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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

New research: Chronic pain may be genetic
Medical News Today
Ever wonder why some people seem to have a higher tolerance for pain than others? New research — due to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia — suggests the answer is genetic. The research forms part of an investigation into the causes of chronic pain.
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DNA study: Why Neanderthals, modern humans are so different
Reuters via The Huffington Post
How can creatures as different in body and mind as present-day humans and their extinct Neanderthal cousins be 99.84 percent identical genetically? Four years after scientists discovered that the two species' genomes differ by a fraction of a percent, geneticists said they have an explanation: the cellular equivalent of on/off switches that determine whether DNA is activated or not.
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Identical twins, one case of Down syndrome: A genetic mystery
Los Angeles Times
A rare occurrence in the earliest days of a pregnancy produces an unusual and mystifying outcome: Identical twin fetuses are conceived of the same meeting of egg and sperm. And despite their shared DNA, one of the twins has Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual impairment, but the other does not.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Colorado center will offer treatments targeted by patient DNA
ModernHealthcare
Four Colorado healthcare organizations planning a $63 million Center for Personalized Medicine aim to use patients' DNA to predict their risk of disease and develop targeted treatments based on the genetic information. University of Colorado Health, a four-hospital system based in Aurora, will contribute $26 million over the next five years toward the project. Its partners include its Anschutz Medical Campus neighbors: the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Children's Hospital Colorado and the University Physicians medical group.
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Genomics startup learns from 23andme's troubles
InformationWeek
BaseHealth is not the first company to suggest that access to genomic analysis could help us manage our health better, but the startup, publicly launching its product, promises to do a better job of putting genomic information in context.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


New initiative could ban funding of embryonic stem cell research in Europe
Forbes
Encouraged by a recent European Union court decision banning the patenting of technologies that use human embryonic stem cells, a group of pro-life organizations has launched an initiative which, if it passes, will cut funding of embryonic stem cell research in the E.U.
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In stem cell research, health benefits outweigh the risks of copying humans
The Washington Post
For the last few years, the promising field of stem cell research has focused on a technique that skirts various ethical concerns about the treatment of human embryos and the potential to clone whole human beings. But recently, U.S. and South Korean researchers announced that they went ahead with a different technique, successfully creating stem cells cloned from the normal skin cells of adults.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


FDA proposes program to speed approval of medical devices
Reuters
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed speeding up medical device approvals for patients who have no other treatment options through a new program focused on earlier and more frequent interactions between companies and FDA staff. The Expedited Access Premarket Approval Application program is a response to criticisms by policymakers, patient groups and industry that the FDA process for approving medical devices is inefficient and slow, delaying patients' access to new, helpful products.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
New research: Chronic pain may be genetic
Medical News Today
Ever wonder why some people seem to have a higher tolerance for pain than others? New research — due to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia — suggests the answer is genetic.

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Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer
Bioscience Technology
Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development.

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Researchers create road map for gene expression
R&D Magazine
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a road map that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Healthcare spending's recent surge stirs unease
The New York Times
It's back. For years, because of structural changes in the healthcare delivery system and the deep economic downturn, the healthcare "cost curve" — as economists and policy makers call it — had bent. Health spending was growing no faster than spending on other goods or services, an anomaly in 50 years of government accounts.
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Despite optimism, Affordable Care Act has only chipped away at core goal of reducing uninsured
The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report
The federal healthcare overhaul is providing coverage for millions of Americans, but it has only chipped away at one of its core goals: to sharply reduce the number of people without insurance. President Barack Obama announced that 8 million people have signed up for coverage through new insurance exchanges, but many barriers remain.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves new Type 2 diabetes drug
HealthDay News via WebMD
Millions of Americans with Type 2 diabetes have a new treatment option with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of a once-weekly injectable drug, Tanzeum. The FDA described Tanzeum as a "glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist — a hormone that helps normalize patients' blood sugar levels.
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FDA lifts its hold on Juno's cutting-edge cancer drug after deaths trigger delay
FierceBiotech
The FDA has lifted a clinical hold placed on a study at Memorial Sloan-Kettering of Juno Therapeutics' cutting-edge approach to treating cancer using genetically tailored T cells. "I confirm that the FDA has rapidly lifted the hold, as expected," wrote MSK's Michel Sadelain in an email to FierceBiotech.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Plant-derived nanotubes provide personalized DNA delivery (LiveScience)
Allergy shot or allergy pill? FDA approves new option (Mother Nature Network)
Study: Gene panels may be useful, cheaper alternative to whole-genome sequencing (Medical Xpress)
Healthcare due for technology 'shake up' (Healthcare IT News)
In surprise move, CMS announces Medicare Advantage pay increase ( By Pamela Lewis Dolan)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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