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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

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Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

4 new genes added to the 'inherited breast cancer' risk list
Medical News Today
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have discovered four new genes that increase breast cancer risk when mutated. The team, who lead an international consortium with the aim of locating more gene mutations that may cause inherited breast cancer susceptibilities, have added RINT1, MRE11A, RAD50 and NBN to the growing list of higher risk genes.
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Search engine for genes will boost medical research
TIME
With the database, researchers will be able to see links between different genes, helping them find better treatments for everything from Alzheimer's to cancer. Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a search engine, called EvoCor, which finds genes that are functionally linked.
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How our genes could make us gay or straight
The Washington Post
The claim that homosexual men share a "gay gene" created a furor in the 1990s. But new research two decades on supports this claim — and adds another candidate gene. To an evolutionary geneticist, the idea that a person's genetic makeup affects their mating preference is unsurprising. We see it in the animal world all the time. There are probably many genes that affect human sexual orientation.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Groups urge Medicare to widen telemedicine options for ACOs
EHR Intelligence
The structure of Medicare reimbursements is limiting the ability of accountable care organizations to engage in telemedicine, say the Alliance for Connected Care and a coalition of other telehealth advocate groups in a series of letters written to newly confirmed HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell.
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Surgeons and surgery are missing components in Medicare ACOs
FierceHealthcare
Although surgeons play a large role in caring for patients under accountable care organization models, Medicare-approved ACOs haven't paid attention to them, according to a new study in Health Affairs. Researchers analyzed the experiences of 59 Medicare-approved ACOs using a survey and conducting in-depth interviews with senior leaders at four Pioneer and Medicare Shared Saving Program models.
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ACO landscape shows docs key to success
HealthcareIT News
To move things forward, shake things up, embrace change, a strong leader proves essential. In healthcare, this leader is often the physician. From getting staff on board with health information technology or adopting new value-based care models, physician leadership is key to success, particularly with accountable care organizations, a new study suggests.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


SAP Hana supports personalized medicine
InformationWeek
Healthcare is becoming more personal — and providers are using analytics, big data and collaboration software to learn more about the care, support and treatment their patients require and want. To deliver on this consumerization of healthcare, providers' employees must have the power and autonomy to query, research and securely access patients' data in their quest for answers.
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Biotech makes personalized cancer vaccines using tumor samples
MIT Technology Review
A highly personalized medical technique is allowing patients with advanced kidney cancer to live nearly three times as long as they normally do. In an experiment involving 21 patients, around half lived more than two and half years after diagnosis with kidney cancer that had begun to spread. Five patients are alive after more than five years.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Researchers make retina from stem cells
NBC News
Researchers have grown part of an eye in a lab dish, using a type of stem cell made from a piece of skin. They said the little retina started growing and developing on its own — an important step towards creating custom-tailored organs in the lab. "We have basically created a miniature human retina in a dish that not only has the architectural organization of the retina but also has the ability to sense light," said M. Valeria Canto-Soler, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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Stem cells show potential for brain damage repair
Medical News Today
A new study suggests a mechanism to get bone marrow stem cells to differentiate into brain cells. If the proposed method proves to be viable, it could lead to ways of generating new brain cell populations for repairing brain damage.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Why Apple wants to help you track your health
MIT Technology Review
With the launch of a health app and data-sharing platform, Apple is betting that tracking your vital signs via smartphone is about to become a booming industry. Interest in phone apps that track nutrition and fitness is growing fast. Meanwhile, clinicians are starting to explore the benefits of using such apps to keep track of patients' health indicators and offer advice.
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Data: Oxygen for interoperability
Government Health IT
It's time to move health data to the front of the line. It gets a lot of lip service, indeed, but there hasn't been enough focus on how information is captured, stored and used to treat patients, nor on how to best use it to conduct research and improve outcomes. In order to drive toward next-generation healthcare, however, "we need to turn our attention to the impact of data integrity and its relationship with health IT," said Allison Viola, vice president of policy and government affairs at the eHealth Initiative.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
4 new genes added to the 'inherited breast cancer' risk list
Medical News Today
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have discovered four new genes that increase breast cancer risk when mutated.

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Autism a product of the environment, not genetics, in some children of mothers over 35
Medical Daily
Scientists believe the reason fathers over 40 are more likely to have a child with an autism spectrum disorder is due to gene mutations in their sperm-making cells that gradually accumulate throughout the years.

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DNA study links blonde hair to tiny change in genes
The Huffington Post
For all those brunettes wishing they were naturally blond, a small genetic change could have made all the difference.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Are prescription monitoring programs merely a placebo?
By Jason Poquette
The network of states connecting their prescription monitoring programs is growing. In a recent press release, the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy announced that 25 states now share controlled substance filling records through the PMP InterConnect program. But while these expansions certainly suggest greater potential for detecting inappropriate controlled substance utilization by patients — particularly across state borders — the question remains about whether these programs are actually accomplishing this.
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How to pay for only the healthcare you want
The New York Times
One reason health insurance is expensive is that most plans cover just about every medical technology — not just the ones that work, or the ones that are worth the price. This not only drives up costs, but also forces many Americans into purchasing coverage for therapies they may not value. But there's no reason things couldn't be different, and better for consumers.
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Administration overhauls federal healthcare website
The Wall Street Journal
The Obama administration is revamping HealthCare.gov and scrapping significant parts of the federal health insurance marketplace in an effort to avoid the problems that plagued the site's launch last fall, according to presentations to health insurers and interviews with government officials and contractors.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Why the FDA needs to approve new sunscreens for Americans
Fox News
New research continues to better define the risks of sunburn and sun exposure. A new prospective study from Brown University, just published in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, is the first to show that experiencing just five blistering sunburns between the ages of 15 and 20 is enough to increase a person's risk of developing melanoma by 80 percent.
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FDA approves hemophilia A drug, Eloctate, for use in stopping bleeding episodes
Medical Daily
The Food and Drug Administration has announced its approval for the hemophilia A drug, Eloctate, for use in treating bleeding episodes, managing bleeding from surgical procedures, and reducing the frequency of future bleeding. Eloctate, a recombinant drug, meaning in this case that it uses a blend of different proteins to achieve its desired effect, also consists of the Coagulation Factor VIII molecule.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A massive quest begins to find good genes that protect us from deadly ones (Forbes)
Scientists discover how two gene mutations cause melanoma of the eye (Fox News)
Obamacare's accountable care organizations are too closed and inefficient (Forbes)
6 ACO types, 6 different ways to transition to value-based care (FierceHealthcare)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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