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Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Vast cancer genetics database could aid drug discovery
Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., announced that they had assembled the world's largest database of cancer-related genetic variations — the data will be available for researchers to plumb as they work to understand how genetics and cancer are related — and what medications work best to fight different cancers.
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Whole genome testing may soon replace genetic testing, but how effective is it?
Medical Daily
Illnesses arise as a result of heredity and environment. The environment can sometimes alter our genetic information, and this genetic information can ultimately undergo minor or major changes, causing diseases and disorders. It is useful, then, for doctors to utilize genetic testing in order to test for specific ailments, such as cancer, especially if a patient shows potential symptoms or has a family history of the disease.
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How patients experience direct-to-consumer genetic testing
ScienceDaily
Several companies sell genetic testing directly to consumers, but little research has been done on how consumers experience such tests. The tests have raised questions about the validity and accuracy of the information provided to consumers — especially without the involvement of a qualified healthcare professional.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Prognosis: Healthy earnings for pharma, biotech
CNBC
Pharmaceutical and biotech stocks have handsomely outperformed markets this year, and with Johnson & Johnson's second-quarter earnings beat, investors may hope earnings will push stocks even higher. However, the actual results for many large-cap pharma companies — such as Novartis, Pfizer, Merck and Eli Lilly — are unlikely to inspire as they wade through the tail end of patent cliffs, and fight against currency headwinds. As a result, news on the pipelines will be where investors will focus their attention.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Advisers handle hot biotech stocks with care
The Wall Street Journal
Biotechnology stock funds are staging a robust rebound from last month's retreat, leading more advisers to dip their toes back into one of 2013's hottest markets. In such a wide-ranging sector, however, portfolio managers are acting with special care. Some are taking precautions against a pullback, and see signs that, after a multiyear-run, bigger may no longer be better.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Blood vessel network successfully created from stem cells
Medical New Today
Scientists have created blood vessels in mice using human stems cells, leading to potential new treatments for cardiovascular disease, according to research published in PNAS Early Edition. The researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital extracted vascular precursor cells derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells — reprogrammed adult cells similar to embryonic stem cells — from one group of healthy adults, and from another group with type 1 diabetes.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Stem cells directed using magnets
Bioscience Technology
Magnets could be a tool for directing stem cells' healing powers to treat conditions such as heart disease or vascular disease. By feeding stem cells tiny particles made of magnetized iron oxide, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech can then use magnets to attract the cells to a particular location in a mouse's body after intravenous injection.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Future of healthcare is personalized medicine (Diplomatic Courier)
Is this the end of health insurers? (The Washington Post)
Researchers create the inner ear from stem cells, opening potential for new treatments (Medical Xpress)
Genes may reveal when aspirin won't reduce heart risk (NPR)
The future of biotechnology in medicine (Healthcare Global)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Smart wearable sensors and their growing applications in today's healthcare industry
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
The aging U.S. population affected by chronic conditions and the skyrocking healthcare costs forces the U.S. healthcare system to face daunting challenges. There have been many contributing factors in this issue, which are outside of the realm of this article. However, how we will be able to provide quality care to an increasing number of individuals with complex chronic medical conditions and maximize their independence and participation, remains to be an ongoing challenge. One possible way that comes to mind could be to leverage the advances in information technology in micro- and nanotechnologies, sensor miniaturization, smart fabrics as well as remote monitoring in order to increase the independency of an aging population with various degrees of disabilities without letting it become a burden to the healthcare industry.
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Study: Telemedicine services led to jump in hospital revenue
iHealthBeat
Hospitals that leverage telemedicine and referred patients to children's facilities experienced a significant boost in revenue, according to a study. Researchers from University of California-Davis Children's Hospital examined billing information from July 2003 to December 2010 for patients transferred from 16 hospitals that used telemedicine to nearby children's facilities.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Smart wearable sensors and their growing applications in today's healthcare industry
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
The aging U.S. population affected by chronic conditions and the skyrocking healthcare costs forces the U.S. healthcare system to face daunting challenges.

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1st child to receive windpipe grown from own stem cells dies
Reuters
Two-year-old Hannah Warren, the first child to receive a windpipe grown from her own stem cells, has died three months after a rare operation, the Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, Ill., said.

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Exercise can have an effect at DNA level against fat cells
Medical News Today
A zebra can't change its stripes, but according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden, we can change our DNA. We just have to get on the treadmill more often.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Healthcare law may close gaps in mental health coverage
Los Angeles Times
A disjointed financing system for mental health services in California has led to gaps in care, but the national healthcare law is expected to help close some of those holes, according to new research by the California HealthCare Foundation. Half of the state's adults and two-thirds of the adolescents with mental health issues aren't receiving treatment, according to the study.
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A new age for healthcare kiosks — 5 ways next generation kiosks disrupt medicine and healthcare marketing
Forbes
Healthcare kiosks call to mind the dusty automated blood pressure machines that have sat quietly in drug stores for years. But the new generation of these devices offers a radically different experience — one that can have a big impact on the practice of medicine and healthcare marketing — if companies don't drop the ball.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA approves Boehringer's Gilotrif drug for late-stage lung cancer patients with specific mutation
Medical Daily
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a pharmaceutical drug, Gilotrif, from Boehringer Ingelheim for late-stage, non-small cell lung cancer patients with a specific mutation. The FDA has also approved a companion genetic test to determine which patients would respond to the treatment.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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