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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

A patent on your DNA? What the Supreme Court ruling means for you
NBC News
Can someone else patent your genes? The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on that question — a suit filed against Myriad Genetics for its patent on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, which raise the risk of breast, ovarian and certain other cancers. Opponents of patenting human DNA say a ruling in favor of Myriad will mean companies can own your genes, even though experts say it's more complicated than that.
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Genetic switches play big role in human evolution
Phys.Org
A Cornell study offers further proof that the divergence of humans from chimpanzees some 4 million to 6 million years ago was profoundly influenced by mutations to DNA sequences that play roles in turning genes on and off. The study, published June 9 in Nature Genetics, provides evidence for a 40-year-old hypothesis that regulation of genes must play an important role in evolution since there is little difference between humans and chimps in the proteins produced by genes.
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DNA: Definition, structure and discovery
LiveScience
Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA is a molecule that contains the instructions an organism needs to develop, live and reproduce. These instructions are found inside every cell, and are passed down from parents to their children.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "personalized medicine."


Scientists study evolution of breast cancer gene
The Columbus Dispatch
When Angelina Jolie shared her family history of increased risk of breast cancer and her actions because of it, she revealed the power and scope of modern genetic techniques and analysis. In a touching New York Times op-ed piece, Jolie revealed that she inherited a form of the BRCA1 gene associated with elevated risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer.
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'Master protocol' aims to revamp cancer trials
Nature
In the push to match medical therapies to the genetic underpinnings of disease, lung-cancer treatments have been at the frontier. But the 1.6 million people diagnosed with this cancer every year will take scant comfort in knowing that of the past 20 late-stage trials of drugs to treat it, only two yielded positive results.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Mayo Clinic announces first US stem cell clinical trial for children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome
News-Medical.net
Mayo Clinic has announced the first U.S. stem cell clinical trial for pediatric congenital heart disease. The trial aims to determine how stem cells from autologous umbilical cord blood can help children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare defect in which the left side of the heart is critically underdeveloped.
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Making new cartilage from stem cells
R&D
Cartilage injuries have ended many athletes' careers — including that of former two-sport star Bo Jackson — and the general wear-and-tear of the joint-cushioning tissue is something that almost everyone will endure as they age. Unfortunately, repairing cartilage remains difficult: Without blood flowing through it, cartilage has a hard time healing on its own and no chance of regenerating once it's gone.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Allergies and autoimmune disease could share common genetic cause: BACH2 mutations (Medical Daily)
Health plans in the new healthcare exchanges (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
African-American women carry inherited genetic mutations that increase their risk for breast cancer (News-Medical.net)
New wireless electronics could heal wounds and then dissolve (Wired)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Bank your stem cells for future use
Discovery News
Stem cells, the precursors to other kinds of cells in the human body, promise near-miracle medical treatments such as regenerating organs or repairing nerves. But stem cell medicine is still in the early stages. Culturing the right kind of cell remains difficult and so far only a few procedures are FDA-approved.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Robots with your face want to invade workplaces and hospitals
CNNMoney
Robotic telepresence remains one of those technologies that is always lingering just on the horizon; it's going to change everything, the futurists say, just as soon as it gets here. But while several clever telerobotics solutions have come to market in recent years, no solution has yet been both sophisticated and user-friendly enough for the mainstream.
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Surgeons develop app to practice surgery
BBC News
Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practice surgery outside the operating theater. The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices. Dr. Sanjay Purkayastha, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level". The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
A patent on your DNA? What the Supreme Court ruling means for you
NBC News
Can someone else patent your genes? The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on that question — a suit filed against Myriad Genetics for its patent on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, which raise the risk of breast, ovarian and certain other cancers.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Gene sequencing project finds new mutations to blame for a majority of brain tumor subtype
Medical Xpress
Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified mutations responsible for more than half of a subtype of childhood brain tumor that takes a high toll on patients.

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Why your DNA may not be your destiny
LiveScience
Ten years ago, when researchers completed the first map of all the genes of human beings, the immense undertaking promised to revolutionize the field of molecular medicine.

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3-D printing physical bone models
Today's Medical Developments
Time is critical when a patient is undergoing surgery. The longer the patient's internal tissue is exposed, the greater the risk. When a patient can be quickly closed up and begin recovery, chances are greater for a healthy recovery. These concerns are on the minds of maxillofacial surgeons in Belgium, who often need to reconstruct bones in a patient's skull, such as a jaw ravaged by cancer or an eye socket crushed in a car accident.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Healthcare providers speak up for immigrants
USA Today
A man walks into the lobby of Cayce Family Clinic in Nashville — "The rain brought me in!" he cries in mock distress — and the woman behind the counter jokes with him in English. Then another patient approaches her and she switches back to Spanish.
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Healthcare's overlooked cost factor
The New York Times
When the Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Corporation merged its two hospitals with the neighboring Highland Park Hospital just north of Chicago 13 years ago, the deal was presented as an opportunity to increase efficiency and improve the quality of patient care.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves new skin cancer treatments
HealthNewsDigest.com
Advances in the treatment of melanoma are changing the playing field for people who are diagnosed with this most deadly form of skin cancer. Melanoma is the No. 1 cause of death from skin disease. The National Cancer Institute estimates 76,690 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma and 9,480 will die from the disease in 2013.
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Doctors groups OK with FDA Plan B decision
MedPage Today
Physician groups were generally supportive of an FDA decision to expand over-the-counter access to the emergency contraceptive Plan B One-Step without age restrictions. Multiple medical societies cited "overwhelming scientific evidence" of the safety and efficacy of the contraceptive for women of all reproductive ages as the basis of their support.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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