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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Scientists find more genes tied to alcoholism risk
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
New research pinpoints 11 gene variations that appear to be linked to a higher risk of alcoholism. However, their impact seems to be small in individuals, and the findings may be too limited to be immediately useful in terms of prevention or treatment, an expert said. Still, the results could provide more insight into the mysterious role that genes play in determining why some people drink and don't get addicted while others become alcoholics, the researchers said.
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Genetic match? Why people tend to marry those with similar DNA
LiveScience via CBS News
Going on a first date? The chance that it leads to wedding bells may depend, in part, on how similar his or her DNA is to yours. New research finds that people tend to pick spouses whose genetic profile shares similarities with their own. The effect is subtle (other similarities, such as similarity in education, have a larger influence), but it's important to understand that mating isn't truly genetically random, researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Gene expression profiling weighs heavily in decisions for breast cancer patients yet poorly understood
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Gene expression profiling tests play a critical role when women with early-stage breast cancer decide whether to receive chemotherapy. However, many of the patients do not fully understand what some of the test results mean, new research has suggested.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Patient data-driven personalization key to fixing today's broken health assessments
Wired
On average, we live eight years longer than we did in 1970. The problem is, even though we're living longer than we ever have before, we are not necessarily living healthier. In fact, we are living sicker in the last 10-15 years of life. Modern medicine and medical treatments are prolonging our lives, even helping us live with diseases that were otherwise fatal.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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Is next generation sequencing ready for personalized medicine?
Lexology
Next generation sequencing promises to transform the delivery of healthcare by providing in one test diagnostic and prognostic information that had previously only been available in multiple analyses. One application of the information obtained from NGS is as a companion diagnostic for a therapeutic. A significant reduction in the overall cost to sequence the complete genome, most notably Illumina's announcement of the "$1,000 genome," makes NGS an attractive alternative to current locus-by-locus genetic analysis, and raises the prospect of near-term adoption of NGS in clinical medicine.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cell therapy shows promise for multiple sclerosis
Fox News
For patients with multiple sclerosis, current treatment options only address early-stage symptoms of the debilitating disease. Now, new research has found a potential treatment that could both stop disease progression and repair existing damage. In a study published in Stem Cell Reports, researchers utilized a group of paralyzed mice genetically engineered to have an MS-like condition.
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Proof that cancer stem cells exist?
Medical News Today
There has been much controversy over the compelling idea of cancer stem cells — a small subset of "master cells" that drives the growth and development of a patient's cancer. Now an international team of scientists that tracked the gene mutations driving cancer in patients with a rare blood condition that frequently develops into acute myeloid leukemia, says it has proved conclusively that cancer stem cells exist.
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Why so much fake, unduplicable stem cell research?
Medscape
What is going on in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to stem cell research? We have recently had yet another in a long series of scandals involving claims about the ability to manipulate stem cells in ways that turned out to be utterly untrue and fraudulent. In this case, a scientist in Japan said that she was able to make adult stem cells revert to embryo-like stem cells with some pretty simple chemical exposures. It was announced in leading journals and covered extensively by the media. Then she had to admit that no one could duplicate what she had done and confessed that she had made it up.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Wireless medical implant is smaller than a grain of rice
NBC News
A breakthrough in wireless power has enabled the creation of a tiny medical implant, no larger than a grain of rice, that could be used as a pacemaker or in place of drugs. The Stanford Engineering team behind the new tech was led by Assistant Professor Ada Poon, and the great advance isn't actually the size of the electronic device — it's the way that device is powered.
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Integrating telemedicine and mHealth into the health system
By Jessica Taylor
Many people think futuristic possibilities when they hear about telemedicine and mobile health, but the reality is that both will increase productivity and efficiency throughout the health system in the coming years. At the ATA 2014 Annual Meeting and Trade Show, healthcare colleagues were discussing how the alternative to face-to-face communication — telemedicine — has grown remarkably in the past few years and is continuing to do so.
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FDA clears medical apps from InTouch Health, Gauss Surgical, others
mobihealthnews
Back at the beginning of May, we reported on several mobile health FDA clearances from the previous month. But the FDA has been even busier than that, clearing at least three other big name mobile products in April, and a few more already in May. First off, this month a couple of different iPad apps received FDA clearance.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Scientists find more genes tied to alcoholism risk
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
New research pinpoints 11 gene variations that appear to be linked to a higher risk of alcoholism.

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Singular gene could increase brain power and fight off dementia
The Huffington Post
The key to fighting off aging and cognitive decline doesn't necessarily come in a pill or a bottle.

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The genes responsible for deadly prostate cancer discovered
TIME
Treating prostate cancer has always been trickier than most patients anticipate.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Behind the white coats: Looking at the lifestyles of today's physicians
By Dorothy L. Tengler
When we visit our physicians, we usually don't think about the commitment they made to be able to treat us — four years of medical school, three to seven years of residency, another few years of fellowship. Most likely, physicians have spent seven to 10 years of their lives preparing to practice medicine. But that across-the-board time commitment doesn't make all physicians the same. In fact, a national survey of 125,000 practicing physicians revealed intriguing differences from finances and career plans to personal lifestyles.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Widely used drug no more effective than FDA approved medication in treating epileptic seizures
Medical Xpress
A National Institutes of Health-sponsored study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that lorazepam — a widely used but not yet Food and Drug Administration approved drug for children— is no more effective than an approved benzodiazepine, diazepam, for treating pediatric status epilepticus.
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Seasonal allergy treatments Grastek, Ragwitek approved by FDA
Newsday
As allergy season rages on, two new oral allergy medications were approved this April by the FDA. Grastek and Ragwitek, much like Oralair, offer allergy patients a new alternative to the traditional allergy shot treatments. Less invasive than injections beneath the skin, these medications (taken under the tongue) are a new leg of what's called "immunotherapy," which works by building up an immunity to your trigger allergens.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FDA approves Zontivity, Merck heart attack prevention drug, for high-risk patients (Medical Daily)
Seasonal allergies: Cough up the dough (By Denise A. Valenti)
1st stem cell trial for stroke shows lasting benefits (New Scientist)
RNA carried by new nanoparticles can silence genes in many organs, could be deployed to treat cancer (Phys.org)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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