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Check out JMCM’s new website at www.jmcmpub.org

Seattle Genetics Announces FDA Regular Approval of ADCETRIS® for Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients at High Risk of Relapse or Progression. Click here to view more information.

We wanted you to be aware that the FDA has granted accelerated approval of IBRANCE® (palbociclib) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with ER+/HER2- advanced breast cancer. Click here to see the press release!

Otezla® (apremilast) is approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. Please click here for more information.

OAs part of APhA's longstanding and ongoing commitment to helping its members ensure optimal and safe patient use of prescription medications, nonprescription products, and dietary supplements, APhA convened national pharmacy and medicine leaders and other stakeholders on March 26. Click here for more information .

 



Fall Managed Care Forum: Register today!
NAMCP

Register today for the 2015 Fall Forum being held November 12-13, 2015 at The Bellagio in Las Vegas. Click here to visit the conference website.
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GENOMICS


A fat-burning gene may help weight loss
TIME
There are many ways to get rid of excess fat, most of them involving diet and exercise. But scientists have identified a gene that may do the trick without all that effort. A Holy Grail of fat — one that can turn more quickly into energy and melt away without building up in those unwanted bulges — is actually backed by some intriguing evidence.
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Holocaust survivors' trauma lives on in kids' genes
USA Today
Holocaust survivors pass on trauma through their genes, making their children and possibly even grandchildren more susceptible to PTSD and other stress disorders, according to new research. The Guardian reports researchers looked at 32 Jewish men and women who survived traumatic experiences at the hands of Nazis during World War II and their children.
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Researchers uncover genetic circuit involved in obesity
News-Medical.net
Like many other conditions, obesity is caused by an interplay between genetic and environmental factors. While efforts to combat the obesity epidemic will need to include changes in diet and exercise, insights into the genes involved may also help with prevention and treatment.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine holds promise for cancer patients
CBS News
Three years ago, Ivette Giancola started having abdominal and back pain. She went to the doctor and tests revealed that the then 37-year-old-mother had stage 4 pancreatic cancer. "You hear the word 'metastasized' and it's very, very scary," she told CBS News. "I was not sure I was going to make it."
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Study provides hope for some human stem cell therapies
Medical Xpress
An international team of scientists headed by biologists at UC San Diego has discovered that an important class of stem cells known as human "induced pluripotent stem cells," or iPSCs, which are derived from an individual's own cells, can be differentiated into various types of functional cells with different fates of immune rejection.
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Scientists claim fix to stem cell immune rejection problem
Forbes
Last year, Japanese researchers announced that the first human patient would be treated with induced pluripotent stem cells in an attempt to reverse a degenerative eye condition called macular degeneration that leads to vision loss. Now, a team of scientists headed by biologists at UC San Diego has discovered how induced pluripotent stem cells, which are derived from an individual’s own cells, could be programmed to avoid rejection from the immune system.
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EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Alphabet/Google has given birth to a healthcare tech company
Los Angeles Times
Over the past couple of years, Google has hired experts in diseases and physiology, pairing them with top software engineers, to tackle major healthcare issues. Projects include developing contact lenses to allow diabetics to constantly monitor glucose levels, defining “healthy” traits and testing disease-detection pills capable of communicating to a special wristband.
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Intel joins race to build platform for medical data
The Wall Street Journal
Intel announced its Collaborative Cancer Cloud, a software initiative intended to help cancer researchers share genomes they’ve sequenced as well as medical images and clinical information. The project aims to provide a software platform for a system — presumably running on Intel-based hardware — that would aggregate data from many sources, allowing researchers to collaborate across institutions and disciplines.
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  Getting Patients Back to Better

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ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois adds three accountable care organizations
Healthcare Finance News
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois has developed accountable care organizations with three more provider-partners, bringing the total number of ACOs under the insurer to five, the insurer announced this month. The organizations are Independent Physicians' ACO of Chicago, Northwest Community Healthcare and the Illinois Health Partners — comprised Edward Hospital and Medical Group, Elmhurst Hospital and Medical Group and DuPage Medical Group.
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The last gasp of fee-for-service?
U.S. News & World Report
Medicare is going in multiple directions at once. On the one hand, it is trying hard to move away from fee-for-service payments to doctors, where each tiny service has its own code and its own payment, and instead, toward more bundled payment or even payment of a fixed amount per person per month to accountable care organizations.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


The FDA is basically approving everything — here's the data to prove it
Forbes
Remember when the FDA rejected drugs? We just got treated to a whole lot of drama as to whether Addyi, a drug to boost women’s libidos, would be approved. But based on the data, that approval was probably a foregone conclusion. As recently as 2008, companies filing applications to sell never-before-marketed drugs, which are referred to by the FDA as “new molecular entities,” faced rejection 66 percent of the time.
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FDA to testosterone makers: 'Work together on a single trial'
Medscape
To clarify how testosterone therapy may affect cardiovascular outcomes — which is especially important since many men are using it inappropriately for "age-related hypogonadism" as opposed to "classic hypogonadism" — the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is now requiring testosterone manufacturers to conduct a controlled clinical trial.
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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Waves of change: Helping staff navigate the turbulent tides of healthcare
By Christina Thielst
With an emphasis on reducing costs while improving quality and access, the transformation of the U.S. healthcare delivery system is creating additional pressure at the point of care — the encounters between clinicians and their patients. While change is due, it also requires balance and support for those who are caught at the crux as new models of care are being rolled out and payment models are still being developed and implemented.
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What can go wrong with a private health insurance exchange? A lot
Forbes
The fastest growing part of the health insurance market these days is the private exchange. About 6 million workers selected their health plans through private exchanges this year, double last year’s number. The consulting firm Accenture predicts 40 million will do so by 2018. In general, private exchanges are online health insurance marketplaces.
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Do physicians really hate their EHRs?
By Scott Rupp
Physicians hate their EHRs. Research shows there's no love lost between doctors and the technology. According to a recent study, just 34 percent of physicians said they were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their EHR system in 2014, down from 62 percent in 2010. Diving a little deeper, the percentage of physicians unhappy with their system stood at 54 percent in 2014. If there were an election to determine whether to employ the use of EHRs, the majority would say no to this candidate.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Can Medicare afford personalized medicine? (The San Diego Union-Tribune)
Do the genes of warriors win the evolution battle? (The Wall Street Journal)
A change to out-of-pocket health insurance limits irks employers (NPR)
Most health insurance co-ops are losing money, federal audit finds (The New York Times)
'Jumping genes' unusually active in many gastrointestinal cancers (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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