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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Study: Fainting may be genetic
Yahoo News
Fainting may have a genetic origin, new findings suggest, a discovery that could shed light on its mysterious causes, researchers say. Fainting, technically known as syncope, is a brief loss of consciousness after the body reacts to certain triggers, such as the sight of blood, injury, pain, medical procedures, stuffy environments, prolonged standing and frightening thoughts.
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Can you patent human genes?
ABC News
The Supreme Court soon will hear a challenge to Myriad's patents originally brought by scientists, researchers and patients who believe the patents stand in the way of further research on the genes and limit the availability of testing. The ACLU is representing the groups and argues that the Court should invalidate the patents because they cover a product of nature and not an actual invention.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DNA.


The human genome, then and now
The New York Times
Eight years of work, thousands of researchers around the world, $1 billion spent — and finally it was done. On April 14, 2003, a decade ago, scientists announced that they had completed the Human Genome Project, compiling a list of the three billion letters of genetic code that make up what they considered to be a sort of everyperson's DNA.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Once dismissed as junk, some DNA found to play key role in brain development
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Scientists at University of California, San Francisco have found that sections of DNA once considered "junk" actually play a key role in brain development and may be linked to severe neurological diseases. Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the scientists said they made their discovery in mice.
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Use of personalized medicine to select adjuvant breast cancer therapy
OncLive
Clinical trials are under way that may change the way risk of recurrence is assessed for early-stage breast cancer patients, allowing for individualization of therapy. In her presentation, Lisa A. Carey, M.D., chief, Division of Hematology and Oncology, at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, highlighted the latest developments in the use of personalized adjuvant therapy and the evolving treatment paradigm.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


FDA clears stem cell clinical trial to recruit ALS patients
Detroit Free Press
VideoBriefA clinical trial using stem cells to halt or even reverse the deadly effect of Lou Gehrig's Disease may soon begin recruiting patients at University of Michigan. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given approval to allow the trial to move on to its next phase, according to the university and the provider of the stem cells, Maryland-based Neuralstem Inc.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    UnitedHealth units hit with $500 million verdict in hepatitis case (Reuters)
Gene therapy cures leukemia in 8 days (New Scientist)
The Supreme Court should invalidate the patent on human DNA (The Washington Post (commentary))
Robot hot among surgeons but FDA taking fresh look (The Associated Press via ABC News)
The debate over stem-cell face-lifts (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FDA rejects new drug for migraines
The New York Times
Only weeks after Allergan spent nearly $1 billion to acquire the rights to a new drug for migraine headaches, the Food and Drug Administration has rejected the product. Allergan said the F.D.A. had declined to approve the drug, Levadex, because of concerns about the manufacturing of the inhaler used to dispense it.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Doctors may soon be able to print bodies to study
Fast.Co.Exist
While it may be a while before we're 3-D printing live organs for human transplant, researchers at Notre Dame are pioneering a medical use for the emerging technology that's ready to be put into action today: using 3-D printers to create educational models of skeletons and soft tissue systems.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How a 3-D printer gave a man his face, life back
The Sydney Morning Herald
surgeons have employed cutting edge three-dimensional printing technology to create a prosthetic face for Eric Moger, 60, in what is thought to be the first procedure of its kind in Britain.

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Breast cancer genetic testing gets covered by healthcare reform
MyHealthNewsDaily
Genetic testing for breast cancer will be covered under the Affordable Care Act, potentially saving women who need the test thousands of dollars.

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Gene therapy cures leukemia in 8 days
New Scientist
Within just eight days of starting a novel gene therapy, David Aponte's "incurable" leukemia had vanished.

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Amazing new technological advances in healthcare
By Rosemary Sparacio
It probably does not surprise anyone just how much technology has affected our daily lives. But the impact of technology in healthcare has been and continues to be nothing short of astounding. And there is always more to come. At the Society of Interventional Radiology's 38th Annual Scientific Meeting, three new treatment advances were discussed: irreversible electroporation, cryoablation and cryoneurolysis. Here is a closer look at what each has to offer.
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Industry Pulse: Which new treatment offers the most promise going forward?
ANSWER NOW


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Medicare could save millions by limiting advance payments to insurers
Kaiser Health News
Medicare could earn up to $111 million annually if it limited insurers' ability to retain investment earnings on the billions they are paid through the prescription drug program, according to a government report.
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More docs joining forces in ACOs
MedPage Today
The number of physician-led accountable care organizations (ACOs) has recently surpassed the number led by hospitals, becoming the largest backers of the payment and delivery model, an analysis showed.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA blocks generic version of crushable OxyContin
The Courier-Journal via USA Today
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has blocked generic drug manufacturers from producing versions of the old crushable form of OxyContin that was widely abused across the nation — a decision applauded by politicians and law enforcement.
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FAST FACTS
"An estimated more than 22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer will occur in the United States in 2013, according to the National Cancer Institute."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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