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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Scientists identify genetic basis of allergies: Treatments could soon target genes, not symptoms
Medical Daily
Allergies plague people of all ages for at least six months of each year. Often, little can be done to treat allergies, and instead people take steps to soothe symptoms. However, a new study identifies a fault in one's genetic code that can lead to allergic reactions. Allergic diseases tend to run in families, or be inherited, but specific genes and pathways that drive these disorders have not yet been identified. Identification of common diseases and disorders as having a genetic basis is often promising.
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Scientists control genes with light: New method for understanding function
Science World Report
Genes make up the roadmaps of our bodies, revealing exactly how we function. Controlling these genes could allow us to learn more about them, possibly revealing new insight into diseases. Now, researchers may have a way to do so. Scientists have developed a technique that can rapidly or halt the expression of any gene of interest simply by shining light on the cells.
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Alzheimer's risk gene tracked in search for new therapies
Bloomberg
Scientists mapped the step-by-step actions that lead to late-onset Alzheimer's disease, research that may offer new paths to developing treatments for the ailment. People who carried the APOE4 gene, known to increase the risk of acquiring Alzheimer's later in life, without having the disease, experienced changes in the expression of genes in their brains that resembled those of Alzheimer's patients, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
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Genetic testing improved student learning in personalized medicine class
ScienceDaily
Students who had their genome tested as part of a groundbreaking medical school course on personalized medicine improved their knowledge of the class materials by an average of 31 percent compared with those who didn't undergo the testing, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Top 5 pathways to personalized medicine
Healthcare IT News
If there's one thing everyone in healthcare can probably agree on right now, it's that there is an awful lot of data being generated each and every day. What to do with that data, however, is another question. As Ted Driscoll, digital health director at venture capital firm Claremont Creek Ventures, sees it, the explosion of data is a definite boon for personalized medicine.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells reprogrammed using chemicals alone
Scientific American
Scientists have demonstrated a new way to reprogram adult tissue to become cells as versatile as embryonic stem cells — without the addition of extra genes that could increase the risk of dangerous mutations or cancer. Researchers have been striving to achieve this since 2006, when the creation of so-called induced pluripotent cells was first reported.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Stem cells help blind mice see
AFP via Discovery News
Blind mice have been able to see once more in a laboratory exploit that marks a further boost for the fast-moving field of retinal therapy, according to a study published. Scientists in Britain used stem cells and early-stage, highly versatile cells — taken from mice embryos, and cultured them in a lab dish so that they differentiated into immature photoreceptors, the light-catching cells in the retina.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How patients experience direct-to-consumer genetic testing (ScienceDaily)
A new age for healthcare kiosks — 5 ways next generation kiosks disrupt medicine and healthcare marketing (Forbes)
Smart wearable sensors and their growing applications in today's healthcare industry (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)
Prognosis: Healthy earnings for pharma, biotech (CNBC)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Researchers create surgical knife that can detect cancer tissue
MedCity News
Scientists have created an "intelligent" surgical knife that can detect in seconds whether tissue being cut is cancerous, promising more effective and accurate surgery in future. The device, built by researchers at London's Imperial College, could allow doctors to cut back on additional operations to remove further pieces of cancerous tumors.
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Anatomy expert is creating digital models to train surgical students
Medical Xpress
An anatomy expert at Iowa State University is developing digital tools that could help surgical students gain nearly lifelike experience with a scalpel without having to cut into cadavers or living subjects. Diana Peterson, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences in ISU's College of Veterinary Medicine, has high hopes for a project that could lead to realistic surgical training in a virtual world.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Scientists identify genetic basis of allergies: treatments could soon target genes, not symptoms
Medical Daily
Allergies plague people of all ages for at least six months of each year. Often, little can be done to treat allergies, and instead people take steps to soothe symptoms. However, a new study identifies a fault in one's genetic code that can lead to allergic reactions.

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read more
Vast cancer genetics database could aid drug discovery
Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., announced that they had assembled the world's largest database of cancer-related genetic variations — the data will be available for researchers to plumb as they work to understand how genetics and cancer are related — and what medications work best to fight different cancers.

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Whole genome testing may soon replace genetic testing, but how effective is it?
Medical Daily
Illnesses arise as a result of heredity and environment. The environment can sometimes alter our genetic information, and this genetic information can ultimately undergo minor or major changes, causing diseases and disorders.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Better healthcare for less money, if you can find it
Reuters
Consumers intrigued by the new model of accountable healthcare — which promises better-coordinated care that could savea lot of money — are going to have to actively seek out participating providers. A tenet of accountable care is better quality: Doctors are paid to keep patients healthy, rather than for treating them when they are sick. Some programs even penalize providers for too many hospitalizations or not keeping overall costs down.
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Are doctors passing the buck on healthcare costs?
Los Angeles Times
Physicians are concerned about skyrocketing healthcare costs — but most don't think they have "major responsibility" for reducing those costs, according to survey results released. Mayo Clinic researcher Dr. Jon C. Tilburt and colleagues polled 2,556 doctors on healthcare costs in 2012, asking them to gauge their level of responsibility for controlling costs — as well as others' responsibility.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA moves against alternative diabetes treatments
The Wall Street Journal
The Food and Drug Administration is acting to stop U.S. sales of nearly two dozen products marketed as diabetes treatments that the agency said are illegal and can be ineffective, counterfeit or in some cases dangerous. The federal agency sent warning letters to the companies involved and said it could follow up by seizing the products, enjoining their sale and even criminally prosecuting firms whose officials fail to take corrective action.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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