This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 25, 2014
Advertisement
   NAMCP   AAMCN    AAIHDS    Conferences    JMCM    Contact Us  

Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


Click here to visit the conference website.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts

 



Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

If you are interested in advertising on the website or in JMCM, please click here.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Fall Managed Care Forum 2014

The Fall Forum will feature the first Annual Innovation Awards for the NAMCP Medical Directors Institute, AAMCN and AAIHDS. If you are interested in applying for this award, please contact Katie Eads at keads@namcp.org or 804-527-1905 and we will send you an application.

The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


GENOMICS


Mutations in gene linked to brain development 'may be a cause of autism'
Medical News Today
Rates of autism have increased significantly in recent years, with 1 in 68 children in the U.S. diagnosed with the disorder, compared with 1 in 150 back in 2000. Increasingly, research suggests severe cases of autism may stem from gene mutations that develop in the egg or sperm, rather than mutations that are inherited from parents. These are known as de novo mutations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Looking to share your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of GBEMTI eNews , we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Battling superbugs with gene-editing system
Phys.org
In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Modifying your genes could modify your future fitness
The Globe and Mail
Skipped the gym yesterday? Oops — now your unborn kids, and their kids, are going to struggle with weight and cholesterol for their entire lives. If only you’d spent more time practicing tennis, they’d inherit your devastating passing shot. Or maybe not.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
What is Solesta?

What does a good day mean for your patients?

LEARN MORE
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the GBEMTI eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
MORE


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


US in danger of losing biotechnology edge, experts warn
Bioscience Technology
The United States is in danger of losing its biomedical edge to countries that are aggressively funding research into personalized medicine. That was a key message from the 21st Century Cures Roundtable at National Jewish Health on Wednesday. The discussion, hosted by U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Denver, featured a panel of experts from academia, government and industry.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Stem cells have potential to repair diseased corneas
Health Canal
Corneal transplant is a known means of successfully treating corneal disease. However, without unlimited donor corneas, researchers say there is a need to study alternate methods of treatment for eye disease and eye trauma. One method being studied at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is the transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into the cornea stroma.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stem cell research breaks ground with nearly 100 percent boost in production, thanks to vitamin C
Medical Daily
Stem cells use in the medical field is a promising and quickly growing field. Two exciting announcements have rocked the field of stem cells and suggest that soon this fascinating and potentially history-making therapy will finally be available as a treatment option.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


How technology is going to disrupt healthcare
Forbes
In 1000 B.C., the only early test for diabetes was whether your urine attracted ants. In 2012, 25.8 million United States residents with diabetes spent $245 billion on diabetes, a figure presently rising by 7 percent per annum. But the cost of testing blood-sugar levels is rapidly falling as a handheld device in the home takes over from a laboratory visit and analysis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why our technology risks patients' lives, rather than save them
The Wall Street Journal
The idea that saving patients’ lives demands heroism is a harmful misconception about health and medicine seen in popular culture. It’s fun to watch “House” on TV and marvel at his quirky genius at diagnosing patients’ diseases. Or to watch “ER” reruns as a team of physicians and nurses bring patients back from the brink of death.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


3 reasons why healthcare will favor Google over Apple
Forbes
This is not a typical comparison of Apple's products or features compared to Google, but it is a comparison of the underlying operating systems — and even more specifically how these relate to enterprise healthcare. Unlike consumer health and fitness, enterprise healthcare applications are typically ones that are licensed or owned by the healthcare facility, provider or institution for managing healthcare data on behalf of patient populations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Mutations in gene linked to brain development 'may be a cause of autism'
Medical News Today
Rates of autism have increased significantly in recent years, with 1 in 68 children in the U.S. diagnosed with the disorder, compared with 1 in 150 back in 2000.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
When cancer is in your genes
U.S. News & World Report
In many families, cancer genes are passed down through generations like an unwanted heirloom. But thanks to ever-improving genetic testing, doctors are able to identify these genes better than ever before — and offer patients treatment options to not only stop cancer from setting in, but to stop the gene from being passed on as well.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Schizophrenia 'made up of 8 specific genetic disorders'
Medical News Today
Past studies have indicated that rather than being a single disease, schizophrenia is a collection of different disorders.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


