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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will be held November, 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.
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GENOMICS


Child abuse impacts how children's genes are activated
Science World Report
Child abuse may not just impact a person emotionally; it may also influence their genes. Scientists have found that maltreatment can actually affect the way genes are activated, which could have implications for a child's long-term development.
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Study sheds new light on genes' role in schizophrenia
The Wall Street Journal
A large, multicountry study examining the genetics of schizophrenia found 108 genetic clusters associated with the disease, offering the best evidence to date about which genes play a significant role in the condition. The research, funded by multiple governments and nonprofit foundations, involved a collaboration among hundreds of scientists and included pooling genetic data from nearly 37,000 people with schizophrenia.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Researchers explain why genetic fertility problems can persist in a population
Medical Xpress
Some 15 percent of adults suffer from fertility problems, many of these due to genetic factors. This is something of a paradox: We might expect such genes, which reduce an individual's ability to reproduce, to disappear from the population. Research at the Weizmann Institute of Science that recently appeared in Nature Communications may now have solved this riddle.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine for kids: A 3-D printing company could disrupt medical device sector
MedCity News
For all of the interesting applications for 3-D printing in healthcare, its potential for pediatrics is the most compelling. It offers a way for medical devices to be customized for children who may have any number of developmental disorders that make simply adapting an adult medical device for kids impractical.
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Mayo Clinic sees big future for personalized medicine
Star Tribune via HealthLeaders Media
Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic's director of laboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world's leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells from nerves form teeth
Bioscience Technology
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that stem cells inside the soft tissues of the tooth come from an unexpected source, namely nerves. These findings are now being published in the journal Nature and contribute to brand new knowledge of how teeth are formed, how they grow and how they are able to self-repair.
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Biologists think stem cells may 'talk' to each other
Drug Discovery & Development
Biologists at the University of Sheffield's Centre for Stem Cell Biology led by professor Peter Andrews and engineers in the Complex Systems and Signal Processing Group led by professor Daniel Coca have completed a landmark study of human pluripotent stem cells. The cells are candidates for a new generation of regenerative medicine because they have the ability to produce any cell type in the body.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Will better technology save the VA?
POLITICO
The Veterans Affairs health crisis might be solved with something as simple as putting the right software in the hands of far-flung doctors. Part of the $17 billion bill to overhaul the troubled health system involves much heavier usage of information technology, so that veterans in dire need of healthcare won't have to travel long distances or get bogged down with wait times as they try to see a doctor in person.
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Image-sharing technology could resolve teleradiology interoperability issues
Health IT Outcomes
A new cloud-based platform could potentially help streamline workflows behind teleradiology and make other parts of healthcare more efficient. Cody Ebberson, CEO and co-founder of MedXT, a Y Combinator company, has developed the new technology based on his experience in teleradiology which drew his attention to some of the factors that slow down image sharing in healthcare.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Child abuse impacts how children's genes are activated
Science World Report
Child abuse may not just impact a person emotionally; it may also influence their genes.

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Harvard scientists want gene-manipulation debate
The Boston Globe
A powerful new technology could be used to manipulate nature by “editing” the genes of organisms in the wild, enabling researchers to block mosquitoes’ ability to spread malaria, for example, or to make weeds more vulnerable to pesticides, Harvard scientists said.

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Common genes linked to autism
Psych Central
New research sheds light on autism as scientists discover most of the genetic risk for the disorder comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous mutations.

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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA staff questions prostate cancer device effectiveness
Bloomberg
A device used in Europe to treat prostate cancer with lower rates of erectile dysfunction raised concerns from U.S. regulators over data the company says shows it prevents the disease's return. The device, called Ablatherm, is manufactured by EDAP TMS SA, a French company. It’s an alternative to traditional surgical and radiation treatments, and uses a robotic arm to insert a high-intensity, focused ultrasound device that heats and kills cancer cells.
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FDA expands approved use of Imbruvica for chronic lymphocytic leukemia
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the approved use of Imbruvica to treat patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who carry a deletion in chromosome 17, which is associated with poor responses to standard treatment for CLL. Imbruvica received a breakthrough therapy designation for this use.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Study backs importance of robust analytics infrastructure for ACOs
FierceHealthIT
Robust analytics infrastructure is one of the keys to success for accountable care organizations, according to a new study published in the journal Academic Medicine. Scott Berkowitz, medical director for accountable care for Johns Hopkins Medicine and assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and co-author Jennifer Pahira studied the nation's first 253 Medicare ACOs, paying particular attention to academic medical centers.
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130M patients will receive accountable care by 2017
EHR Intelligence
Accountable care organizations and value-based purchasing arrangements will be responsible for the care of 130 million patients by 2017, predicts a report by Parks Associates. Accountable care will generate nearly $1 billion in revenue for healthcare providers in 2014 as they transform into ACOs and patient-centered medical homes.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Chikungunya virus spreading across the US
By Rosemary Sparacio
The Chikungunya virus — an arthropod-borne virus transmitted to humans by the Aedes mosquito — was discovered in Tanzania, Africa, more than 60 years ago. Until recently, this virus was found primarily in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. But late last year, cases began popping up in the Caribbean. And with many Americans vacationing in the Caribbean islands, cases are now being reported in the U.S. — and at what some experts consider an alarming rate.
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New health plans' limitations anger enrollees
USA Today
Nancy Pippenger and Marcia Perez live thousands of miles apart but have the same complaint: Doctors who treated them last year won't take their insurance now, even though they haven't changed insurers. "They said, 'We take the old plan, but not the new one,'" says Perez, an attorney in Palo Alto, California.
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World Hepatitis Day: Learn more about this deadly disease
By Joan Spitrey
The World Hepatitis Alliance in coordination with the World Health Organization recognizes July 28 as World Hepatitis Day 2014. The WHO considers viral hepatitis as the "world's most serious disease," and it is estimated that 1.4 million people die each year from this disease. Compare that number to the 1.3 million people who died from HIV in 2013, which was down considerably from 1.7 million reported in 2005. The goal of World Hepatitis Day is to increase awareness and to call for access to treatment, prevention programs and government action.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Big data peeps at your medical records to find drug problems (NPR)
Investigators identify genes that contribute to radiation resistance (Phys.org)
Big brother is watching — your waistline (POLITICO)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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