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Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Join the nation's top consulting experts on Oct. 3rd, 12-1 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar exploring the impact of the ACA on U.S. Hospitals and what organizations can do to prepare for the changes.
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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 




GENOMICS

Genes associated with autism are surprisingly large
Scientific American
Enzymes called topoisomerases are crucial for the expression of extremely long genes in neurons, according to a study published in Nature. More than one-quarter of these genes are known autism candidates, the study found. In the process of doing these analyses, the researchers stumbled on something surprising about autism genes in general: They're three to four times longer than the average gene expressed in neurons.
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Gene that triggers 'memory extinction' discovered
Medical News Today
Many of us are the bearers of "bad" memories that, to this day, continue to affect our lives. Now, scientists say they have discovered a gene essential for "memory extinction," the process by which our brain replaces older memories with new experiences. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say the discovery could help people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder by replacing "fearful" memories with more positive associations.
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Poverty can trump a winning hand of genes
The Wall Street Journal
We all notice that some people are smarter than others. You might naturally wonder how much these differences in intelligence depend on genes or upbringing. But that question, it turns out, is impossible to answer. That's because changes in our environment can actually transform the relationship among our traits, our upbringing and our genes.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Healthcare Professionals Save with Sprint

Switch to Sprint and save. Healthcare professionals can save at least 15% monthly with Sprint. Sprint offers special promotions for healthcare employees. With Sprint, you save more and get Truly UnlimitedSM data. Visit www.sprint.com/daretocompare for more details and to start saving today.
 


BIOTECH/DIAGNOSTICS/PERSONALIZED MEDICINE


Personalized medicine may be good for patients but bad for drug companies' bottom line
Forbes
Medicine's new mantra is "the right drug for the right patient at the right time." In other words, medical treatments are gradually shifting from a "one size fits all" approach to a more personalized one, so that patients can be matched to the best therapy based on their genetic makeup and other predictive factors.
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Big Pharma replaces innovation with acquisition
By Mike Wokasch
Big Pharma, including Big Biotech, has executed about 130 mergers or acquisitions in each of the past couple of years. The overwhelming majority of deals designed to fill depleted Big Pharma pipelines with more novel and innovative technologies in later stages than their own R&D had been able to produce. If Big Pharma is relying on others to do drug discovery, how deep does the discovery pipeline have to go to be indefinitely sustainable?
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REGENERATIVE MEDICINE


Advance seen in turning adult cells into stem cells
HealthDay News via WebMD
Scientists have figured out a way to more readily turn adult skin cells into primitive stem cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of chronic diseases. In a study published Sept. 18 in Nature, Israeli researchers reported that they identified the key molecule that stops adult cells from transforming into so-called induced pluripotent stem cells. Those stem cells are similar to the primitive cells found in embryos, and have the potential to generate any type of body tissue, scientists believe.
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New approach to treating human brain cancer could lead to improved outcomes
Medical Xpress
A new experimental approach to treating a type of brain cancer called medulloblastoma has been developed by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. The method targets cancer stem cells — the cells that are critical for maintaining tumor growth — and halts their ability to proliferate by inhibiting enzymes that are essential for tumor progression.
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Disease-specific human embryonic stem cell lines placed on NIH registry
ScienceDaily
Scientists from King's College London have announced that 16 human embryonic stem cell lines have been approved by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and placed on their stem cell registry, making them freely available for federally-funded research in the U.S. The stem cell lines, which carry genes for a variety of hereditary disorders such as Huntington's disease, spinal muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, are considered to be ideal research tools for designing models to understand disease progression, and ultimately in helping scientists develop new treatments for patients.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "STEM CELL."


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Are you right- or left-handed? It could be genetic (The Huffington Post)
Personalized medicine and patent eligibility (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News)
FDA panel backs drug for early-stage breast cancer (The Associated Press via NBC News)
Self-care for the caregiver (By Karen Childress)
FDA announces new labeling guidelines for longer acting painkillers (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


EMERGING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES


New prosthetic: Man controls bionic leg with thoughts
Live Science
A 32-year-old man who lost his leg below the knee after a motorcycle accident four years ago now has a robotic prosthesis he can control with his mind, according to a new report of his case. While similar technology has allowed amputees to control bionic arms with their thoughts, Zac Vawter is the first amputee with a thought-controlled bionic leg, the researchers say.
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Why medicine will be more like Wal-Mart
MIT Technology Review
The idea that technology will change medicine is as old as the electronic computer itself. Actually, even older. In 1945, Vannevar Bush, the man with the vision for the National Institutes of Health, foresaw a Memex computer program that would allow access to past books and records. A lone physician searching for a diagnosis in far-flung case histories was one of the applications Bush imagined.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Genes associated with autism are surprisingly large
Scientific American
Enzymes called topoisomerases are crucial for the expression of extremely long genes in neurons, according to a study published in Nature. More than one-quarter of these genes are known autism candidates, the study found.

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How personalized will medicine get?
NPR
Call it extremely personalized medicine. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon explains how in the future, we'll be able to grow replacement organs from our very own cells.

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Researchers pin down the genetics of going under
Medical Xpress
Falling asleep in your bed at night and being "put to sleep" under general anesthesia — as well as waking up in the morning or coming out of anesthesia — aren't quite the same thing, yet they share some important similarities.

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MANAGED HEALTHCARE NEWS


Understanding the healthcare exchanges
Forbes
The healthcare exchanges are being rolled out on Oct. 1 and 50 million people will be encouraged to go to the exchanges to obtain coverage. Upon the roll out of the exchanges there are five developments that you need to consider.
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Lower health insurance premiums to come at cost of fewer choices
The New York Times
Federal officials often say that health insurance will cost consumers less than expected under President Barack Obama's healthcare law. But they rarely mention one big reason: Many insurers are significantly limiting the choices of doctors and hospitals available to consumers. From California to Illinois to New Hampshire, and in many states in between, insurers are driving down premiums by restricting the number of providers who will treat patients in their new health plans.
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FDA: NEW TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY


Workgroup recommends limited health IT regulation by FDA
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
As a general rule, health information technology should not be subject to premarket regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. But there should be exceptions for high-risk products and situations. This is according to the final recommendations for a risk-based regulatory framework for health IT adopted by the Health IT Policy Committee, a group of industry stakeholders convened to advise federal officials on a nationwide health IT infrastructure.
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FDA to focus on regulation of smartphones, wireless devices
ModernHealthcare
As the number and array of health apps for mobile devices continue to explode, the federal government will keep its regulatory focus on a narrow band of products that pose the most potential risk to patients and consumers. On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration issued a final draft of guidance on its regulatory strategy for health and wellness apps on smartphones and other wireless devices.
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FDA issues final rules governing mobile medical apps
Reuters via Fox News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued final rules covering the development of mobile medical apps, saying it will focus it oversight on those apps that have the potential to harm consumers if they do not function properly. The FDA has cleared about 100 mobile medical apps over the past decade, including products that can diagnose abnormal heart rhythms or help patients monitor their blood sugar. About 40 apps were cleared within the past two years.
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FAST FACTS
"Seizures can be caused by a number of factors, including epilepsy or fever, and most seizures stop themselves, according to the National Institutes of Health."


 

Genomics Biotech and Emerging Medical Technologies Institute eBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2635
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Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
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