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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

A massive quest begins to find good genes that protect us from deadly ones
Forbes
What if the best clues to curing genetic illness are not in the disease genes themselves, but in the resilient genes of those who who somehow don't become ill? That's the idea of a new research study launched by open science advocate Stephen Friend president of Sage Bionetworks, along with an article in Science, the research journal, and a TED talk explaining the project.
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Scientists discover how two gene mutations cause melanoma of the eye
Fox News
Researchers have discovered how two genetic mutations can cause the development of melanoma of the eye — the most common form of eye cancer. With a better understanding of how these genes work, the researchers say they now have a promising therapeutic target for treating the disease in the future. In fact, the researchers were even able to slow the progression of eye tumor growth in mice by using an FDA-approved drug associated with these two genetic pathways.
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DNA study links blonde hair to tiny change in genes
The Huffington Post
For all those brunettes wishing they were naturally blond, a small genetic change could have made all the difference. Scientists have found that replacing one of DNA's four letters at a key spot in the genome shifts a particular gene's activity and leads to fairer hair.
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Autism a product of the environment, not genetics, in some children of mothers over 35
Medical Daily
Scientists believe the reason fathers over 40 are more likely to have a child with an autism spectrum disorder is due to gene mutations in their sperm-making cells that gradually accumulate throughout the years. Yet scientists know little about why mothers over the age of 35 face a similar high risk. After exploring different possibilities, researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University discovered environmental influences, not genetics, may cause autism in some children of older mothers.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Obamacare's accountable care organizations are too closed and inefficient
Forbes
It is axiomatic in the technology sector that disruptors fuel the breakneck pace of innovation. These are thinkers and dreamers who look at the established players and the status quo and see, clear as day, that there is a better way. They see a better way of programming thermostats, controlling light switches, listening to music and doing a million other daily tasks, and our lives are infinitely better for it.
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Reform Update: Doctors play major role in ACOs, but surgeons largely left out
Modern Healthcare
Doctors have a sizable role in the governance of the first private and public accountable care organizations, a study says. Surgeons, however, have been largely overlooked for executive committee memberships and in quality measures as Medicare ACOs develop early targets for quality measurement and savings. Two newly published surveys take a closer look at who is running the first crop of ACOs and what their early priorities have been.
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6 ACO types, 6 different ways to transition to value-based care
FierceHealthcare
Accountable care organizations vary widely in terms of ownership, patient care emphasis and organizational structure, according to a new report from Leavitt Partners. The report identified six core types of structurally distinct ACOs, which the research team said can help serve as a resource for policymakers to revise ACO programs and provide direction to vendors to create services and products that will facilitate the transition to value-based care.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Drugmakers find breakthroughs in medicine tailored to individuals' genetic makeups
The Washington Post
When the Food and Drug Administration recently approved a promising new lung cancer drug named Zykadia four months ahead of schedule, it heralded the medication as a "breakthrough" therapy. The drug isn't meant for everyone with the devastating disease, which kills an estimated 160,000 Americans each year. Or even for the majority of patients with its most common form, non-small-cell lung cancer.
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Researchers create experimental blood test that determines BHI by gauging performance of mitochondria
News-Medical.net
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine have created an experimental blood test that, for the first time, determines a "Bioenergetic Health Index," or BHI, by gauging the performance of mitochondria, the cell's energy powerhouses. They report their laboratory findings in a recent issue of the journal Clinical Science.
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Japanese scientist to retract stem cell papers
Phys.org
A Japanese stem cell scientist accused of fabricating research has agreed to retract papers published in the respected journal Nature, an official said. Haruko Obokata, 30, would withdraw two papers at the center of the controversy, according to a spokeswoman for Riken, the respected research institute that sponsored the study, marking a steep fall from grace for the young researcher.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Unlocking the potential of stem cells to repair brain damage
Medical Xpress
A QUT scientist is hoping to unlock the potential of stem cells as a way of repairing neural damage to the brain. Rachel Okolicsanyi, from the Genomics Research Centre at QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, said unlike other cells in the body which were able to divide and replicate, once most types of brain cells died, the damage was deemed irreversible.
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For the 1st time in the lab, researchers see stem cells take key step toward development
Science Codex
The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory. University of Illinois researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Notre Dame University and the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, published their results in the journal Nature Communications.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Seeing is believing: Infographics revolutionizing the patient experience
Forbes
Infographics and visualizations are hugely popular in all cultures, and there is unlimited opportunity to use them in a complex field like healthcare. However, 15 seconds is all the time an online article has to capture a reader according to data from Tony Haile of Chartbeat. The data also suggests that people don't read content on the Web the way we think they do, as much as visualize it.
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The Internet of medical things
Medical Xpress
Each year, more than a million people suffer from medication errors in the United States. In recent years, the spread of barcode-based medication administration systems has cut the rate of errors, but the barcode systems typically require a workstation on wheels that may be clumsy to maneuver through a hospital.
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Doctors are using new medical technology straight out of 'Star Trek' to save lives
PolicyMic
Innovative medical technology is increasingly making our lives resemble Star Trek, and the latest example is a resuscitation technique called suspended animation. This procedure cools down patients' bodies, leaving them in a biological state considered neither dead nor alive. It has the potential to save them from injuries that could otherwise be fatal.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
A massive quest begins to find good genes that protect us from deadly ones
Forbes
What if the best clues to curing genetic illness are not in the disease genes themselves, but in the resilient genes of those who who somehow don't become ill?

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read more
Goodbye root canals? Researchers use lasers to regrow parts of teeth
Fox News
For the millions of Americans who suffer cavities each year, the ominous threat of a root canal may soon be a worry of the past.

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Uncovering clues to the genetic cause of schizophrenia
Medical Xpress
The overall number and nature of mutations — rather than the presence of any single mutation — influences an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia, as well as its severity.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Study questions need for employer healthcare requirement
NPR
When the Affordable Care Act was unveiled, business groups railed against the provision that requires companies with 50 or more employees to provide health insurance for their full-time workers. The Obama administration responded by pushing back the deadline for the coverage, so it hasn't yet taken effect. Now support for this so-called employer mandate is eroding in some surprising quarters.
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Cybersecurity: How to navigate threats in your healthcare organization
By Maria Frisch
The network is down. Someone from accounting just spammed the entire practice. An outsider gains access to protected health information within electronic health records. Someone erases critical operational data. Many of us have both experienced and feared these scenarios, along with other threats to security. In this increasingly digital age, what can healthcare organizations do to protect themselves against cyberthreats?
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA to explore mobile apps in its tech-heavy regulatory roadmap for 2014
FierceBiotechIT
The use of computer-driven approaches from the very first steps in drug discovery through to marketing and the supply chain places the onus on the FDA to understand the technology and how it can help it meet its goals. This is reflected in the list of research areas in which the FDA wants to invest in 2014, which is littered with references to in silico modeling, omics and mobile applications.
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FDA OK's new skin infection treatment by Durata
Reuters via MedCity News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it has approved a new drug to treat acute bacterial skin infections made by Durata Therapeutics Inc. Approval of the drug, Dalvance, follows a positive recommendation by the FDA's advisory committee, which also gave a favorable review to a rival product from Cubist Pharmaceuticals Inc. The FDA is set to rule on the Cubist drug shortly.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Placenta genes 'underpin health differences between girl and boy babies' (Medical News Today)
Researchers identify new genetic building blocks (HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report)
A diagnosis for personalized medicine (strategy+business)
Why telemedicine is the future of healthcare (By Jessica Taylor)
Large healthcare cost increases are built into Obamacare implementation (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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