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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Protein changes are discovered that control whether a gene functions are discovered
ScienceDaily
By studying a gene in yeast, a team of scientists has found that modifications to histones — proteins associated with DNA — can control whether or not a gene is allowed to function and may be important in maintaining the genes' "expression potential" so that future cells behave as their parent cells did.
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Harsh in hard times? A gene may influence mom's behavior
NPR
A gene that affects the brain's dopamine system appears to have influenced mothers' behavior during a recent economic downturn, researchers say. At the beginning of the recession that began in 2007, mothers with the "sensitive" version of a gene called DRD2 became more likely to strike or scream at their children, the researchers say. Mothers with the other "insensitive" version of the gene didn't change their behavior.
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The beer-smell gene and other ways DNA drives our senses
TIME via Yahoo News
Beer smells like beer and a violet smells like a violet to everyone, right? Maybe not, according to the latest study that traced the way we smell to differences in our genes. It turns out that our senses are intimately connected to our DNA, and small variations in our genes can determine whether we are partial to the smell of blue cheese, or can't stand the taste of cilantro.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Cancer research implies future for personalized medicine, reduction in animal testing
Medical Xpress
On Aug. 6 the Journal of Visualized Experiments will publish two new methods for scientists to study and treat tumor growth. The methods introduce a lab-born, human tissue structure with replicated human biochemistry — offering scientists the opportunity to grow, observe and ultimately learn how to treat biopsied human tumor cells.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


To screen or not to screen: A personalized approach
Medpage Today
Personalized prioritization for health services and screenings may optimize gains in life expectancy, researchers suggested. Disease screening, health recommendations and risk-reduction counseling based on individual patient characteristics could result in more robust gains in life expectancy than the practices currently in place, according to Glen B. Taksler, Ph.D., of New York University, and colleagues.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


For $60,000, you can store your stem cells in this bank
Fast Company
French biotech entrepreneur Andre Choulika is working on an unusual and pricey project: A stem cell bank for adults. Choulika's stem cell bank, Sceil, is a new Singapore-based operation that claims to transform human skin cells into stem cells and then to store them for future medical procedures. For $60,000, clients can have a sample of their underarm skin punched at a local dermatologist, and sent to Singapore, where the cells are converted into stem cells over the course of a few months. The $60,000 only covers the first two years of storage.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Advance in regenerative medicine could make reprogrammed cells safer while improving their function
ScienceDaily
The enormous promise of regenerative medicine is matched by equally enormous challenges. But a new finding by a team of researchers led by Weill Cornell Medical College has the potential to improve both the safety and performance of reprogrammed cells.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers discover DNA 'repair' enzyme that could enhance cancer treatments (Smarter America via Fox News)
Researchers explore genetic links between nicotine, cancer using 'next-generation sequencing' (Virginia Polytechnic Institute via Medical Xpress)
Top 5 technology trends in the global medical devices market (HIT Consultant)
70 percent of medical errors can be blamed on technology and equipment failures (Medical Daily)
Are 90 percent of FDA drugs approved in last 30 years no more effective than existing drugs? (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Researchers adapt microscopic technology for bionic body parts and other medical devices
Phys.Org
Tiny sensors and motors are everywhere, telling your smartphone screen to rotate and your camera to focus. Now, a team of researchers at Tel Aviv University has found a way to print biocompatible components for these micro-machines, making them ideal for use in medical devices, like bionic arms.
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Remote monitoring drives global telemedicine growth
FierceHealthIT
Remote patient telemonitoring is the biggest driver of the global telemedicine market, according to a new report from Research and Markets. The analysis predicts that the global telemedicine market will grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 18.9 percent from 2012 to 2016, primarily due to an increase remote patient telemonitoring and strategic partnerships among vendors.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Protein changes are discovered that control whether a gene functions are discovered
ScienceDaily
By studying a gene in yeast, a team of scientists has found that modifications to histones — proteins associated with DNA — can control whether or not a gene is allowed to function and may be important in maintaining the genes' "expression potential" so that future cells behave as their parent cells did.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Personalized risk calculator for women's cancers
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered a new way of predicting whether a woman is at risk of cancer of the breast, ovaries or uterus, according to a study published in the journal PLoS Medicine.

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Stem cell success: Urine used to create teeth
Medical News Today
Stem cell research is opening up the way for new teeth "grown" from an unlikely source — human urine. Chinese researchers describe how stem cells derived from urine could be used to generate solid organs and tissues, including teeth.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Mobile is helping to spur the next revolution in healthcare — the transfer of power to consumers And Patients
Business Insider
Generally speaking, doctors stopped making house calls around the 1970s. But mobile devices are helping doctors attend to patients remotely, and manage their case loads with greater efficiency and cost-savings. From the moment Apple demonstrated iPhone-connected blood pressure and glucose monitors in 2009, hopes have grown around the future of mobile medicine, or mHealth.
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Healthcare law raises pressure on public unions
The New York Times
Cities and towns across the country are pushing municipal unions to accept cheaper health benefits in anticipation of a component of the Affordable Care Act that will tax expensive plans starting in 2018. The so-called Cadillac tax was inserted into the Affordable Care Act at the advice of economists who argued that expensive health insurance with the employee bearing little cost made people insensitive to the cost of care.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA warns of rare acetaminophen risk
Medscape via WebMD
Anyone who develops a rash, blister or some other skin reaction while taking acetaminophen should stop using the drug and seek medical care immediately. The painkiller poses the risk for three rare but potentially fatal skin disorders, the FDA announced. The three serious, bad reactions that patients and doctors should watch out for are Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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