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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada

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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will be held November, 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.
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GENOMICS


Researchers discover universal molecular 'flag' that highlights critical genes
Phys.org
After probing more than 200 genetic data sets, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a molecular flag that labels genes critical to a cell's function. The flag appears to exist universally — in cells ranging from worms to humans — and can be used to help decipher the function of unfamiliar cells, said Anne Brunet, Ph.D., associate professor of genetics and senior author of the study.
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Is there a happiness gene?
LiveScience via Yahoo News
One secret to happiness may lie in genes, a new study suggests. Denmark and other Scandinavian countries regularly top world happiness rankings, and while many factors influence happiness, genetics may play a larger role than previously thought, according to the study authors.
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How much sleep do you need? Why sleep deprivation could be a gene problem
Medical Daily
Eight hours of sleep each night could be a tall task for many people, especially those for whom daily tasks eat up all but a scrap of free time at night. New research suggests biology may offer a promising way out, as fewer than six hours of sleep a night may not lead to sleep deprivation if a person’s genes aren’t so high-maintenance.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine and companion diagnostics go hand-in-hand
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Personalized medicine is an evolving field of medicine in which treatments are tailored to the individual patient. You may have a condition, for example, that is caused by a mutation in your genes. With advances in personalized medicine, you might be prescribed a medication that targets that specific mutation.
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Single-cell approach to personalized medicine
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
As one of the most prevalent causes of death across the globe, the burden of cancer is still sharply increasing, predominantly due to the aging population. As such, the current focus of many researchers is on how to accurately diagnose and treat various cancer types. However, human cancers usually carry several different genomic variations, such as copy number variation and point mutations, which essentially lead to tumor heterogeneity.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Japanese researcher, an author of a discredited stem cell study, is dead
The New York Times
A leading Japanese life science researcher and co-author of a stem cell study that was later retracted because of errors and allegations of misconduct has taken his own life, his colleagues said. Yoshiki Sasai, deputy director of the Riken Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, was a co-author of a highly publicized study claiming that a simple acid bath could turn cells in the body into stem cells, which could one day be used for a wide range of medical treatments.
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Experts: Stem cell beauty treatments? Probably bogus
HealthDay News via CBS News
Could stem cell injections help rejuvenate your face or body? Probably not, plastic surgery experts say, but ads for these types of bogus procedures abound on the Internet. "Stem cells offer tremendous potential, but the marketplace is saturated with unsubstantiated and sometimes fraudulent claims that may place patients at risk," a team led by Dr. Michael Longaker, of Stanford University Medical Center, wrote in a review published in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
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Team reveals molecular competition drives adult stem cells to specialize
Phys.org
Adult organisms ranging from fruit flies to humans harbor adult stem cells, some of which renew themselves through cell division while others differentiate into the specialized cells needed to replace worn-out or damaged organs and tissues.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Virtual therapy expanding mental healthcare
The Boston Globe
Facing a new diagnosis of cancer, Josh Stoffregen needed his therapist more than ever. But with daily chemo and a depleted immune system, leaving his home in the winter to see his psychologist in her Manhattan office was a risky venture.
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Infographic: The state of electronic health records
Nextgov
Electronic health records have been a somewhat controversial technology, with concerns over patient privacy and HIPAA violations. EHRs can also expensive and take time to implement, as evidenced by the Defense Department and Veterans Affairs' slow, costly adoption of the technology. The trend, however, indicates that EHR use has increased, with many doctors citing the improved care EHRs may provide.
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Are healthcare technology startups answering the right questions?
Healthcare IT News
Healthcare technology is hot stuff, with startups and investors from Silicon Valley to the Charles River chasing after the next paradigm-shifting blockbuster innovation. Each passing quarter sees an ever-increasing tally of eager rounds of funding. In the first three quarters of 2013, health IT venture capital leapt from $493 million to $623 million to $737 million, respectively, according to Mercom Capital Group.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Researchers discover universal molecular 'flag' that highlights critical genes
Phys.org
After probing more than 200 genetic data sets, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a molecular flag that labels genes critical to a cell's function.

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Child abuse impacts how children's genes are activated
Science World Report
Child abuse may not just impact a person emotionally; it may also influence their genes.

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Study sheds new light on genes' role in schizophrenia
The Wall Street Journal
A large, multicountry study examining the genetics of schizophrenia found 108 genetic clusters associated with the disease, offering the best evidence to date about which genes play a significant role in the condition.

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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


US FDA says 'stands ready' to work with companies developing Ebola drugs
Reuters
The worst Ebola outbreak in history is heaping new pressure on U.S. regulators to speed the development of treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 700 people since February. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in an emailed statement the agency "stands ready" to work with companies and investigators working with patients "in dire need of treatment."
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FDA to begin regulating laboratory test devices
The Washington Post
The Food and Drug Administration said that it plans to begin regulating certain diagnostic tests developed by laboratories, which have proliferated and grown more sophisticated in recent years, spurring increased concerns about their safety and reliability. Just as new drugs must be proved safe and effective before reaching consumers, the devices used to diagnose complex medical conditions also must work properly to avoid subjecting patients to harmful or unnecessary treatments, FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said.
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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Number of patients in ACOs expected to hit 130M by 2017
Healthcare Informatics
The number of U.S. patients receiving care from an accountable care organization is expected to increase from 40 million in 2015 to more than 130 million by 2017, according to a recent report from the Dallas-based Parks Associates, a market research and consulting company. The research firm says the new emphasis on performance-based metrics and payment will boost usage of this business model as well as the healthcare technologies that promise to improve care outcomes.
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ACO directory: 272 ACOs in America
Becker's Hospital Review
Accountable care organizations have become increasingly popular with the switch from fee for service to pay for performance, and the number of commercial and government ACOs continues to grow. Seeking to improve the quality of healthcare and reduce costs, Pioneer ACOs were created for the more advanced health systems that had already achieved a high level of integration. CMS named the original 32 Pioneer ACOs in December 2011.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Newly insured, many now face learning curve
The New York Times
Advocates of the Affordable Care Act, focused until now on persuading people to buy health insurance, have moved to a crucial new phase: making sure the eight million Americans who did so understand their often complicated policies and use them properly. The political stakes are high, as support for the healthcare law will hinge at least partly on whether people have good experiences with their new coverage.
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False hope for new superbug treatments
By Mike Wokasch
The lack of effective treatments for antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" represents a serious global healthcare issue with potentially disastrous consequences. In the hopes of finding new treatments, a number of organizations and governments are struggling to secure and provide sufficient financial and nonfinancial incentives to encourage more research. Unfortunately, the fallacy of some of these initiatives is that more money, more companies and more compounds will not deliver the products we need.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers explain why genetic fertility problems can persist in a population (Medical Xpress)
Chikungunya virus spreading across the US ( By Rosemary Sparacio)
New health plans' limitations anger enrollees (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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