This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May. 30, 2013

   Home   Mission/Vision    Membership    Corporate Membership    CME/CEU    JMCM    Contact Us

SAVE THE DATE
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Obesity can be inherited, but maternal weight-loss surgery helps
Healthline
Since the 1980s, the worldwide obesity rate has doubled. Across the globe, 40 million children under the age of 5 were overweight or obese in 2011. With more than one-third of American adults classified as obese, it's clear that obesity is no longer a disease affecting the few.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Genetic mutations 'team up' to cause schizophrenia
Bioscience Technology
Using a novel method of analyzing genetic variations in families, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that individually harmless genetic variations affecting related biochemical processes may team up to increase the risk of schizophrenia. They say their findings, reported in Translational Psychiatry, bring some clarity to the murky relationship between genetics and schizophrenia, and may lead to a genetic test that can predict which medications will be effective for individual patients.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


Insurers balk on rarer genetic tests for breast cancer
Kaiser Health News via NPR
When it comes to inherited genetic mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2 get nearly all the attention. Other, rarer genetic mutations that also predispose women to breast cancer. Health insurers that cover BRCA-related testing and treatment without a hitch sometimes balk at providing coverage in these other instances. The predictive value of some of those variations isn't always as strong or clear-cut.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Researchers explore targeted therapies for prostate cancer
The Medical News
Are certain drugs more effective against some types of prostate cancers than others? Researchers know that not all therapies work for all patients — the next question is to figure out how to match the right treatments with the right patients.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "personalized medicine."


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Study: foetal stem cells repair spinal cord injury in rats
Wired
A study has been published showing how injecting foetal neural cells into the damaged spinal cords of rats led to a marked regeneration of the neural pathways.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    'Seismic shift' lifts primary care's impact on hospital revenues (American Medical News)
The curious case of human gene patents (Forbes)
Stem-cell treatment restores sight to blind man (NewScientist)
Genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis found (redOrbit)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: Improvement in survival for patients receiving blood stem cell transplants
Medical Xpress
Survival rates have increased significantly among patients who received blood stem cell transplants from both related and unrelated donors, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology today. The study authors attribute the increase to several factors, including advances in HLA tissue typing, better supportive care and earlier referral for transplantation.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Telerehabilitation system good for assessing low back pain
HealthDay News via Physician's Briefing
A telerehabilitation system may be useful for evaluating chronic low back pain, according to a study published in an issue of Spine. Researchers assessed the level of agreement between chronic low back pain assessments obtained via telerehabilitation and those obtained by face-to-face methods. Participants included 15 individuals who attended a session for a clinical interview followed by two assessments: face-to-face and real-time online telerehabilitation, the order of which was randomly selected.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Hearing aids: A luxury good for many seniors
NPR
More than 30 million Americans experience significant hearing loss, but only a third of them get hearing aids.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Breast cancer genetic testing gets covered by healthcare reform
MyHealthNewsDaily
Genetic testing for breast cancer will be covered under the Affordable Care Act, potentially saving women who need the test thousands of dollars.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
'Seismic shift' lifts primary care's impact on hospital revenues
American Medical News
A survey finding specialists accounting for less revenue to hospitals reflects changes putting more emphasis on primary care as the Affordable Care Act is implemented.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Hearing aids: A luxury good for many seniors
NPR
VideoBriefMore than 30 million Americans experience significant hearing loss, but only a third of them get hearing aids. There are a lot of reasons why someone who needs a hearing aid won't get one: Some think their hearing loss is not that bad, others are too embarrassed to use them, and many people say they are just not worth the price.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Doctors increasingly shut out of hospitals' patient experience efforts
American Medical News
Executives are moving toward committees or dedicated executives, rather than making a point of putting physicians in charge.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Medicare spending variations mostly due to health differences
Kaiser Health News
The idea that uneven Medicare healthcare spending around the country is due to wasteful practices and overtreatment — a concept that influenced the federal health law — takes another hit in a new study. The paper concludes that health differences around the country explain between 75 percent and 85 percent of the cost variations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




High-end health plans scale back to avoid 'Cadillac tax'
The New York Times
Say goodbye to that $500 deductible insurance plan and the $20 co-payment for a doctor's office visit. They are likely to become luxuries of the past. Get ready to enroll in a program to manage your diabetes. Or prepare for a health screening to determine your odds of developing a costly health condition. Expect to have your blood pressure checked or a prescription filled at a clinic at your office, rather than by your private doctor.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


iPhone urinalysis draws 1st FDA inquiry of medical apps
Bloomberg
An iPhone application that lets users check levels of blood, protein and other substances in their urine is the first target of U.S. regulators seeking boundaries in a burgeoning industry for medical diagnosis on-the-go.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
May 23, 2013
May 16, 2013
May 9, 2013
May 2, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063