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SAVE THE DATE
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Our genes, their secrets
The New York Times
The Supreme Court's unanimous ruling, barring patents on human genes, was a wise and balanced decision that clears away a major barrier to innovation in the areas of biotechnology, drug development and medical diagnostics. But the decision is just a first step toward finding the right balance between protecting legitimate intellectual property and securing an open future for personalized medicine.
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Study: No danger of cancer through gene therapy virus
ScienceDaily
In fall 2012, the European Medicines Agency approved the modified adeno-associated virus AAV-LPL S447X as the first ever gene therapy for clinical use in the Western world. UniQure, a Dutch biotech company, had developed AAV-LPL S447X for the treatment of a rare inherited metabolic disease called lipoprotein lipase deficiency which affects approximately one or two out of one million people. The disease causes severe, life-threatening inflammations of the pancreas.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform, Inspire and Empower
Visit IntheFaceofPain.com and download the Handbook for People with Pain, a resource to help you or a loved one who suffers with pain.

IntheFaceofPain.com is a pain advocacy resource that provides pain-related news, downloadable materials and actionable tools for people with pain, health care professionals, caregivers and other concerned individuals.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Massive cancer database to focus on personalized medicine
FierceHealthIT
England is launching an extensive cancer database tracking all 350,000 new tumors detected each year as well as 11 million historical records going back as far as 30 years, in an attempt to advance personalized medicine. Jem Rashbass, national director of disease registration at Public Health England, said it would be "the most comprehensive, detailed and rich clinical dataset on cancer patients anywhere in the world."
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "personalized medicine."


Developing drugs for rare diseases
The New York Times
"An Experimental Drug's Bitter End" is but one example of many of what is wrong with the drug industry's research and development model. Clinical trials include hundreds of patients with a disease that may manifest differently in each. While sheer participant number provides statistical strength, it hides the positive effects of drugs on some patients.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cell discovery could help regrow fingers
Live Science via Discovery News
Mammals can regenerate the very tips of their fingers and toes after amputation, and now new research shows how stem cells in the nail play a role in that process. A study in mice, detailed in the journal Nature, reveals the chemical signal that triggers stem cells to develop into new nail tissue, and also attracts nerves that promote nail and bone regeneration.
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Biomaterials offer a robust platform for stem cells
Forbes
One of the challenges facing stem cell researchers is how to ensure that cells delivered to patients don't die after transplantation to the point of care. At a session of the annual ISSCR in Boston, Molly S. Shoichet of University of Toronto presented some findings from her lab's latest research.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    'Master protocol' aims to revamp cancer trials (Nature)
Robots with your face want to invade workplaces and hospitals (CNNMoney)
Scientists study evolution of breast cancer gene (The Columbus Dispatch)
Healthcare's overlooked cost factor (The New York Times)
Mayo Clinic announces first US stem cell clinical trial for children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (News-Medical.net)
FDA approves new skin cancer treatments (HealthNewsDigest.com)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Robotic surgeries on the rise, but are there risks?
NBC News
VideoBriefThe majority of the hundreds of thousands of robotic surgeries performed in the U.S. each year are done safely. However, as use of the machine increases, so are reports of injuries: The U.S. Food and Drug administration has received more than 200 reports since 2007 of burns, cuts and infections – including 89 deaths – after robotic surgery. Rock Center’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman investigates Intuitive Surgical Systems and meets a woman who blames her devastating complication on the robot.
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Sticky fix: Surgeons using 'super glue' to mend brains
NBC News
Doctors at the University of Kansas Hospital use super glue to treat an infant suffering from a hemorrhaging brain aneurysm. KSHB’s Jadiann Thompson reports. A 3-week-old girl was recovering from life-saving brain surgery after Kansas surgeons used a sterile surgical glue to seal the infant's bleeding aneurysm. The baby, Ashlyn Julian, has shown no complications from the June 5 procedure at The University of Kansas Hospital in Kansas City, Kan., and is expected to head home following another week or so of monitoring, said Bob Hallinan, hospital spokesman.
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Telemedicine patients more likely urban, educated
FierceHealthIT
Urbanites are twice as likely as those in rural areas to take part in telemedicine, though participation rates for both remain low, according to a report on broadband use released by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. Based on data from 53,000 households collected by the Census Bureau in July 2011, the report found 8 percent of urban Internet users took part in telemedicine initiatives, compared with 4 percent in rural areas.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Our genes, their secrets
The New York Times
The Supreme Court's unanimous ruling, barring patents on human genes, was a wise and balanced decision that clears away a major barrier to innovation in the areas of biotechnology, drug development and medical diagnostics.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Making new cartilage from stem cells
R&D
Cartilage injuries have ended many athletes' careers — including that of former two-sport star Bo Jackson — and the general wear-and-tear of the joint-cushioning tissue is something that almost everyone will endure as they age.

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A patent on your DNA? What the Supreme Court ruling means for you
NBC News
Can someone else patent your genes? The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on that question — a suit filed against Myriad Genetics for its patent on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, which raise the risk of breast, ovarian and certain other cancers.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Healthcare inflation slowing down
Medical News Today
Despite newly insured people being added to the system, American healthcare inflation is expected to fall to 6.5 percent in 2014, says a new report by the Health Research Institute, part of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. Healthcare inflation in 2014 will drop even lower than this year "Defying historical patterns," the authors wrote.
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Are slower-growing healthcare costs temporary or permanent?
The Washington Post
It's one of the hottest debates in healthcare: Is the historically slow growth in health spending in recent years due to the lingering effects of the recession, or is it a fundamental change that augurs well for the future? The implications are huge — if policymakers think the slowdown is only temporary, they might try to take steps to cut Medicare spending further, for example; if they think the improvement is permanent, they might cross their fingers and hope for the best.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


NanoKnife electrocution prostate cancer treatment gets FDA nod to begin testing
Medical Daily
We're all familiar with the various treatments for cancer — chemotherapy, radiation therapy, pharmaceuticals and cryotherapy, but now we may have another option: electroshock therapy. AngioDynamics, a medical device maker, has just received Investigational Device Exemption approval from the Food and Drug Administration to begin testing its NanoKnife. The device sends electrical pulses into prostate cancer cells, and aims to have far fewer side effects than other therapies.
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FDA urges protection of medical devices from cyber threats
Reuters
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration urged medical device makers and medical facilities to upgrade security protections to protect against potential cyber threats that could compromise the devices or patient privacy. It released that advisory in coordination with a separate alert from the Department of Homeland Security, which disclosed vulnerability in a wide variety of medical equipment that can make those devices vulnerable to remote attacks from hackers.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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