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Spring Managed Care Forum
May 2-3, 2013
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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

How genomic research could improve healthcare
CIO
The cost of mapping an individual genome is quickly dropping. The potential benefits for improving the care individual patients as well as entire populations are immense. So, too, are the obstacles to getting all stakeholders — healthcare providers, researchers, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies and the patients themselves — to share what they've learned.
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Mutation is associated with increased risk of death for patients with PTC
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Presence of the genetic mutation BRAF V600E was significantly associated with increased cancer-related death among patients with papillary thyroid cancer, according to a new study. However, because overall mortality in PTC is low and the association was not independent of tumor characteristics, how to use this information to manage mortality risk in patients with PTC is unclear.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Mount Sinai links genetics, EHRs for personalized medicine
EHR Intelligence
We might not have entered the era of designer babies or complete and infallible screening for all genetic diseases, but a patient's DNA is becoming increasingly important when practicing medicine, holding a wealth of information that can predict responses to certain therapies and help physicians tailor treatment plans to an individual patient’s needs.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "personalized medicine."


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Toddler born without a windpipe get artificial trachea
ABC News
In a groundbreaking feat of science and surgery, a Korean toddler born without a windpipe received an artificial trachea made from her own stem cells.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Does your DNA say much about your health? (The Washington Post)
Study defines link between rare liver disease, IBD (Yahoo News)
Personalized medicine and nonsmall cell lung cancer (MedPage Today)
The dual-eligible dilemma (Modern Healthcare)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Growing new arteries, bypassing blocked ones
Medical Xpress
Scientific collaborators from Yale School of Medicine and University College London have uncovered the molecular pathway by which new arteries may form after heart attacks, strokes and other acute illnesses bypassing arteries that are blocked.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


3-D motion detection system could prevent shoulder injuries in baseball pitchers
Medical News Today
A new 3-D motion detection system could help identify baseball pitchers who are at risk for shoulder injuries, according to a new study. The system can be used on the field and requires only a laptop computer. Other systems that evaluate pitchers' throwing motions require cameras and other equipment and generally are confined to indoor use.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Tetris therapy against amblyopia
Medgadget
A new therapeutic approach for lazy eye, also known as amblyopia, uses good old Tetris to train the eyes to work together.

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Breast cancer genetic testing gets covered by healthcare reform
MyHealthNewsDaily
Genetic testing for breast cancer will be covered under the Affordable Care Act, potentially saving women who need the test thousands of dollars.

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Doctors may soon be able to print bodies to study
Fast.Co.Exist
While it may be a while before we're 3-D printing live organs for human transplant, researchers at Notre Dame are pioneering a medical use for the emerging technology that's ready to be put into action today: using 3-D printers to create educational models of skeletons and soft tissue systems.

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Most pain apps lack physician input
Internal Medicine News
An evaluation of 222 pain-related smartphone apps showed that many were developed without the input of a health professional, some had inaccurate information, and some of their features weren't as robust as they could be.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Hazardous drugs and worker safety: Emerging regulations
By Matthew D. Zock
California recently introduced Assembly Bill 1202 that would require its state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board to promulgate a standard for hazardous drugs, which includes antineoplastic agents or "chemotherapy." If enacted, California will become the second state to regulate hazardous drug handling in the workplace, as the state of Washington passed a similar bill in 2011 that required its Department of Labor and Industries to adopt a hazardous drugs rule.
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Healthcare's 'dirty little secret:' No one may be coordinating care
Kaiser Health News, The Washington Post
Coordinated care is touted as the key to better and more cost-effective care, and is being encouraged with financial rewards and penalties under the 2010 federal healthcare overhaul, as well as by private insurers. But experts say communication failures remain disturbingly common.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves over-the-counter sales for Plan B
USA Today
Women and girls age 15 and over will soon be able to buy emergency contraception without a prescription. The Food and Drug Administration announced that it was approving Plan B One-Step, also known as the morning-after pill, to be sold in the retail aisle next to other over-the-counter medications. Customers will not have to ask a pharmacist for it.
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Seizure drug may discolor skin, eyes
MedPage Today
The FDA has warned consumers that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine (Potiga) can cause skin and eye discoloration. Use of the drug may cause blue skin discoloration on or around the lips, in nail beds on fingers and toes, and potentially on the face and legs. Discoloration on the white of the eye and inside the eyelids has also been reported, the agency said in a safety communication.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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