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Click here to view an article on the attempts to solve prescription drug abuse while protecting access for people with pain.

A new Biodesix study highlights VeriStrat’s ability to predict differential treatment outcomes between erlotinib and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Click here to read the press release!

Get up to date information on nutrition and nutrition research from Michael Greger, M.D. at NutritionFacts.org. Click here to view the website!

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Non-Invasive Pre Natal Testing: What Managed Care Needs to Know

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Kids with rare mutations in 2 genes are 4 times more likely to develop severe scoliosis
News-Medical.net
Children with rare mutations in two genes are about four times more likely to develop severe scoliosis than their peers with normal versions of the genes, scientists have found. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified genetic risk factors that predispose children to develop S-shaped curves in their spines that are dramatic enough to require surgery.
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'Good health' genes linked to increased risk of brain cancer
LiveScience
The same gene variants that are linked with having longer caps on chromosome tips and overall good health also may have a downside: They could increase the risk of brain cancer, a new study finds. These new findings may be the first to suggest that people with longer telomeres — the protective stretches of DNA found at the ends of chromosomes — have an increased risk of cancer.
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Newly discovered mechanism could regulate gene activity
Phys.org
Many bacterial species have genes called mraZ and mraW, which are located in a cluster of genes that regulate cell division and cell wall synthesis. Despite the prevalence of these two genes, very little is known about their functions. This study reveals that mraZ and mraW work in opposing ways to control cell growth and division, and that mraZ encodes a transcription factor that binds DNA to potentially regulate the activity of many other genes.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


ACOs, digital health companies petition new HHS secretary to derestrict telehealth
mobihealthnews
After efforts to remove restrictions from CMS coverage of telehealth through legislative channels have stalled, telehealth stakeholders have sent a barrage of open letters to incoming U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell, urging her to use her newfound executive powers to waive the offending restrictions.
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Alternatives to ACO strategies emerge
HealthLeaders Media
While joining an ACO can be the right decision for some physicians practices, the cost savings under this model are still being tested. Some doctors are banding together as independent physician associations, which improves their ability to practice independently, but still nets them better insurer reimbursement rates.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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3 ACO lessons from integrated systems
FierceHealthPlayer
Integrated healthcare systems, with associated providers and health plans, have a leg up on implementing accountable care organizations to improve care and lower costs. Leaders from two Washington-based integrated systems shared some best practices and lessons learned for ACO success during a panel discussion at the AHIP Institute in Seattle.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Big data, my data
iHealthBeat
"The routine operation of modern healthcare systems produces an abundance of electronically stored data on an ongoing basis," Sebastian Schneeweis writes in a recent New England Journal of Medicine Perspective. Is this abundance of data a treasure trove for improving patient care and growing knowledge about effective treatments?
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells derived from different types of fat express different cell-surface markers
Medical Xpress
Mesenchymal stem cells have a natural ability to differentiate into various cell types, such as muscle, cartilage and bone. They can be classified according to their source and include adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells. ASCs, in particular, hold tremendous potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because of their relatively high abundance and ease of isolation.
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Embryonic stem cells offer promising treatment for multiple sclerosis
redOrbit
Scientists in the University of Connecticut's Technology Incubation Program have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease. The researchers demonstrated that the embryonic stem cell therapy significantly reduced MS disease severity in animal models, and offered better treatment results than stem cells derived from human adult bone marrow.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Automated 'lab-on-a-chip' tech could reduce healthcare costs
FierceHealthIT
A new computer programming language, created by a research team at the University of California, Riverside, will automate "laboratory-on-a-chip" technologies — and has the potential to reduce healthcare costs. The technology is used in DNA sequencing, virus detection and drug discovery, among other biomedical applications.
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New technology detects pathogens in soldiers' wounds
Medical Xpress
A biological detection technology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists can detect bacterial pathogens in the wounds of U.S. soldiers that have previously been missed by other technologies. This advance may, in time, allow an improvement in how soldiers' wounds are treated.
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80 percent of providers use the cloud
Health IT Outcomes
HIMSS Analytics published it's first-ever Cloud Survey, which asked 150 healthcare organizations how they use the cloud and what they planned on using in the future. An overwhelming 80 percent of respondents indicated they already use cloud-based services, and the survey further found almost all providers plan to expand that use.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Kids with rare mutations in 2 genes are 4 times more likely to develop severe scoliosis
News-Medical.net
Children with rare mutations in two genes are about four times more likely to develop severe scoliosis than their peers with normal versions of the genes, scientists have found.

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4 new genes added to the 'inherited breast cancer' risk list
Medical News Today
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have discovered four new genes that increase breast cancer risk when mutated.

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How our genes could make us gay or straight
The Washington Post
The claim that homosexual men share a "gay gene" created a furor in the 1990s. But new research two decades on supports this claim — and adds another candidate gene.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


ICD-10: Everything you need to know
By Maria Frisch
The compliance deadline for ICD-10 is Oct. 1, 2015 — a change expected to impact all HIPAA-covered entities. While this rollout will entail both time and cost burdens throughout healthcare, the move from ICD-9 to ICD-10 reflects significant advances in medicine that have occurred during the last three decades. Implementation of ICD-10 is not optional, and rollouts will be complex. This article highlights some important facts and resources regarding the transition to ICD-10.
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Thousands to be questioned on eligibility for health insurance subsidies
The New York Times
The Obama administration is contacting hundreds of thousands of people with subsidized health insurance to resolve questions about their eligibility, as consumer advocates express concern that many will be required to repay some or all of the subsidies. Of the 8 million people who signed up for private health plans through insurance exchanges under the new healthcare law, 2 million reported personal information that differed from data in government records, according to federal officials and Serco, the company hired to resolve such inconsistencies.
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Does social media have a place in healthcare?
By Joan Spitrey
Just like many of you, I have been on the Facebook bandwagon for quite some time. I have really enjoyed it as I have lived all over the country, and it has been a great way to keep up with old friends. But does it have a place in a healthcare career or profession? As I have extended my reach into the big, wide Web, I have come to realize there are a lot of outlets for sharing and getting information. However, just like anything in life, there are certainly pros and cons to these new-found resources.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA delays decision on latest weight loss pill
USA Today
Consumers awaiting the latest weight loss pill will have to wait at least three more months. The Food and Drug Administration has delayed a decision that was expected on the prescription medication Contrave, drugmaker Orexigen Therapeutics Inc. announced.
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FDA approve Lymphoseek to evaluate head and neck cancer
Medical News Today
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration have given the OK for doctors to use Lymphoseek — a radioactive diagnostic imaging agent — to evaluate the spread of squamous cell carcinoma in the body's head and neck region.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Search engine for genes will boost medical research (TIME)
Why the FDA needs to approve new sunscreens for Americans (Fox News)
How to pay for only the healthcare you want (The New York Times)
Groups urge Medicare to widen telemedicine options for ACOs (EHR Intelligence)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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