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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Should you get sequenced? Not all bad genes predict disease
NBC News
For NBC News chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman, having a "boring genome," is a good problem to have. Snyderman revealed a snapshot of her genetic code on TODAY Wednesday, after having two types of genetic testing. The first, a whole genome sequencing test by Illumina, costs about $5,000. She now has the complete results from it stored on her iPad. "What's fascinating ... is that this is me, right here on a tablet," Snyderman said. "And as we learn more about what genes underlie specific diseases, I'll have this as a reference."
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Gene that causes devastating mitochondrial diseases identified
ScienceDaily
Researchers have identified a novel disease gene in which mutations cause rare but devastating genetic diseases known as mitochondrial disorders. Nine rare, disease-causing mutations of the gene, FBXL4, were found in nine affected children in seven families, including three siblings from the same family.
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Key 'personalized medicine' review published
ScienceDaily
Research into 'personalized' medicine is being led by a University of Greenwich team. Currently, many medicines which are prescribed to patients either do not work properly or have some significant side effects. The aim of personalized medicine, sometimes called "precision" medicine, is to ensure that the most appropriate medicine is given to each patient and that the medicine is both effective and safe.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Targeted drug delivery is a major problem for the treatment of many diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles, or MNPs, can be considered as promising drug-delivery candidates due to their special properties. They can be handled easily by an external magnetic field and can be delivered by passive and active strategies. Furthermore, visualization has become easy in MRI scans due to the use of MNP. However, there are some drawbacks to the use of MNPs.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Harmonizing a broken heart: Stem cells keep cardiac beat in synchrony
Science World Report
Stem cell therapy used to regenerate injured tissue in the heart also restores synchronous pumping, new research shows, and could thus be used to make pacing devices redundant. The team behind the study proposes a novel strategy of "biological resynchronization" in which stem cells repair heart muscle damage to reestablish correct cardiac motion, replacing pacing devices.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Promising stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury and stroke
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Human umbilical cord blood is a rich source of stem cells, which could be potentially used for the treatment of hematopoietic diseases. Ischemic brain damage is a major cause of mortality and severe neurologic disability. Recently, the use of human umbilical cord blood for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and ischemic stroke has been explored in several studies.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Insight into the origin of the genetic code (ScienceDaily)
Novel strategies: Side effects with long-term antibiotic treatment (By Dorothy L. Tengler)
Could stem cells replace cancerous tissues? (Science World Report)
Do you know what personalized medicine means? (GigaOM)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Doctor wearing Google Glass live streams surgery
Mashable
A surgeon in Ohio wearing Google Glass live streamed a knee surgery to remote colleagues, demonstrating how the medical world can use wearable technology like Glass. Dr. Christopher Kaeding, a surgeon at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, was performing a surgery on a 47-year-old patient's injured knee ligament, during this milestone event. Kaeding wore Google Glass during the surgery to show his live point-of-view to people miles away, according to the university statement.
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Technology: The cure for rising healthcare costs?
MIT Technology Review
In a financially stretched healthcare market, medical technology is sometimes seen as an expensive luxury. But use of the right technology can actually cut the overall cost of medical treatment and improve patient outcomes. You might be wondering how. We live longer now, and we are more sedentary, so chronic diseases such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and Alzheimer's are on the rise.
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4 ways that quantum technology could transform healthcare
Fast Company
You may not grasp the finer points of how quantum mechanics works, but scientists are using its tricky rules to make medicine faster, less painful and more personalized. In July, the International Conference on Quantum Technologies brought together the leading minds in physics to discuss the latest advances in quantum technology.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Should you get sequenced? Not all bad genes predict disease
NBC News
For NBC News chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman, having a "boring genome," is a good problem to have. Snyderman revealed a snapshot of her genetic code on TODAY Wednesday, after having two types of genetic testing.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Scientists grow mini brains from stem cells
CNN
We've seen beating heart tissue, windpipes and bladders all grown from stem cells. Now researchers have taken another important step forward by growing mini brains from these programmable cells.

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Mom's genes may affect how fast you age
LiveScience via Fox News
Eating well, sleeping well and exercising may help keep people young at heart, but mutated genes passed down from mothers may also predetermine aging rates, new research suggests.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Young adults and low-cost health insurance
U.S. News & World Report
Since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law in 2010, more than 3 million young adults age 19 to 26 have been able to stay on their parents' health insurance policies, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But an estimated 16 million to 19 million others are still uninsured.
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The most efficient healthcare systems in the world
The Huffington Post
As supporters and opponents of the Affordable Care Act debate the best way to overhaul a clearly broken healthcare system, it's perhaps helpful to put American medicine in a global perspective. This infographic is based on a recent Bloomberg ranking of the most efficient countries for healthcare, and highlights enormous gap between the soaring cost of treatment in the U.S. and its quality and effectiveness.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Leaders urge FDA to keep up with mHealth
Healthcare IT News
A Washington D.C. law firm known for its work with mHealth companies is asking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to "adopt significant fundamental changes to keep pace with medicine and technology." The request is part of a 12-page white paper submitted to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology by Bradley Merrill Thompson, an attorney with Epstein Becker Green and the legal counsel for the mHealth Regulatory Coalition.
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FDA grants priority review for Nexavar for treatment of thyroid cancer
Healio
The FDA has granted priority review status to the oral multikinase inhibitor sorafenib for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. "We are very pleased that the FDA has chosen to grant Priority Review to sorafenib," Pamela A. Cyrus, M.D., vice president and head of U.S. medical affairs at Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, said in a press release.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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