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GENOMICS

Genes influence sensitivity to emotions
PsychCentral
It is common knowledge that everyone has a different level of sensitivity to emotional information. Some of us cry at the mere thought of something sad while others remain indifferent even in the gloomiest of circumstances. Similar observations can also be made about the way we emotionally react to happiness and a variety of other emotions.
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Genes influence ADHD course
News-Medical.net
A large twin study shows that genetics have a major influence on whether attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms decrease or persist as children grow older. Furthermore, these genetic influences are mostly separate from those that determine severity of symptoms at baseline, report Jean-Baptiste Pingault and study co-authors.
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Altering genes with the aid of light
R&D Magazine
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. The University of Pittsburgh’s Alexander Deiters just found a way to control the process with higher precision. By using light. Deiters and his group are the first to achieve this. The resulting paper was recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Why personalized medicine may be the future of obesity treatment
Medical Daily
Weight loss is difficult, especially for those who have reached obese levels. But for some, cutting calories may seem to be more difficult than it is for others, and now for the first time, researchers at Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, a branch of the National Institutes of Health can prove it’s true. The study, published in the journal Diabetes, may provide the first insight into what a future with obesity treatments would look like.
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What to expect from the push toward personalized medicine
CBS News
Precision medicine is being called the healthcare of the future. In January, President Barack Obama announced he wants to invest $215 million in research into personalized care, which could lead to medical care tailored to an individual's unique biological makeup. Now, an opinion piece published in The Lancet medical journal argues that new developments in precision medicine could offer enormous gains in the health and life expectancy of millions of Americans.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


New type of stem cell could make it easier to grow human organs
Scientific American
A newly discovered type of stem cell could help provide a model for early human development — and, eventually, allow human organs to be grown in large animals such as pigs or cows for research or therapeutic purposes.
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Scientists regenerate bone tissue using only proteins secreted by stem cells
Medical Xpress
Scientists have discovered a way to regrow bone tissue using the protein signals produced by stem cells. This technology could help treat victims who have experienced major trauma to a limb, like soldiers wounded in combat or casualties of a natural disaster. The new method improves on older therapies by providing a sustainable source for fresh tissue and reducing the risk of tumor formation that can arise with stem cell transplants.
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Dying cells can protect their stem cells from destruction
Phys.org
Cells dying as the result of radiation exposure or chemotherapy can send a warning to nearby stem cells. The chemical signal allows the stem cells to escape the same fate, University of Washington researchers report in the journal Nature Communications.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Apple has plans for your DNA
MIT Technology Review
Of all the rumors ever to swirl around the world’s most valuable company, this may be the first that could involve spitting in a plastic cup. Apple is collaborating with U.S. researchers to help launch apps that would offer some iPhone owners the chance to get their DNA tested, many of them for the first time, according to people familiar with the plans.
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Survey: Many providers want ICD 10 to just go away
By Scott E. Rupp
ICD-10 has been regularly stealing healthcare headlines for about two years and intermittently for years prior. The relevancy of the conversion from ICD-9 is based on the impending deadline, set for Oct. 1. Previous ICD-10 deadlines have been postponed, but federal agencies seem to be focused on sticking to this particular ICD-10 implementation deadline. Even with the deadline approaching, physicians and providers are not close to ready or willing to make the transition to the new medical coding set just yet, or so says the results of a new survey.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


The death of fee-for-service in healthcare
HIT Consultant
On April 16, 2015, President Barack Obama signed into law H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, effectively sentencing fee-for-service to death. The best explanation for how FFS is destroying the nation comes from Charles Munger, vice-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and ad-hoc health luminary, who is equating what American doctors do, to raising rattlesnakes so they can collect the bounty for dead rattlers offered by the government in an effort to combat a growing snake problem.
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CMS touts ACOs, docs need addiction training
MedPage Today
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services gloated over huge savings from its Pioneer accountable care organizations. President Barack Obama looked for allies to help "fast-track" a controversial trade agreement that could impact drug costs. Congress learned doctors need a strategy for helping opioid addicted patients and looked for ways to improve electronic health records.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA questions benefits of Vertex cystic fibrosis treatment
The Boston Globe
Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc.’s new cystic fibrosis therapy, which has sparked high hopes from patients and investors, got a decidedly lukewarm review from the staff working for regulators who will decide whether to approve the drug.
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FDA approves treatment for plague
Pharmacy Times
The FDA today approved Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals' moxifloxacin to treat plague. Avelox is intended to treat pneumonic plague and septicemic plague, and it can also be used to prevent plague among adults. Because cases of plague are rare across the world, the FDA approved Avelox based on a trial with African green monkeys infected with Yersinia pestis, a bacteria that could potentially be used as a bioterrorism agent.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Study: Wealthier Americans are least satisfied by health insurance companies
The HIll
The nation’s wealthiest people are the least likely to be satisfied with their healthcare insurers, with one-third describing their payments as “unaffordable,” according to a new survey. One-quarter of people who make $100,000 or more annually say it's not easy to read their bills and that they're not confident their bills are accurate, according to data from health researchers at PricewaterhouseCoopers.
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How Obamacare changed health insurance ... maybe
Forbes
There’s no debate that Obamacare has expanded health coverage in America — but one big question has been by how many people. And RAND researchers think they’ve got the answer: 16.9 million. Nearly 22.8 million people have gained health insurance since the Affordable Care Act’s first enrollment period kicked off in October 2013, according to RAND’s longitudinal survey, while another 5.9 million lost coverage.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Genius and autism may share genetic link (PBS NewsHour)
Parents may pass on sleepwalking to their kids (TIME)
Some people may have an 'obesity gene' (The Washington Post)
Radiologists are seeing a bigger role in healthcare (Forbes)
The new Botox? FDA approves an injection to fight double chins (The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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