This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May 08, 2014

   Home   Mission/Vision    Membership    Corporate Membership    CME/CEU    JMCM    Contact Us

Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

Check out BioDesix VeriStrat test that helps guide second line therapy in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Click here to view a press release on Medicare coverage.

Click here to view a press release on the study being included in Best of ASCO.

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Study: Environment as influential as genes in autism
Reuters via Fox News
Environmental factors are more important than previously thought in leading to autism, as big a factor as genes, according to the largest analysis to date to look at how the brain disorder runs in families. Sven Sandin, who worked on the study at King's College London and Sweden's Karolinska institute, said it was prompted "by a very basic question which parents often ask: 'If I have a child with autism, what is the risk my next child will too?'"
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




The continuing evolution of genes
The New York Times
Each of us carries just over 20,000 genes that encode everything from the keratin in our hair down to the muscle fibers in our toes. It's no great mystery where our own genes came from: our parents bequeathed them to us. And our parents, in turn, got their genes from their parents.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Deepak Chopra on how to modify your own genes
The Huffington Post
Physician and best-selling author Deepak Chopra has an empowering message: You can actually modify your own genes through your actions and behaviors. "We are literally metabolizing something as ephemeral as experience or even meaning," Chopra said in an interview this week at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CEUS: RN, CCM, Safety Training

Get CEUs and Safety Training for your Nurses and Case Managers! Group rates available! CareerSmart offers online CEUs and safety training applicable for Nurses, Case Managers and other healthcare professionals. They are designed to help staff prevent work-related injuries and maintain compliance with mandated continuing education requirements.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicines in late-stage development
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery
As advances in genomics, proteomics and imaging technologies help reveal more about the molecular basis of disease and drug response, biomarkers are increasingly being used to develop diagnostics that could help to differentiate, or stratify, the likely outcomes of therapeutic intervention — an approach often described as personalized medicine.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
What is Solesta?

What does a good day mean for your patients?

LEARN MORE
Pharmaceutical products that make a difference
Forest has well-established franchises in the therapeutic areas of the central nervous and cardiovascular systems and are always exploring new product opportunities. MORE


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells may repair 'irreversible' heart damage
Forbes
Steven Salzberg: In December 2011, I reported on one of the first attempts to inject stem cells into damaged hearts. In that study, published in The Lancet, scientists grew stem cells from patients' own hearts after the patients had suffered serious heart attacks. These were patients who had serious, irreversible heart damage.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Scientists develop methods to convert non-embryonic stem cells into eye cells
News-Medical.net
In two separate studies, scientists have developed methods to convert non-embryonic stem cells into eye cells that could be used to restore sight. The research is being presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in Orlando, Florida.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Potential stroke therapy: Stem cells from teeth form brain-like cells
Medical News Today
Stem cells are cells that are able to differentiate into specialized cell types, aiding tissue regeneration, cardiovascular disease and blood disease treatments. But now, researchers have found that stem cells from teeth grow to resemble brain cells, a discovery they say could be harnessed in the brain for stroke therapy.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Turning medical technology innovation model on its head
USA Today
When Jonathan Pillai's father suffered a heart attack, surgeons inserted a device called a stent to prop open his damaged coronary artery — racking up a whopping 30,000 rupees, or about $5,000 at the time, in medical bills. Although his company shouldered much of the expense, the procedure nearly wiped out his family's savings, forcing them to live for years without a car.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apple hiring efforts point to medical tech integration
CNET
Apple has secretly been bolstering its employee base with several medical professionals, according to a new report. The technology pacesetter has been quietly hiring a medical team made up of senior medical technology executives who previously worked in the biotech field, Reuters is reporting, citing LinkedIn pages and sources who claim to have knowledge of the company's efforts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Environment as influential as genes in autism
Reuters via Fox News
Environmental factors are more important than previously thought in leading to autism, as big a factor as genes, according to the largest analysis to date to look at how the brain disorder runs in families.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Controlling fear by modifying DNA
Medical Xpress
For many people, fear of flying or of spiders skittering across the lounge room floor is more than just a momentary increase in heart rate and a pair of sweaty palms.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Y chromosome discovery strikes men off the endangered species list
Forbes
Feminists and biologists alike have been predicting the end of men for decades. But it appears the hairier sex may have a little while longer left on this planet if a new piece of genetic research is anything to go by.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Poll: Fewer in US lack health insurance, but issues remain
Reuters
The percentage of adults in the United States who lack health insurance has fallen to its lowest rate since 2008, down to about 13 percent in April from a peak of 18 percent last year, according to a Gallup poll released. The decline coincided with the October 2013 launch of the health insurance exchanges that allowed people to buy coverage on their own under the Affordable Care Act and accelerated as the deadline to buy coverage neared, the nonpartisan research organization said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Is overprescribing really to blame for antibiotic resistance?
By Lauren Swan
The World Health Organization recently released a report regarding antimicrobial resistance and how it's being found in every part of the world. According to the WHO, the cause of this resistance is overuse and abuse of antibiotic medications, posing a potential threat for civilization as more diseases become drug resistant. However, antibiotics are only available with a prescription, and it's no secret they have become harder to receive in the past 10 years due to possibilities such as this. Yet more drug-resistant diseases have been popping up — whooping cough, gonorrhea and TB, just to name a few. Is overprescribing really at fault? Or are there other factors to consider?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Medicaid expansion is the final battle in war over Obamacare
Los Angeles Times
The final battles of any war often are the bloodiest. They're waged by the last holdouts, dead-enders desperate to prove to themselves and their dwindling followers that their efforts were not in vain. The final battle of the war over the Affordable Care Act is being waged over expanding Medicaid.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA-approved device treats sleep apnea in a new way
PBS NewsHour
Loud snoring, sore throats, excessive drowsiness — all common signs of a disorder called sleep apnea that affects an estimated 18 million Americans. For those who've yet to find a treatment that works for them, there may be hope on the horizon: the FDA has approved a sleep apnea "pacemaker" that could change how the condition is managed.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA comes out against aspirin to prevent 1st heart attacks
Forbes
In the latest development in a long-simmering debate, the FDA has announced that aspirin should not be marketed for the prevention of a first heart attack or stroke in people with no history of cardiovascular disease. The announcement follows FDA's rejection of Bayer Healthcare's decade-old petition requesting approval of a primary prevention indication.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Can you turn off your fat genes? (Prevention via Fox News)
Who really pays for healthcare? It might surprise you (USA Today)
New research showing promise in contraceptives for women (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)
Newly approved telehealth guideline causes a stir (Modern Healthcare)
Stem cell therapy to fix the heart: A house of cards about to fall? (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
May 1, 2014
April 24, 2014
April 17, 2014
April 10, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063