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Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Exercise can have an effect at DNA level against fat cells
Medical News Today
A zebra can't change its stripes, but according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden, we can change our DNA. We just have to get on the treadmill more often. The study, published online in PLOS Genetics, followed 23 men during 6 months, all of whom were slightly overweight but relatively healthy. Though they were not involved in any physical activity before the study, the men were instructed to attend three spinning or aerobics classes each week.
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Genes may reveal when aspirin won't reduce heart risk
NPR
People are often told to take low-dose aspirin to reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke. But that preventive remedy doesn't work for a lot of people. Researchers say they've found genetic variations that might be used to identify people who don't respond well to aspirin. If the results prove out, there could soon be a blood test to tell who benefits from aspirin, and who needs to look for other treatments to reduce cardiovascular risk.
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Advanced genetics technologies may help predict patient outcomes in people with ALL
News-Medical.net
New evidence suggests that using advanced genetics technologies to monitor for remaining cancer cells after treatment may soon become an effective tool to inform treatment decisions and ultimately predict patient outcomes for patients with a particularly aggressive form of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Study results were published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


The future of biotechnology in medicine
Healthcare Global
The use of biotechnology in medicine is revolutionizing the diagnosis of diseases caused by genetic factors. New tests can detect changes in the DNA sequence of genes associated with disease risk and can predict the likelihood that a patient will develop a disease. While this monumental healthcare shift is in its early stages, new medicine, diagnostics and technologies are being developed that can hold great potential to improve patients' lives. One of these technologies is human genome.
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Future of healthcare is personalized medicine
Diplomatic Courier
It is a common refrain that America has the best healthcare in the world, but our people are far from the healthiest. We spend twice as much as any other nation on health services, yet rank dismally, behind more than twenty other countries in basic health metrics like infant mortality and life expectancy. We have more MRI machines, heart transplants, new drug patents, Nobel Prize winners than any country in the world, and yet people in Greece, Israel and Jordan live longer. How can this be?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "personalized medicine."


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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Researchers create the inner ear from stem cells, opening potential for new treatments
Medical Xpress
A research team led by Eri Hashino, Ph.D., Ruth C. Holton Professor of Otolaryngology at Indiana University School of Medicine, reported that by using a three-dimensional cell culture method, they were able to coax stem cells to develop into inner-ear sensory epithelia — containing hair cells, supporting cells and neurons — that detect sound, head movements and gravity.
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1st child to receive windpipe grown from own stem cells dies
Reuters
Two-year-old Hannah Warren, the first child to receive a windpipe grown from her own stem cells, has died three months after a rare operation, the Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, Ill., said. The child was diagnosed with an uncommon congenital abnormality known as tracheal agenesis, which means her windpipe failed to develop.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Combination of evidence-based medicine and personalized medicine can result in optimal healthcare (New-Medical.net)
How biotechs got hot (The Wall Street Journal)
6 apps to get a doctor's advice (ITworld)
Why healthcare costs are about to explode (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Cybersecurity for medical devices
By Rosemary Sparacio
The issue of cybersecurity in the medical and healthcare field was first discussed when it was still in its infancy in 2005. Since then, technological advances have required the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and others to be much more proactive and involved in the process. And this process must include everyone: the FDA, the medical device manufacturers, the IT users who are mostly in hospitals and doctor's offices, and the independent IT providers, such as the IBMs, Microsofts and Ciscos of the world, among a whole host of others.
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3-D printed human organs prep doctors for real surgeries
Mashable
An Iowa businessman says 3-D-printed human organs can help doctors practice surgeries before actually opening up a real body. Mark Ginsberg — an Iowa City jewelry store owner, who also has a manufacturing facility with a couple of 3-D printers — has partnered with physicians to help 3-D print organ models or whatever they might need, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Exercise can have an effect at DNA level against fat cells
Medical News Today
A zebra can't change its stripes, but according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden, we can change our DNA. We just have to get on the treadmill more often.

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Observing live gene expression in the body
ScienceDaily
Most of our physiological functions fluctuate throughout the day. They are coordinated by a central clock in the brain and by local oscillators, present in virtually every cell.

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5 reasons not to do genetic testing
Medscape
There can be little doubt that the future of medicine, the next penicillin if you will, is genomics. Why wouldn't it be? The double helix forms the foundation of biology. Already, great strides have been made.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Walgreens, Blue Cross team up for healthcare reform outreach
Chicago Tribune
With open enrollment for health insurance less than three months away, the nation's largest drug store chain and one of the country's largest insurance groups launched a national educational campaign on the healthcare overhaul law in an effort to bring consumers up to speed on the coverage they'll soon be required to carry.
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Is this the end of health insurers?
The Washington Post
In 2012, MedStar Health, like many large employers, struggled to keep up with rapidly rising healthcare costs. For three years, the company held down premiums for its 19,000 employees by absorbing the increases itself. Most employers would have had no choice but to raise premiums — in this case, by about $550 for a family — and cope with frustrated employees. MedStar, one of the Washington area's largest health systems, saw another option.
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ACOs increasingly turn to remote patient monitoring
FierceHealthIT
More than half of accountable care organizations that responded to a recent survey from Menlo Park, Calif.-based Spyglass Consulting Group are using remote patient monitoring to manage high-risk chronically ill patients. Most of the hospitals and health systems interviewed are or were in the process of becoming ACOs.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA moves to allow updates of generic drug warnings
Medill News Service via USA Today
The Food and Drug Administration announced plans to give generic drug manufacturers permission to change safety labels on drugs when new information about potential risks is discovered. This comes after years of petitioning from consumer watchdog groups such as Public Citizen, which issued a report calling on the FDA to make it easier for generic drugmakers to update safety labeling.
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FDA approves Orexo drug to treat opioid addiction
Reuters
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Swedish drugmaker Orexo AB's drug to treat opioid addiction, the company said, sending its shares up as much as 14.3 percent in Stockholm. The tablet, Zubsolv, dissolves under the tongue. It combines the drugs buprenorphine and naloxone and will compete with similar products, Subutex and Suboxone, made by Britain's Reckitt-Benckiser Group Plc.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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