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Check out JMCM’s new website at www.jmcmpub.org

We wanted you to be aware that the FDA has granted accelerated approval of IBRANCE® (palbociclib) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with ER+/HER2- advanced breast cancer. Click here to see the press release!

Otezla® (apremilast) is approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. Please click here for more information.

OAs part of APhA's longstanding and ongoing commitment to helping its members ensure optimal and safe patient use of prescription medications, nonprescription products, and dietary supplements, APhA convened national pharmacy and medicine leaders and other stakeholders on March 26. Click here for more information .

 

Fall Managed Care Forum: Register today!
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Register today for the 2015 Fall Forum being held November 12-13, 2015 at The Bellagio in Las Vegas. Click here to visit the conference website.
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GENOMICS


Genes add risk to depression
Medical Xpress
People born with a particular gene variant have a greater risk of developing depressions, a recent study from the Department of Psychology at The University of Oslo shows. Slowly, our society has begun to realize that depression is a serious public health problem.
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Top athletes don't share a single talent gene, but hundreds of them
Medical Xpress
When this year's Wimbledon tennis championship begins on June 29, British hopes will again be pinned on Andy Murray. Only time will tell if he can kick on from his Queen's Club victory and win the U.K.'s premier tennis tournament for a second time. But why is he so good at the sport? Is it his training regime? Is it the care and attention that he pays to his diet? Is it the team that advises him on training, technique and strategy for each match?
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SPONSORED CONTENT


If you hate cilantro, blame it on your genes
Fox News
Have you ever wondered why the refreshing, slightly peppery taste of cilantro can be more like a mouthful of soap to your dining partner? People who claim they hate cilantro aren’t just being picky. Whether or not you like the herb comes down to genetics.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


The future of healthcare could be in concierge medicine
Healthline
Concierge medicine allows doctors to charge a flat monthly fee for services. It’s an idea that finally might be catching on. Kurt Mosley was speaking to a group of physicians when the subject of concierge medicine came up. He asked one of the doctors what they charge their patients for this type of guaranteed care.
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Human 'organs-on-chips' could accelerate personalized medicine, eliminate animal testing
Genetic Literacy Project
Tiny tubes emerge from a small transparent block, pumping imperceptible amounts of fluid and air to and fro. It looks like a Fox’s Glacier Mint has been plugged into a life support machine, but this humble chunk of see-through silicone is a model organ that could revolutionize the pharmaceutical industry, reducing the need for animal testing and speeding up the development of new drugs.
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Depersonalized medicine shows promising results against cancer
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Researchers at St. Louis University say they have, for the first time, found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit. Unlike recent advances in personalized medicine that focus on specific genetic mutations associated with different types of cancer, this research targets a broad principle that applies to almost every kind of cancer: Its energy source.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


UCLA study reveals bone-building protein's impact on bone stem cells
Health Canal
A new study by UCLA researchers shows that administering the protein NELL-1 intravenously stimulates significant bone formation through the regenerative ability of stem cells. These preclinical results could one day have an impact on the development of a treatment for osteoporosis, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide, as well as potentially help those with traumatic bone injuries, such as members of the military or even astronauts who lose bone density while in space.
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New stem cell research uncovers causes of spinal muscular atrophy
Medical Xpress
New research from the Advanced Gene and Cell Therapy Lab at Royal Holloway, University of London has used pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand why certain cells are more at risk of degenerating in spinal muscular atrophy than others. Spinal muscular atrophy is a devastating hereditary disease and is the biggest genetic killer in infancy.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Why connected medicine is becoming vital to healthcare
The Wall Street Journal
If any one word defines where healthcare is heading, it’s this: connectivity. It’s a catch-all term that essentially means using the Web to increase medicine’s reach beyond the confines of the doctor’s office and the hospital. By using remote patient monitoring and telemedicine consultations, for instance, specialists can provide virtual care for distant patients. Meanwhile, all sorts of devices, including smartphones, can send health messages and track patients’ adherence to medication and exercise regimens.
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Tablets and portals may not be a hit, but wearables show promise
By Scott E. Rupp
It seems patient engagement efforts may require more work if the latest survey holds true. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, giving patients access to portals and tablets "does not have a great impact on their understanding of their care and treatment." The hypothesis was that tablets and apps would result in greater knowledge of team members' names and roles, planned tests and procedures, medications and higher patient activation.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


A promising Medicare plan, if only health organizations would stick around
The New York Times
Two recent studies of Medicare’s new way to pay for healthcare show that it’s reducing spending and improving quality. The problem is, healthcare organizations don’t always stick with the program. Both studies examined Medicare’s 32 Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations.
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CMS loosens rules for rural ACOs seeking upfront financial help
Modern Healthcare
The CMS is making it easier for rural healthcare providers and small physician groups to participate in Medicare accountable care organizations. The changes are being made to the ACO Investment Model, which provides loans to rural and underserved communities that would otherwise lack the capital to participate in the ACO program.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Little hope for Americans with rare diseases
Newsweek
Approximately 30 million people in the U.S. and 350 million people worldwide are living with conditions so rare they are understudied, untreated and, in some cases, even unrecognized. In the U.S., a disease is considered rare if it afflicts fewer than 200,000 patients, and there are an estimated 7,000 rare diseases, many of which are hereditary and caused by genetic mutations.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriage expected to boost health coverage
NPR
The right to marry in any state won't be the only gain for gay couples from last week's Supreme Court ruling. The decision will likely boost health insurance among gay couples as same-sex spouses get access to employer plans. The logic is simple. Fewer than half of employers that offer health benefits make the insurance available to same-sex partners who aren't married. Virtually all of them offer coverage to spouses.
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Insurance subsidies remain, but so do health law questions
The New York Times
The Affordable Care Act, saved by the Supreme Court for the second time in three years, has changed the fabric of healthcare in America, providing treatment and coverage to millions of the uninsured while transforming the insurance and hospital industries. But the law still faces stiff political resistance in many quarters and could yet return as an explosive issue in the 2016 elections.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists find a gene that regulates sleep (TIME)
FDA approve device that helps blind 'see with tongue' (Medical News Today)
Slow going on ACO risk (HealthLeaders Media)
Stem cells show promise as treatment for diabetic neuropathy (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News)
Tool to analyze genes according to their evolutionary profiles (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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