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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Y chromosome discovery strikes men off the endangered species list
Forbes
Feminists and biologists alike have been predicting the end of men for decades. But it appears the hairier sex may have a little while longer left on this planet if a new piece of genetic research is anything to go by. Supporters of the so-called "rotting Y" theory believe that men's days are numbered due to the Y chromosome, which has shed hundreds of genes during the last 300 million years of evolution.
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Controlling fear by modifying DNA
Medical Xpress
For many people, fear of flying or of spiders skittering across the lounge room floor is more than just a momentary increase in heart rate and a pair of sweaty palms. It's a hard-core phobia that can lead to crippling anxiety, but an international team of researchers, including neuroscientists from The University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute, may have found a way to silence the gene that feeds this fear.
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Can you turn off your fat genes?
Prevention via Fox News
You can't change your genes, but you just might be able to change how they work in your body. And in the case of those that play a role in fat loss, pumping iron could be key. In addition to affecting the genes in your muscles, resistance training also influences the genes in your fat, says a new study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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Nature and nurture: Baby's development is affected by genes and conditions in the womb
Medical Xpress
A recent study led by A*STAR's Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences found that genetics as well as the environment in the womb play important roles in the development of the baby. The effort by the international team of scientists and clinicians is the world's first attempt to discover how genetic and environmental factors affect the human epigenome.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Researchers create personalized, disease-specific stem cells
redOrbit
Researchers reported the creation of the first disease-specific line of embryonic stem cells made with a patient's own DNA, a major breakthrough in the field of regenerative medicine. The achievement marks the first time cloning technologies have been used to generate stem cells that are genetically matched to adult patients.
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Genealogy and biogeography meet personalized medicine
Science Codex
Biogeographical data is useful in screening for disease risk and drug sensitivity associated with certain ethnic groups. A team of researchers, including an investigator from Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has developed a tool to accurately identify the biogeography of worldwide individuals. Previous tools were accurate in identifying place of origin within homogeneous European populations but highly inaccurate for places with significant immigration, such as the U.S.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cell therapy to fix the heart: A house of cards about to fall?
Forbes
For more than a decade cardiac stem cell therapy has attracted an enormous amount of attention, promise and research dollars. Now an original and important new study published in BMJ finds that many of the most promising results in the field are illusory and that the potential benefits of stem cells to treat heart disease are probably far more modest than we've been led to believe.
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Cloning used to make stem cells from adult humans
CNN
For the first time, cloning technologies have been used to generate stem cells that are genetically matched to adult patients. Fear not: No legitimate scientist is in the business of cloning humans. But cloned embryos can be used as a source for stem cells that match a patient and can produce any cell type in that person.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Could Google Glass help doctors save lives?
CBS News
In a few years, you can expect to see doctors wearing Google Glass, just as readily as you might see them wearing a stethoscope, said a group of medical professionals and Glass explorers gathered at Google's Cambridge office recently. Among the Glass explorers, who were gathered to discuss potential Glass uses in healthcare, was Dr. Rafael Grossmann, the first general surgeon to use this device in the operating room.
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Newly approved telehealth guideline causes a stir
Modern Healthcare
The Federation of State Medical Boards approved a model telehealth policy that's made some providers of these services happy and others, well, not so much, because of its emphasis on using video rather than audio technology for a first patient visit.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Y chromosome discovery strikes men off the endangered species list
Forbes
Feminists and biologists alike have been predicting the end of men for decades. But it appears the hairier sex may have a little while longer left on this planet if a new piece of genetic research is anything to go by.

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Identical twins, one case of Down syndrome: A genetic mystery
Los Angeles Times
A rare occurrence in the earliest days of a pregnancy produces an unusual and mystifying outcome: Identical twin fetuses are conceived of the same meeting of egg and sperm.

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New research: Chronic pain may be genetic
Medical News Today
Ever wonder why some people seem to have a higher tolerance for pain than others? New research — due to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia — suggests the answer is genetic.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Impressive new smartphone apps in health and medicine
By Rosemary Sparacio
Smartphones are just about everywhere. In the U.S. alone, more than 91 million Americans now use a smartphone. Of course, these devices are much more than just a phone. The fact that there are apps for many areas in personal health and medicine is a logical step to help individuals take better care of themselves and for researchers to find ways for individuals and physicians to do just that. Clearly, the ongoing research, development and availability of health apps is on the forefront of medicine and shows no signs of slowing down.
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Who really pays for healthcare? It might surprise you
USA Today
Eight million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama said this month. Millions more obtained new coverage through the Medicaid program for the poor. Full implementation of the health law and its wider coverage, new taxes and shifting subsidies have renewed discussions of winners and losers, makers and moochers.
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New research showing promise in contraceptives for women
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Many contraceptive methods are available in the market. However, they are associated with the risk of side effects and with chances of drug failure. The cost of the contraceptives is also important, but many of the new contraceptives are not affordable for millions of women. There is an urgent need to develop effective and affordable contraceptives for women with different needs and different age groups. Here is a look at some of the different methods, along with new research being developed.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA warning on pain injections comes too late for some
Bloomberg Businessweek
One of the most popular treatments for neck and back pain — steroid shots — can be dangerous, and in rare cases can cause paralysis and death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned. The FDA is late to the game when it comes to concern about the safety of the shots when they're injected into the epidural space of the spine.
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FDA warns against bogus autism treatments
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Companies that make false or misleading claims that their products and therapies can treat or even cure autism face possible legal action if they continue, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned them. As part of National Autism Awareness Month in April, the FDA wanted to inform consumers about bogus autism therapies.
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FDA approves 1st targeted drug for advanced stomach cancer
Health Canal
Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    DNA study: Why Neanderthals, modern humans are so different (Reuters via The Huffington Post)
Genomics startup learns from 23andme's troubles (InformationWeek)
DNA study: Why Neanderthals, modern humans are so different (5) (')
Despite optimism, Affordable Care Act has only chipped away at core goal of reducing uninsured (The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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