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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

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Nov. 14-15
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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

The FDA has recently approved Skyla, a new hormone-releasing system that is placed in the uterus for the prevention of pregnancy. Click here to view the Press Release in PDF Format!

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Scientists find way to predict and control gene expression
Medical Xpress
EPFL scientists have developed a "guide" that can be used to precisely predict the number of proteins a given gene will produce under varying conditions. This work will help biologists to engineer cells. Genes are segments of DNA within our cells that oversee how our bodies take shape. They receive orders to produce specific proteins; these proteins become the building blocks of everything in our body, from organs to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. Our genes are thus at the very center of who we are.
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Genes discovered to explain high altitude disease
Medical News Today
Scientists say they have discovered why some humans develop chronic mountain sickness while other people can adapt to high altitudes. According to a study published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, it is all in the genes. Researchers from the University of California-San Diego say they have decoded a genetic basis for chronic mountain sickness, also known as Monge's disease, which could potentially lead to the development of new treatments.
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Researchers find new epilepsy genes, hope treatments will follow
CBS News
Epilepsy researchers are reporting they have found up to 25 new genetic mutations that may be behind some of the most debilitating forms of the condition. By identifying these new mutations they found on nine key genes associated with the disorder, the researchers hope they can develop new treatments that precisely target the mutations.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Fruit flies aid efforts to develop personalized cancer treatments
Scientific American
For years clinicians have puzzled over the observation that people with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop certain malignancies, such as pancreatic, breast and liver cancers. The reason behind their confusion: standard biological principles predict that, if anything, folks with diabetes should suffer fewer tumors, not more of them. However, new research on fruit flies, published in the scientific journal Cell, may have finally cracked the long-standing mystery.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Biotechs crowd list of top growth leaders as big pharmas shrink staffs
FierceBiotech
Anyone even remotely interested in the biopharma industry will not be surprised to hear that many of the biggest companies in the business have been working overtime to shrink staffs. EP Vantage put its analysts to the task of examining the numbers, though, and found that the overall amount of downsizing isn't quite as big as you may have been led to believe.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Developmental on-switch: Substances that convert body cells back into stem cells initially activate all genes in the embryo
ScienceDaily
Substances that convert body cells back into stem cells initially activate all genes in the embryo. Freiburg researchers have demonstrated for the first time why the molecular cocktail responsible for generating stem cells works.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Shining stem cells reveals how our skin is maintained
Phys.Org
All organs in our body rely on stem cells in order to maintain their function. The skin is our largest organ and forms a shield against the environment. New research results from BRIC, University of Copenhagen and Cambridge University, challenge current stem cell models and explains how the skin is maintained throughout life. The results have just been published in the recognized journal Cell Stem Cell.
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Injected stem cells repair heart attack damage
Healthline
New research shows that stem cells can repair the damage wreaked by heart disease, with cautious optimism from doctors pending the outcomes of clinical trials on humans. The journal Cell published this study by researchers at King's College London and others on Thursday. In an experiment on rats, they found that stem cells must be present in order for the heart muscle to repair itself after an attack.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Gene study uncovers origins of many common cancers (Reuters)
Mental disorders linked by genetic traits (Medical New Today)
A vision for the future of healthcare (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
Tumor-targeting T cells engineered (The Scientist)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


App lets doctors securely share medical images
Dermatology Times
Many are calling it an "Instagram for healthcare professionals," and one thing is for sure — if you're not used to seeing graphic surgical photos, you've been warned. Figure 1, a free social medical photo-sharing app available for iOS in the iTunes store, has been gaining attention since it debuted early this summer. The app is the brainchild of Joshua Landy, M.D., a critical care specialist in Toronto and co-founder of the app.
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Telemedicine: A community perspective
By Tracy Stanley
Developed so doctors could monitor astronauts in space, the concept of telemedicine isn't a new one. What has changed, however, is the technology that now allows global access to this way of practicing medicine. Physicians are starting to appreciate the worth and importance of being accessible to remote communities via video conference. The purpose of this article is not to discuss the mechanics of telemedicine but rather to underscore its value to the remote communities it serves.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Gene study uncovers origins of many common cancers
Reuters
Researchers in Britain have set out the first comprehensive map of mutational processes behind the development of tumors — work that should in future lead to better ways to treat and prevent a wide range of cancers.

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3 technologies that will change healthcare forever
Care2
When you think about how primitive medical technology was just a few years ago, it seems surprising that the human race managed to survive.

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Protein changes are discovered that control whether a gene functions are discovered
ScienceDaily
By studying a gene in yeast, a team of scientists has found that modifications to histones — proteins associated with DNA — can control whether or not a gene is allowed to function and may be important in maintaining the genes' "expression potential" so that future cells behave as their parent cells did.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


5 good things the Affordable Care Act imposed on healthcare
By Mike Wokasch
The U.S. healthcare market is well entrenched with operational complexity, an inefficient cost structure and serious quality issues. The diversity of treatment, along with huge, inexplicable variability in costs and how care is paid for make the Affordable Care Act even more challenging to implement. Whether or not you are a fan of "Obamacare," this government-driven initiative has already facilitated five major changes to healthcare.
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The coming liberation: Healthcare for all without Obamacare
Forbes
Obamacare was pushed through on the promise of universal health coverage for everyone. But the CBO now scores Obamacare as leaving 30 million uninsured even 10 years after implementation. In fact, Obamacare will increase the uninsured rather than reduce them. Former CBO Chief Douglas Holtz-Eakin published a study in 2011 arguing that more than 40 million workers will lose their employer provided health insurance under the incentives of Obamacare.
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Is your healthcare considered preventive?
Los Angeles Times
When David Brutman received a $3,000 bill for his wife's colonoscopy, he was angry and confused. He thought the cost would all be covered because under the Affordable Care Act most insurers must cover the full cost of preventive care such as check-ups, vaccinations and screenings. It seemed straightforward enough, yet Brutman, a 41-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur, learned the hard way that the lines are easily blurred when it comes to determining whether services are considered preventive care or treatments that require payment.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


FDA may fast track drugs to fight HIV
Bloomberg via The Boston Globe
Harold Fuller has run out of options to keep his HIV at bay. Fuller, 56, of Brooklyn, has lived with the virus for 20 years. Earlier in his illness, he stayed ahead of HIV's ability to mutate by changing medicines every two years. For the past five years, though, Fuller has had to take the same pills because of a lack of new treatments. "I've been on medication since 1995, and after a while everything stops working," Fuller said. His doctor, he said, "has no clue what to do."
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FDA issues guidelines on wireless medical devices
InformationWeek
The Food and Drug Administration has released final guidelines on the design, testing and use of radio-frequency wireless medical devices. Although it doesn't promulgate legally enforceable responsibilities, the document is intended to guide both device manufacturers and healthcare providers toward the safe and secure use of wireless medical devices. Covered are devices "that are implanted, worn on the body or other external wireless medical devices intended for use in hospitals, homes, clinics, clinical laboratories and blood establishments."
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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