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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
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Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

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Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Male sensitivity written in the genes
The New York Times
In human development, certain genes act as master switches, ensuring that we are born with similar attributes (one head, two lungs, 10 fingers) in nearly all circumstances. Such genes tend to be highly reliable and resistant to environmental factors. But the gene responsible for activating male development is surprisingly unstable, leaving the pathway to male sexuality fraught with inconsistency, a study finds.
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Researchers develop new way to control genes
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered a way to switch genes on or off inside yeast and human cells by controlling the point at which DNA is copied into messenger RNA, according to a study published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology. Researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology say that this discovery could enable scientists to better understand the role of the genes, make it easier to engineer cells and lead to better drugs and treatments.
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Moving genes have scientists seeing spots
ScienceDaily
An international team of scientists led by the U.K.'s John Innes Centre and including scientists from Australia, Portugal, China and Italy has perfected a way of watching genes move within a living plant cell. Using this technique scientists watched glowing spots, which marked the position of the genes, huddle together in the cold as the genes were switched "off."
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BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Stepping closer to personalized medicine
ScienceDaily
Why do some people develop disease while others with the same genetic mutation don't? For example, the National Cancer Institute estimates that women who inherit a harmful BRCA2 mutation have a 45 percent chance of developing breast cancer by age 70. What protects the other 55 percent with the same BRCA2 mutation?
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


Broad Institute and Bayer join forces to develop novel treatment options in cancer therapy
Bioscience Technology
The Broad Institute has entered into a strategic alliance with Bayer Healthcare in the area of oncogenomics and drug discovery. The goal of this collaboration is to jointly discover and develop therapeutic agents that selectively target cancer genome alterations over a period of five years.
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


Promising stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury and stroke
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Human umbilical cord blood is a rich source of stem cells, which could be potentially used for the treatment of hematopoietic diseases. Ischemic brain damage is a major cause of mortality and severe neurologic disability. Recently, the use of human umbilical cord blood for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and ischemic stroke has been explored in several studies.
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Scientists grow new stem cells in a living mouse
Reuters
Scientists have succeeded in generating new stem cells in living mice and say their success opens up possibilities for the regeneration of damaged tissue in people with conditions ranging from heart failure to spinal cord injury. The researchers used the same "recipe" of growth-boosting ingredients normally used for making stem cells in a petri dish, but introduced them instead into living laboratory mice and found they were able to create so-called reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Gene that causes devastating mitochondrial diseases identified (ScienceDaily)
4 ways that quantum technology could transform healthcare (Fast Company)
Promising stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury and stroke (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)
Doctor wearing Google Glass live streams surgery (Mashable)
Harmonizing a broken heart: Stem cells keep cardiac beat in synchrony (Science World Report)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


Fitbit can track recovery from heart surgery
TIME
Wireless activity trackers may do more than log how many steps you take. Doctors are turning to them to understand which factors help patients recover faster from surgery. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota equipped nearly 150 heart-surgery patients over age 50 with Fitbit activity trackers on their ankles on the first day of their recovery.
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The healthcare overhaul: What you need to know
The Wall Street Journal
Whatever its larger merits or shortcomings, the federal healthcare overhaul seems likely to benefit one demographic group in particular: The 50-plus crowd. Starting Oct. 1, state-based health insurance exchanges created by the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will open for business. For those without access to insurance through work — or for the self-employed who have been buying coverage as sole proprietors — the exchanges will serve as clearinghouses for evaluating and buying health plans.
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Electronic records tied to fewer hospitalizations
Reuters
Switching from paper to electronic medical records at health clinics led to "modest reductions" in the number of people with diabetes that went to the emergency room or were hospitalized, in a new study. Researchers looking at before-and-after rates found both ER visits and hospital admissions dropped by between 5 and 6 percent once the computerized records were put in place, but that there was no change in the frequency of office visits.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Male sensitivity written in the genes
The New York Times
In human development, certain genes act as master switches, ensuring that we are born with similar attributes (one head, two lungs, 10 fingers) in nearly all circumstances.

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read more
Key 'personalized medicine' review published
ScienceDaily
Research into 'personalized' medicine is being led by a University of Greenwich team. Currently, many medicines which are prescribed to patients either do not work properly or have some significant side effects.

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Should you get sequenced? Not all bad genes predict disease
NBC News
For NBC News chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman, having a "boring genome," is a good problem to have. Snyderman revealed a snapshot of her genetic code on TODAY Wednesday, after having two types of genetic testing.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Is the healthcare market competitive?
By Mike Wokasch
Consumers benefit from competition that provides incentives for continuous product improvements and encourages a higher level of service performance. More importantly, competition can help keep prices in check. Competitive markets exist when consumers have multiple purchasing options and choices with transparent pricing. The healthcare market has constrained competition, providing a platform for mediocre quality of care and unsustainable, rising healthcare costs.
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The costly paradox of healthcare technology
MIT Technology Review
Jonathan S. Skinner writes: As an economist who studies healthcare, I find it hard to know whether to welcome or fear new technology. Surgeons can replace a heart valve with a plastic and metal one that unfolds once threaded through arteries — repairs that used to be made by cracking open the chest. Customized cancer drugs hold the promise of making fatal diseases treatable.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Nexavar gets FDA nod for thyroid cancer
dailyRx News
Most thyroid cancers are treatable, even curable. As with most cancers, however, tumors are more difficult to treat once spreading begins. A medication is being evaluated to strengthen the arsenal against advanced thyroid cancer. Nexavar is being fast-tracked for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic thyroid cancer that does not respond to radioactive iodine.
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FDA approves a drug for late-stage pancreatic cancer
The New York Times
The Food and Drug Administration approved Celgene's drug Abraxane for use in treating advanced pancreatic cancer, supplementing the thin arsenal available to fight the disease. In a clinical trial, Abraxane prolonged the lives of patients by a little less than two months on average. Pancreatic specialists have said the drug was a welcome, if modest, advance against a disease that is extremely tough to treat.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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