The FDA wants to talk about medical device cybersecurity
The Washington Post
The Food and Drug Administration is asking the public to weigh in on the cybersecurity of medical devices and holding a conference on the subject, organized in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security. The conference — technically a workshop — will be open to the public and take place on Oct. 21-22, during National Cybersecurity Awareness month, in Arlington, the agency said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Testosterone replacement therapy comes under scrutiny; FDA advisory panel rejects new drug
The Plain Dealer
Concerned about the increased risk of heart attack or stroke, an advisory committee for the Food and Drug Administration recommended that drugs designed to boost levels of testosterone in the body should be used only by men with specific medical conditions affecting the testicles, and not for those who are simply being treated for the "Low T" condition.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Treating migraines: More ways to fight the pain
FDA.gov
Thought there was no hope for treating your migraine headaches? Don’t give up. In the past year, the Food and Drug Administration has given adults new options for treating migraines by allowing the marketing of two prescription devices for such headaches.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FDA panel backs limits on testosterone drugs
The New York Times
An expert panel voted overwhelmingly for the Food and Drug Administration to impose strict new limitations on the multibillion-dollar testosterone drug industry, recommending that the agency tighten labels for the medicines so they are not prescribed to men who only have problems related to aging, such as low energy and libido. The F.D.A. often takes the advice of such panels.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS


CMS: ACOs improve quality, save money
Bloomberg BNA
Accountable care organizations created under the Affordable Care Act are meeting their goals of improving patient care while saving Medicare money, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said Sept. 16. ACOs in the Pioneer ACO Model and Medicare Shared Savings Program generated more than $372 million in total program savings for Medicare ACOs, the agency said in a fact sheet.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


ACO programs save Medicare more than $800M, data show
California Healthline
Sixty-four of the 243 Medicare accountable care organizations that launched in 2012 have saved enough to earn bonuses, according to financial performance results released by CMS. The results are from two ACO programs that began in 2012: the Medicare Shared Savings Program and the CMS Innovation Center's Pioneer ACO program.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


West Africa's future darkening as Ebola cases skyrocket
By Lauren Swan
The WHO and CDC are estimating the total death toll of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to end somewhere around 20,000, but others have predicted over 4 million. Food prices are rising quickly, and quarantines are being imposed for entire counties in an effort to gain some kind of control over the disease. The truth of it is that the situation in West Africa is worse than ever, and the window to stop Ebola has likely closed. Some speculate that the latest death toll, 2,630 dead and 5,357 infected, is actually a sign that we are gaining some kind of footing in fighting the viral outbreak. However, the numbers are misleading.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US: We'll pay for health insurance
World: Not us

CNBC
There's a world of difference between Americans and the rest of the planet on the question of the government paying for health insurance — but the gap is even bigger within the U.S. between Democrats and Republicans. Americans, to a striking degree, are less inclined than citizens of other countries to say that the "government" should be responsible for providing healthcare coverage, according to data compiled for CNBC and Burson-Marsteller by market research firm Penn Schoen Berland.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Children's health insurance at a crossroads
The New York Times
Federal financing for a beneficial health insurance program for low-income children, known as the Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP, will run out next year unless Congress agrees to extend it. Bills are pending in both the House and the Senate to extend financing for four years, to 2019. Congress should approve the extension in the lame-duck session after the midterm elections so that families and state officials will know what the future holds.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FAST FACTS
"A large percentage of foodborne disease outbreaks are spread by contaminated hands. Appropriate hand washing practices can reduce the risk of foodborne illness and other infections."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Schizophrenia 'made up of 8 specific genetic disorders' (Medical News Today)
Study identifies genes tied to colon cancer (Health Canal)
Blood test for depression is 1st of its kind (HNGN)
Researchers develop new type of genetic test for identifying developmental disorders (Medical Xpress)
Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight (NewScientist)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Sept 18, 2014
Sept. 11, 2014
Sept. 4, 2014
August 28, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063