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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Singular gene could increase brain power and fight off dementia
The Huffington Post
The key to fighting off aging and cognitive decline doesn't necessarily come in a pill or a bottle. Instead, researchers say, the key may be a longevity gene that could fight off those "senior moments" and more serious diseases like dementia. A study funded partly by the National Institutes of Health says the KLOTHO gene is responsible for improved thinking, learning and memory processes.
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The genes responsible for deadly prostate cancer discovered
TIME
Treating prostate cancer has always been trickier than most patients anticipate. Unlike other cancers, most prostate tumors are slow-growing and emerge late in life, so the majority of men affected are more likely to die of other causes than their cancer. For up to 15 percent of cases, however, the disease can be fast-moving and life-threatening, and because doctors don't have good ways of separating these aggressive cases from the less dangerous ones, many physicians and patients prefer to err on the side of over-treatment.
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RNA carried by new nanoparticles can silence genes in many organs, could be deployed to treat cancer
Phys.org
RNA interference, a technique that can turn off specific genes inside living cells, holds great potential for treating many diseases caused by malfunctioning genes. However, it has been difficult for scientists to find safe and effective ways to deliver gene-blocking RNA to the correct targets.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Looking to share your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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Researchers 1 step closer to personalized medicine
Counsel & Heal
Researchers at Harvard have merged stem cell and "organ-on-a-chip" technologies to grow functioning human heart tissue carrying an inherited cardiovascular disease. Researchers said the research is a big step forward for personalized medicine as the findings are the working proof that a chunk of tissue containing a patient's genetic disorder can be replicated in the laboratory.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Study questions use of stem cells to repair heart
The Boston Globe
A provocative new study calls into question the rationale for using stem cells to repair the heart — a much-hyped experimental therapy that grew out of insights from a groundbreaking Boston researcher's laboratory. The paper published shows that these stem cells normally generate new cardiac muscle cells at a glacial rate in mice, and the authors said this suggests the stem cells alone would be unlikely to contribute significantly to regeneration of muscle in heart-disease patients.
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New stem cell research points to early indicators of schizophrenia
Medical Xpress
Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early.
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1st stem cell trial for stroke shows lasting benefits
New Scientist
People who received the world's first stem cell treatment for strokes have shown measurable reductions in disability and handicap a year after the injection into their damaged brains. Some can move limbs and manage everyday tasks that were impossible before they received an injection of neural progenitor stem cells, which were clones of cells originally taken from the cortex of a donated fetus.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Healthcare data analytics landscape changing rapidly
FierceHealthIT
Nearly half of healthcare organizations responding to a new survey say they are experiencing a positive return on investment in data analytics and reporting technology. The survey, by TCS Healthcare Technologies in conjunction with the Case Management Society of America and the American Board of Quality Assurance and Utilization Review Physicians, found the landscape changing quickly from similar measures taken in 2008 and 2010.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Singular gene could increase brain power and fight off dementia
The Huffington Post
The key to fighting off aging and cognitive decline doesn't necessarily come in a pill or a bottle.

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Deepak Chopra on how to modify your own genes
The Huffington Post
Physician and best-selling author Deepak Chopra has an empowering message: You can actually modify your own genes through your actions and behaviors.

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Study: Environment as influential as genes in autism
Reuters via Fox News
Environmental factors are more important than previously thought in leading to autism, as big a factor as genes, according to the largest analysis to date to look at how the brain disorder runs in families.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Seasonal allergies: Cough up the dough
By Denise A. Valenti
Spring has sprung, and that means so have seasonal allergies for many folks. An inappropriate immune response to a harmless substance, seasonal allergies generally create quality-of-life concerns without creating major illness. Treatments for seasonal allergies or allergic rhinitis are varied. There are holistic, natural approaches that are available, but most allergy sufferers use antihistamines. The good news is that the cost of combating this annual foe is steadily declining with over-the-counter treatments.
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The health insurance trap
Forbes
Healthcare costs are too damn high — and they're only getting worse. Recently, researchers at Harvard and Dartmouth released a report estimating that healthcare costs will continue to grow faster than the economy for at least the next two decades. This is a tremendous burden on average Americans, who already spend nearly a fifth of their average annual pre-tax income on healthcare.
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Does health insurance increase your lifespan?
USA Today
The mortality rate in Massachusetts declined substantially in the four years after the state enacted a law in 2006 mandating universal healthcare coverage, providing the model for the Affordable Care Act. In a study released, Harvard School of Public Health professors Benjamin Sommers, Sharon Long and Katherine Baicker conclude that "health reform in Massachusetts was associated with a significant decrease in all-cause mortality."
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


US FDA approves 'Star Wars' robotic arm for amputees
Reuters via Fox News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a robotic arm for amputees that is named for the "Star Wars" character Luke Skywalker and can perform multiple, simultaneous movements, a huge advance over the metal hook currently in use. The FDA said it allowed the sale of the DEKA Arm System after reviewing data, including a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs study in which 90 percent of people who used the device were able to perform complex tasks.
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FDA approves Zontivity, Merck heart attack prevention drug, for high-risk patients
Medical Daily
The Food and Drug Administration has announced its approval for the Merck heart attack and stroke prevention drug, Zontivity, for high-risk patients who have never suffered from a number of prior conditions. Zontivity (vorapaxar) tablets are the first in a new class of drug known as protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) antagonists.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FDA-approved device treats sleep apnea in a new way (PBS NewsHour)
Turning medical technology innovation model on its head (USA Today)
The continuing evolution of genes (The New York Times)
Controlling fear by modifying DNA (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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