast or ovarian cancer have at least one genetic mutation that, if known, would prompt their doctors to recommend changes in their care, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Plant-derived nanotubes provide personalized DNA delivery
LiveScience
Personalized medicine took one step closer to reality recently with the development of plant-derived nanotubes. These nanotubes — tiny structures several hundred times thinner than a human hair — hone in on specific tissues in the body and deliver their cargo, in this study's case a healthy gene to help override a dysfunctional copy.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Scientists give stem cells a performance boost by putting them on steroids
Gizmag
Stem cells are highly promising for the treatment of everything from HIV to leukemia to baldness. In many cases, however, a great number of them must be used in order have a noticeable effect, which makes treatments impractical or expensive. Now, scientists at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that a smaller number of stem cells can still get the job done, if they're first hopped up on steroids.
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Lab grows blood for human trials
CNET
"Real blood is for suckers." That's a promotional slogan for Tru Blood, the fictional beverage that helps wean vampires off human blood in HBO's show "True Blood." Soon, however, it might become a catchphrase in hospitals across the globe, as researchers in Ireland and the U.K. work toward the commercial creation of red blood cells in the lab.
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Modified stem cells offer potential pathway to treat Alzheimer's disease
Medical Xpress
UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Healthcare and technology: Head in the cloud, feet on the ground
Wired
As an on-demand society, we rely on our smartphones, tablets, and other cloud-connected devices to provide immediate access to information, complementing and enhancing every aspect of our lives. And when physicians go to work, they don't set these expectations aside. Face it: if the odds were high that your paycheck would not be correctly deposited into your online bank account, you wouldn't bank online. But that's not the case.
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Google sells out of white Glass model
CNN
Tuesday, for the first time, Google Glass was made available to the general public. As part of the one-day-only offering, anyone in the U.S. could buy the $1,500 face-mounted computers and get a free pair of glass or sunglass frames. Google isn't sharing any sales numbers for the day, so it's difficult to divine how successful its first open-sales event has been. There have not been reports of the Google Glass sales site crashing or customers being turned away.
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Healthcare due for technology 'shake up'
Healthcare IT News
With consumers entranced by fast-evolving technologies and accustomed to price competition, healthcare is set to be transformed by innovations from other sectors of the economy such as retail and telecommunications, according to a new study by PwC's Health Research Institute.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Researchers create road map for gene expression
R&D Magazine
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a road map that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases.

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New study explains evolution of duplicate genes
Medical Xpress
From time to time, living cells will accidently make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process.

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Procrastination is in your genes
TIME
Everybody has put off today what can be done tomorrow. And that might be because procrastination is in your genes, a new study published in the journal Psychological Science suggests.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Overcoming communication challenges of EHRs
By Jessica Taylor
The transition to electronic health records can bring some concerns for healthcare providers, including workflow, training, privacy and security. But one of the most important issues is communication, and many clinicians are concerned that using a computer with a patient will hinder communication. To overcome these challenges and make sure your patient has your undivided attention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has provided five communication behaviors for the integration of EHRs into your practice.
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Tax preparers' new role: Health coverage advisers
The New York Times
Iris I. Burnell, an adviser at Jackson Hewitt Tax Service, has prepared scores of returns in the last few months, as she does every year ahead of the April 15 filing deadline. But many of her consultations this year have also included educating clients about the tax implications of the Affordable Care Act.
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In surprise move, CMS announces Medicare Advantage pay increase
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
After proposing in February a 1.9 percent cut in reimbursement to insurers in the Medicare Advantage program, Medicare made a surprise announcement and said there would, instead, be a 0.4 percent increase. This is the second year Medicare has reversed proposed cuts despite a provision in the Affordable Care Act to bring pay parity between traditional Medicare and Medicare Advantage. The decision came as a surprise, especially to insurance industry leaders who were pushing for rates to remain unchanged.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Allergy shot or allergy pill? FDA approves new option
Mother Nature Network
If you enjoy going to the doctor's office to get allergy shots for months on end, then more power to you. For the other 99.99 percent of allergy sufferers, relief may be headed your way in the form of a pill developed to replace shots for those who are allergic to pollen. Oralair, from the French company Stallergenes, has been approved for people ages 10 to 65 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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FDA approves Otezla, a new pill for psoriatic arthritis
Healthline
In giving a nod to Celgene's Otezla, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is offering active psoriatic arthritis patients a new treatment option that is taken orally, in pill form. Injected corticosteroids, tumor necrosis factor blockers, and interleukin-12/interleukin-23 inhibitors are among the treatments currently available.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Google Glass gets wearable neuro app (Healthcare IT News)
Stem cells show promise for stroke recovery (HealthDay News via WebMD)
Even small medical advances can mean big jumps in bills (The New York Times)
Simple blood test might be enough to diagnose most forms of 'solid' cancer, with personalized medicine (Medical Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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