This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Aug. 1, 2013

   Home   Mission/Vision    Membership    Corporate Membership    CME/CEU    JMCM    Contact Us

REGISTER TODAY
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Researchers discover DNA 'repair' enzyme that could enhance cancer treatments
Smarter America via Fox News
Researchers have discovered an enzyme responsible for repairing single DNA strands damaged through cell division, which they hope will someday lead to better treatments for cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. As we grow, the number of cells in our body must grow as well. In order to multiply, a cell's DNA must divide into two strands, creating two identical templates for the genomes of the "daughter" cells.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Researchers explore genetic links between nicotine, cancer using 'next-generation sequencing'
Virginia Polytechnic Institute via Medical Xpress
Nicotine is the addictive chemical found in cigarettes, but researchers believe that it could have more influence than previously realized on the underlying genetics of cancer, according to a recently published study in the journal PLOS One. Tobacco smoke contains many chemicals, including nicotine, but nicotine stands out because of its widely accepted connection to cancer, especially lung cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Unraveling genetic networks
American Institute of Physics via Phys.Org
If genes are the currency of life, then the whole economies are genetic networks, which include genes as well as the complex webs of interactions and interconnections between them. Genetic networks are integrally important to the proper development and functioning of an organism, just as genes are, but they tend to be far more complex and difficult to understand.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


New compound could combat castration-resistant prostate cancer
FierceBiotech
Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute may have hit on the next big thing in prostate cancer treatment. They've developed a compound called SMIP004 that works by zeroing in on prostate cancer cells and compromising their ability to withstand environmental stress — a trademark of cancer cells. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Personalized risk calculator for women's cancers
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered a new way of predicting whether a woman is at risk of cancer of the breast, ovaries or uterus, according to a study published in the journal PLoS Medicine. Researchers from the National Cancer Institute and colleagues from other U.S. medical institutes developed "absolute risk prediction models" that could help women predict their chances of developing breast, ovarian or endometrial cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Could sleeping stem cells hold key to treatment of aggressive blood cancer?
ScienceDaily
Scientists studying an aggressive form of leukemia have discovered that rather than displacing healthy stem cells in the bone marrow as previously believed, the cancer is putting them to sleep to prevent them forming new blood cells. The finding offers the potential that these stem cells could somehow be turned back on, offering a new form of treatment for the condition, called Acute Myeloid Leukemia.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stem cell success: Urine used to create teeth
Medical News Today
Stem cell research is opening up the way for new teeth "grown" from an unlikely source — human urine. Chinese researchers describe how stem cells derived from urine could be used to generate solid organs and tissues, including teeth. Their study is published in the open-access journal Cell Regeneration. The researchers hope the technique might one day help provide new, tailor-made teeth for dental patients.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Alzheimer's risk gene tracked in search for new therapies (Bloomberg)
Genetic testing improved student learning in personalized medicine class (ScienceDaily)
Are doctors passing the buck on healthcare costs? (Los Angeles Times)
Stem cells help blind mice see (AFP via Discovery News)
Top 5 pathways to personalized medicine (Healthcare IT News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Top 5 technology trends in the global medical devices market
HIT Consultant
The new 2013 Frost & Sullivan outlook study provides projections for the global medical devices market. The Research identifies market sectors and subsectors poised for expansion; discusses key opportunities in emerging markets; identifies the four Rs in the medical device spectrum; and covers strategies for success in the new market paradigm. Home care, structural heart, robotic assistance, infection control tools and neurology devices were identified as the top five growth sectors in the medical device market.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


70 percent of medical errors can be blamed on technology and equipment failures
Medical Daily
Advances in technology have allowed us to do things once thought impossible. However, working smarter may lead to unforeseen errors thanks to malfunctioning technology or other related issues. How many errors occur that lead to adverse events, and how can medial professional hope to avoid these errors if they are coming from useful equipment?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Researchers discover DNA 'repair' enzyme that could enhance cancer treatments
Smarter America via Fox News
Researchers have discovered an enzyme responsible for repairing single DNA strands damaged through cell division, which they hope will someday lead to better treatments for cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Scientists control genes with light: New method for understanding function
Science World Report
Genes make up the roadmaps of our bodies, revealing exactly how we function. Controlling these genes could allow us to learn more about them, possibly revealing new insight into diseases.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Scientists identify genetic basis of allergies: Treatments could soon target genes, not symptoms
Medical Daily
Allergies plague people of all ages for at least six months of each year. Often, little can be done to treat allergies, and instead people take steps to soothe symptoms.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


White House touts slow increase in health care costs
USA Today
Personal healthcare costs rose in the 12 months ending in May at the slowest rate in the last 50 years, as spending on hospital and nursing home services declined, the White House announced. Personal consumption spending rose 1.1 percent, Alan Krueger, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Could the future of healthcare mean no waits in hospitals?
Fast Company
As medical treatment is impacted by technology, consumerization and the mobile revolution, we may see a world where your doctor already knows why you're sick and can treat you over the phone — leaving the hospitals for the true emergencies.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Are 90 percent of FDA drugs approved in last 30 years no more effective than existing drugs?
Forbes
Donald W. Light of the School of Public Health, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, states the following: "A forthcoming article for the special issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, edited by Marc Rodwin and supported by the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, presents evidence that about 90 percent of all new drugs approved by the FDA over the past 30 years are little or no more effective for patients than existing drugs. All of them may be better than indirect measures or placebos, but most are no better for patients than previous drugs approved as better against these measures."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Aug. 1, 2013
July 25, 2013
July 18, 2013
July 11, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063